Verbal, Written warnings and Termination - page 16

by madwife2002 Asst. Admin

71,344 Views | 162 Comments

i know a lot of health care employees are worried or concerned they may be on the ladder from verbal warning to written warnings and then fired. for many this is not an unrealistic fear it is something which is affecting their... Read More


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    Congratulations on your new job! I'm glad the previous employer didn't destroy you! I also got a new job and am really happy. However, ........let's not forget what we have learned - being graduates from the school of hard knocks. Trust is gone, and it's wise not to forget it. Enjoy your job and stay under the radar.
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    No stars - how did your situation work out? It sounds like the missing topical med was found in the sharps as co-signed as a waste by your coworker. The CNA's account of your touching a patient with a glove on that you also used to touch another patient sounds really arguable. Her word against yours.

    Did you file an EEOC complaint. You can do that without a lawyer. (Contact the EEOC and they will tell you exactly what you need to do.) All of the documents that need to be filed and legal ease can be done by yourself or with help from a legal assistance firm (paralegals or such). WAY Cheaper! You don't really need a lawyer unless you go to court. Believe me, I've learned the Hard way $$$$, and did most of the work myself anyhow! I actually could have done better without the lawyer. Not kidding.

    Let me know what happened. It's not to late to file.
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    Quote from cosmicsun
    No stars - how did your situation work out? It sounds like the missing topical med was found in the sharps as co-signed as a waste by your coworker. The CNA's account of your touching a patient with a glove on that you also used to touch another patient sounds really arguable. Her word against yours.

    Did you file an EEOC complaint. You can do that without a lawyer. (Contact the EEOC and they will tell you exactly what you need to do.) All of the documents that need to be filed and legal ease can be done by yourself or with help from a legal assistance firm (paralegals or such). WAY Cheaper! You don't really need a lawyer unless you go to court. Believe me, I've learned the Hard way $$$$, and did most of the work myself anyhow! I actually could have done better without the lawyer. Not kidding.

    Let me know what happened. It's not to late to file.
    To tell you the truth I am just now coming through a honking deep depression , with the help of my primary doc and psychologist, and some meds. So I havent done anything...YET. I appreciate the info. Thanks.
    No, the med wasn't found in the sharps box, and I should've thought to look through the trash , but didn't. And of course, the LTC wasn't about to go through trash looking for a syringe folded into a glove. But that's the only other place it could have been.
    I've been working as a CNA doing private duty through an agency
    Can't post anymore right now, my crazy grandchildren are bouncing all over me on the sofa........
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    Today I was discharged from employment due to multiple med errors including transcription errors, failing to remove old patches...no harm was brought to any resident. Makes me feel like a bad nurse, but I know this isn't true; my heart and mind are in the right place, however the environment and circumstances of this last employer were not. Just like all the other threads, either you're in, or you're not.
    So I've already gathered a couple job applications (both from previous employers, I left both jobs in good standing and was offered a job OUT OF THE BLUE from one of those employers late last year.) Now, I must fill in my last place of employment.
    I know not to lie about my "reason for leaving" this employer; I have read and read and now my eyes hurt so I decided to just ask straight up:

    What reason do you give for leaving a place of employment in which you were discharged?



    Please, please, please answer this question. I'm in need of employment or risk losing my house and my vehicles.
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    [QUOTE=lkadams2;6637255]Today I was discharged from employment due to multiple med errors including transcription errors, failing to remove old patches...no harm was brought to any resident. Makes me feel like a bad nurse, but I know this isn't true; my heart and mind are in the right place, however the environment and circumstances of this last employer were not. Just like all the other threads, either you're in, or you're not.
    So I've already gathered a couple job applications (both from previous employers, I left both jobs in good standing and was offered a job OUT OF THE BLUE from one of those employers late last year.) Now, I must fill in my last place of employment.
    I know not to lie about my "reason for leaving" this employer; I have read and read and now my eyes hurt so I decided to just ask straight up:

    What reason do you give for leaving a place of employment in which you were discharged?

    I was recently advised to write on the application that "it was a poor skills fit" and then when asked at the interview, explain the circumstances.
    adventure780 likes this.
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    I would put "terminated" or something to that effect, then explain during the interview. It is very stressful and difficult to have to explain firing but reality is that most people today have been fired from a job at least once. Employers simply do not hesitate to fire anymore for any reason. You can have your say at an interview. I like the poor skills fit verbage, it says volumes without sounding ominous.
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    Is New Jersey an at will state? I was let go from my first nursing job. i was told then I could reapply if I wished after a year. Nearly a year later and I am on the don't rehire list. It doesn't make sense to me.
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    Quote from wondern
    Just remember you are not !

    '"I feel chewed up and spit out" sounds like a song, poweroflove. Great description. We nurses need more protection of our jobs from unethical managers and 'mob mentalities' as well. Hang in there, friend. hug:
    I totally agree with you. I was told recently if we didn't write zeros under adding or substracting on the narc page we could get fired for not writing anything there. A nurse newer than me to the faclity told me this as a message from the DON that was sitting nearby. I was like why is she being so picky? I think what matters is to limit med errors, patient safety and make sure your count is accurate. Do your best work when you are at work. Do not consider yourself a failure. I did consider myself a failure when I first got terminated from a previous job. However that past experience has made me stronger. Small stupid things higher ups pick at don't bother me as much. I am more comfortable in my own skin.
    martinalpn likes this.
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    I completely hear what you're saying! This scrutiny on small details by higher ups is just pushing me farther and farther away from nursing. All of my patient care has been fine-it is just all this documentation that has scalded me like a lobster in hot water. "if it wasn't documented, it wasn't done" is true, but when you're trying to finish and have people breathing down your neck to "chart faster, finish faster, hurry the hell up, you're costing the business OT money"-so what do you do?! My belief is always patient care first, paperwork second as I always thought that was the priority??? Guess not, for it is the insurance companies that dictate how care is given, things charted 5 times in different places and "document, document, document"!
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    Quote from adventure780
    Is New Jersey an at will state? I was let go from my first nursing job. i was told then I could reapply if I wished after a year. Nearly a year later and I am on the don't rehire list. It doesn't make sense to me.
    Yes, like most states NJ is an at will state. The only exceptions are union shop employers where some of the rehire policies are determined by the union contact. I've heard some employers keep the "do not rehire" list active for decades, even for unrelated positions (i.e. terminated as a CNA still ineligible for rehire as an RN 10 years later).


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