Trouble c accents at work? - page 3

I have a really hard time with language accents be it either foreign or regional dialects. I had an altercation with a house supervisor the other day who accused me of not listening when I did not... Read More

  1. by   Roy Fokker
    I speak English - not American Plus, I can imitate Fez or Apu easy as pie - always breaks tension

    But I have to be careful about what words I use. Example - I have to remember to ask for an "eraser", not a "rubber" :imbar


    cheers,
  2. by   anne74
    I think different accents are kind of cool. I think if someone gets upset when told they have an accent, they're being a bit oversensitive. But, I guess to them it sounds like they don't have the one "acceptable" way of speaking. Accents are relative. To them, you have an accent.

    I usually just say, "I'm sorry - I didn't understand what you said," or ask them to repeat what they said. In our business, proper communication is imperative, so ask them to repeat themselves until you understand. If they get mad about that, then it's their problem. All in all, people just need to chill and help each other out.
  3. by   scribblerpnp
    I moved three hours (by a car drive) north of where I grew up. People there would say, "Wow, you really have a southern accent. You talk so slow!" then would go home every other weekend or so (I was in grad school) and at home people would say, "You are talking so fast!" My accent would change! Once I got back to work from being at home, the people at work would tease me saying they knew I had gone home to get "charged up!"

    I worked in a big children's hospital and often we would get people from my home area since we were the closest big children's hospital. I would always get assigned to theme because, "You can understand those people better than we can!"

    I've lost a lot of my origional accent and it is more neutral now, but when I get tired, excited, or angry, watch out!

    Anyway, EVERY person has an accent, so I don't see the big deal about stating as such. Where I live (tri-state area) you can almost guess the COUNTY and state of where someone is from by how they talk. Big deal.
  4. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Great topic to discuss...I think anyone who has struggled with a foreign language can attest to difficulties expressing oneself in foreign tongue...However, those professionals who can't speak clear English should not get so angry when we ask for clarification or could you express that thought another way...I don't know how many times I get a look of "your stupid" when all I did is not get a clear understanding of what the nurse was talking about.
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    I learned some Spanish but have a heavy American accent.
    The sound when a 'g' sounds like an 'h' is impossible for me.
    I actually write the words "oxgeno" and "alergia".

    Patients are so appreciative they than me when I apologise for my "acento".
  6. by   eandgsma
    I am originally from NJ, born and raised. I moved to So CA when I got married at 19. This was at the time of Mike Myers skit "coffee talk" on SNL. I had SO many people here asking me to say "coffee talk" or other sayings from the show. I was so sick of people asking me to say things because of my accent that I purposefully (sp?) started speaking the way they do here in CA. I have lost my accent now after almost 13 years in CA. But, if I get angry or nervous...watch out! The Jerseygirl comes out in full force. I actually found myself correcting my words when on the phone with HR the other day because I was nervous and the NJ was coming through. LOL! When I speak with my friends back home on the phone, my DH always can tell because certain words start sounding like I used to speak.

    Back to when I first came out here...it wasn't that I was offended, I was just tired of people asking me to say certain words because they thought it was funny. It was funny but it got old. Although, there was one man who said my accent sounded "uneducated". BAH on him!

    - N
  7. by   CHATSDALE
    i find that the longer you are around a certain accent the easier it is to understand, even if it is a different person talking...we had an indian md and he was SO hard to understand..after while we could understand everything and tell the patients what is was that he said

    if they don't understand me the first time i try and enunciate as clearly as i can...some yankees think that they are SO FUNNY when they mock a southern accent,,
    previous post was right when mentioning that a lot of people from other parts of the country think that they are deemed to be the superior when they hear a southern drawl...they also make a deduction for being short
    they can't understand why nobody agrees with them
  8. by   shoegalRN
    I am so glad I've worked in the telecommunications field for over 13 years and I've heard just about every accent there is. I think this will help me alot once I become a nurse in how to communicate with foreign patients/co-workers as well as understanding them.
  9. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    I speak English - not American Plus, I can imitate Fez or Apu easy as pie - always breaks tension

    But I have to be careful about what words I use. Example - I have to remember to ask for an "eraser", not a "rubber" :imbar


    cheers,
    I swear Roy,

    You must be my long lost cousin!

    I'll fake a good Jamaican accent or a Bristish Indian even though I'm Bahamian. Most folks don't know Bahamian from Jamaican from West Indian and if I hear "Hey Mon" one more time I'll will scream!!!!

    Don't get me started on my use of "The Queen's English"... And I'll ask for a rubber or some biscuits or Weetabix quick and in a hurry

    What's even funnier is that I lived in Texas so imagine an island sounding British/Bahamian/ Texas/ Indian twang when I'm trying to be a smarty-arty!!!

    Buwhaaaa!!!

    I worked as a phone customer service agent so I got calls from all over. I can understand just about everybody as long as they talk loud enough. (The mumblers get me more than accents...grrr)
    Last edit by sunnyjohn on Jan 3, '07
  10. by   pickledpepperRN
    I bet you "cousins" push a trolley down the hallway too.

    One of the most charming accents I've heard is an Irish priest at a hospital where I work registry sometimes speaking fluent Spanish with his Irish brogue.
  11. by   P_RN
    Quote from rngreenhorn
    Do y'all know what the plural form of y'all is?




    Answer: all y'all

    F'shah tis.

    But y'all is always plural so all y'all would be inclusive of several y'all groups. Say there were the Baptists over yonder and the pentacostals over that away, then to call 'em to dinner would be ALL Y'ALL come wash your hands and let'e eat.
  12. by   rngreenhorn
    Quote from P_RN
    F'shah tis.

    But y'all is always plural so all y'all would be inclusive of several y'all groups. Say there were the Baptists over yonder and the pentacostals over that away, then to call 'em to dinner would be ALL Y'ALL come wash your hands and let'e eat.
    Well awe'll bee... awe do b'leave yaw right.... hee hee
  13. by   Jamesdotter
    I've worked with several people from Russia (and the Ukraine) and have had no particular trouble understanding them--except on the phone! The clerk in PT called the other day to remind me of an appointment. The only reason I knew what she was talking about was because I knew I had an appointment!

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