A time to reform nursing education? - page 8

After reading some very interesting posts around here lately in regards to "fluff" being taught in nursing school, I wonder if it is time to reform nursing education. I feel we could do without the nursing diagnosis. I... Read More

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    I think the word "fluff" in relation to actual nursing coursework means all the time spent on "therapeutic communication" and "anything NANDA". Huge focus loss.

    Too much time is spent dancing around the elephant in the room. Sure it's important to know how to communicate, but the main focus in nursing edu should be on pathophysiology/A&P/Pharmacology and your skillset of assessment/intervention as part of a team: you and physician, you and ancillary staff. Simply, "what do I have here, what am I going to do about it".
    DogWmn, SummitRN, Not_A_Hat_Person, and 5 others like this.

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  2. 1
    Quote from LiveToLearn
    This is an incredibly rude and broad generalization. I work 40 hours a week as an educator, 12 hours weekly in the ICU, full time ICU in summers, and am a full time doctoral student. I have no free time. I do this to ensure that what I teach is clinically relevant and current. My students deserve the best. Nursing education is one of the most thankless jobs, and I am as tired of that worn out phrase "those who can, do..." as I am of "all nurses eat their young."

    Trite sayings and insults improve nothing. Honest dialogue and inquiry can change things. It's too bad you prefer the former.

    It makes me sad, honestly. I thought this would be a great thread to read; I have really enjoyed all the constructive comments others have made. I simply do not understand why it is acceptable to insult an entire group of nursing colleagues. It would be met with outrage if I said "Specialty 'x' is for those who can't handle real nursing," but it is acceptable to say all nurse educators "can't do?"
    Thank you for being an nursing educator! I have had wonderful nursing instructors that I will never forget, and I strive to be like them in my own practice. I agree that nursing as a whole needs to let go of tired sayings, and beliefs.
    AOx1 likes this.
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    Initially when I started this thread, I was referring to the actual nursing classes. Updating perhaps? I think our prereqs are ok, they just aren't streamlined like pre-professional programs.
  4. 0
    Ok, quick question...

    If everyone is saying that nursing should be based on the "sciencey" courses... then what would make you different from a doctor other than the amount of said education?
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    Nurse = mini-doctor + nursing diagnoses + therapeutic communication?

    But it is the crux of the matter. What IS nursing? I think it's too broad to try to lump all kinds of nurses together. Maybe it just doesn't make sense to have one standard RN license. Is it realistic to have one standard teaching license for all manner of teachers?College physics instructors, master piano coaches, pre-school teachers and suburban ballet instructors?

    Some kinds of nursing only require a fairly minimal science/medical foundation. Other kinds require a very strong science/medical foundation. Some kinds of nursing can be entered into with fairly quick training. Other kinds demand years of training and experience.

    In order to continue building on the "professionalization" of nursing, perhaps nurses would need to loose some their flexibility. If it's not the case that "a nurse is a nurse is a nurse" then we may need to accept some increased obstacles for nurses in switching between specialties.
    Not_A_Hat_Person, Jarnaes, and 14togo like this.
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    Quote from 2ndwind
    I think the word "fluff" in relation to actual nursing coursework means all the time spent on "therapeutic communication" and "anything NANDA". Huge focus loss.

    Too much time is spent dancing around the elephant in the room. Sure it's important to know how to communicate, but the main focus in nursing edu should be on pathophysiology/A&P/Pharmacology and your skillset of assessment/intervention as part of a team: you and physician, you and ancillary staff. Simply, "what do I have here, what am I going to do about it".
    Yeah...my original degrees were from a liberal arts college and I sure as heck never considered ANY of those courses as 'fluff'. I did think, however, that a nursing program specifically intended for people who have degrees in one or more fields would take into account that they already have demonstrated reading, writing, presentation, and communications skills and place greater emphasis on the SKILLSETS particular to nursing.

    You are dead on about today's educational emphasis in nursing being "the elephant in the room". We part ways from our educators at graduation with assurances that we "know more than we think we know". Yet there seems to be an awful lot of terror and tears for a lot of folks during that first year coupled with feelings of self doubt and lack of confidence in what they're doing. There simply has GOT to be a better way of preparing people to enter the field.
    flyingchange, SummitRN, netglow, and 1 other like this.
  7. 0
    Another student frustrated with nursing school

    Why is Nursing School So Flawed? - Nursing for Nurses
  8. 2
    I was fortunate enough to have had a university education before I learned the nursing trade. It has served me well, and I credit my critical thinking skills to my previous education.

    I only wish others were so lucky. You learn a trade in nursing school; you definitely don't get an education.
    netglow and GreyGull like this.
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    Quote from Fribblet
    I was fortunate enough to have had a university education before I learned the nursing trade. It has served me well, and I credit my critical thinking skills to my previous education.

    I only wish others were so lucky. You learn a trade in nursing school; you definitely don't get an education.
    From reading these posts, whether a student gains an education in nursing school seems to depend on the program they attend.
    netglow likes this.
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    I felt (as did more than a few of my clinical instructors) that the educational assignments required by the faculty from our school that comprised the bulk of our clinical grades actually DETRACTED from the learning experiences we were supposed to be having during our limited clinical time.

    For example, take the almighty concept crap...er...map. That...to ME...is an exercise in how to condense a large quantity of information into a pictorial representation that fits on a poster. I shudder to think how many times people had to stay up the ENTIRE night to get those things done when they should have instead been getting a good night's sleep so they could focus on actually learning something USEFUL while at their clinical that day.


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