The Today Show - page 8

Anyone watch this morning? Their medical expert was on giving tips to patients on how to prevent errors while they are in the hospital. One thing she mentioned was that hospitals (nurses especially)... Read More

  1. by   ArmyMSN
    Quote from RNin'08
    This is actually the policy for the facility where I work. All nurses wear purple scrubs, CNAs/techs all wear yellow, unit assitants wear pale green, etc. It is helpful for staff but doesn't seem to help patients, except that we can ask "do you recall what color the person was wearing?" and then explain the color system to the patient (not that they ever remember it). I don't have anything against the policy, makes shopping for work clothes easier

    RNin'08
    ~my reality check bounced~
    I'm embarassed by what some of our colleagues wear. I ran into an LPN from another unit - he was dressed in blue camaflaouge (sp) scubs. He might be the best nurse ever, but the scrubs don't give him or the hospital much credibility. I prefer that nurses represent their profession by dressing more professional -
  2. by   LeahJet
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    hey-look-it's-my-underwear problem

    ~snicker~
  3. by   parrotmom
    Did everyone miss the post a page or so back that said she worked a shift with poop on her uniform???? If this happened regardless of your clothing color can I say hazardous? I keep a spare set of work clothes in my car as I work far from home or in my locker. It is the fact that someone would work with stains all over their clothes that lends the criticas to say we do't dress professionally. With white you are right there is no hiding a stain so no choice but tochange. I am not a white fan wore them for clinicals and just in case kept a TIDE pen in my pocket. I didn't get bllod poop or pee or any food products on them and yes I had to kneel down on the floor a few times as well. This is an issue like many othrs never to be resolved until AMerica as a whole takes prie in itself and stops wearing yard work clothes to go shopping and clubbing cllothes to church and work. It's not about what others think but how you respect yourself and I for one am old fasioned and believe you dress nicely when you go out in public to eat or shop or work. I believe I am treated better by the places I go as well. Have tried the dress two different ways and see how I am treated experiment. Dress for success!
  4. by   shodobe
    Quote from MLOS
    I respect your opinion. However, frankly, yes I do think my professionalism "oozes from my pores" when I assess my patient competently, titrate their meds appropriately, educate them, constantly reprioritize the needs of all of my patients, use the sixth sense I'm developing to anticipate when things are going to go badly, and play mediator when docs & patients/families are not communicating adequately.

    Having said that, I do believe there are some firm limits - visible tattoos & piercings, excessive jewelry, or any tummy or cleavage exposure is absolutely unacceptable, in my view. But in my town, on football Sundays, you'll find everyone from docs to dietary in their game shirts.
    You are an exception. Unfortunately it doesn't apply to everyone. Where I work it seems the staff, not all though, are of the opinion they are "over priced babysitters" that don't need to have an air of professiomalism. They just don't look or act the part. We do, however, have quite a number of very good, well qualified, dedicated nurses who have about them the aura of what it takes to be a nurse. The others are from waaaaaaaaay out of town and brought with them many, many bad habits from around the world. They really give their fellow country men and women a bad rep. I blame alot of this on upper management who mostly doesn't give a rat's a*s on what goes on in their departments. You don't have to be hard nose but need to show some discipline in how your staff acts, I know mine does.
  5. by   thumperRN
    how in the heck can staff even remember who's who and who's what when the administration has purposefully created labelling smoke screens. invented, imho, to keep the patient from realizing that the housekeeper from yesterday has now become the phlebologist.

    couldn't have said it better!!! what happened to rn, lpn/lvn, nurse's aide, and unit secretary?? at the job i have been at for the last couple of months they have the most ridiculous terminology for the employees!! give me a break - no wonder know one knows who we are!! :uhoh21:
  6. by   Mommy TeleRN
    Interesting the original topic here is med errors..it's incredulous we are discussing uniforms and not something that I find crazy insane...doctors orders that are illegible. This is a topic I've been meaning to ask here. Does ANYONE work at a facility that requires computerized orders? I am in awe all the time that doctors can get away with this handwriting in this day and age of errors and lawsuits...
    Of course the staffing issues too. Nurses need to have time to spend with the patient and not be trying to juggle 8,9 etc patients ... no wonder errors are made
  7. by   mercyteapot
    Personally, I consider scrubs God's gift to nurses... I am old enough to have worn white and I hated it. The pants made me look like the Sta-Puf Marshallow Man and it was uncomfortable to work in the dresses. I don't mind the notion of color coding various positions, just so long as nurses don't end up in white again!
  8. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Mommy Nurse2b
    Interesting the original topic here is med errors..it's incredulous we are discussing uniforms
    I have noticed that once you get beyond 10 pages of any thread the topic switches to one of three things: ADN vs. BSN (or RN vs. LPN), the nursing shortage, or uniforms.

    Why is that?
  9. by   weirdRN
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I have noticed that once you get beyond 10 pages of any thread the topic switches to one of three things: ADN vs. BSN (or RN vs. LPN), the nursing shortage, or uniforms.

    Why is that?
    Not True.

    There are some excellent threads that have a lot of discussion in them concerning the OP's content.

    As for the big three, we can discuss those into infinity. Say all the same old tired things and nothing will change because we as nurses do not have the solidarity to form a more perfect union. Consider the AMA as a model for what I am talking about.

    We are too busy tearing each other down to support a national organization.
  10. by   Elisheva
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I have noticed that once you get beyond 10 pages of any thread the topic switches to one of three things: ADN vs. BSN (or RN vs. LPN), the nursing shortage, or uniforms.

    Why is that?
    You forgot a couple: weight/smoking
  11. by   nursejohio
    Quote from mercyteapot
    Wow, and here we've been all along thinking the keys to preventing medical errors were things like safe ratios, adequate training and supervision, staffing levels that ensure no one is forced to come in and work while sick, etc. and it turns out that all along the problem has been our SCRUBS! I don't know about anyone else, but I sure feel silly!!!

    :hatparty: :roll :hatparty:
  12. by   Freedom42
    The issue is not a connection between uniforms and medical mistakes. The issue is that patients and their families say they cannot tell who's who because everyone's wearing scrubs. Yes, nurses have name tags. But not everyone can see them. People interviewed for this study simply said that they'd like to be able to quickly identify who's in charge, and apparently the older-style nurse's uniform and cap enabled them to do that. I don't think Matt Lauer implied anything more.
  13. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from Freedom42
    The issue is not a connection between uniforms and medical mistakes. The issue is that patients and their families say they cannot tell who's who because everyone's wearing scrubs. Yes, nurses have name tags. But not everyone can see them. People interviewed for this study simply said that they'd like to be able to quickly identify who's in charge, and apparently the older-style nurse's uniform and cap enabled them to do that. I don't think Matt Lauer implied anything more.
    Actually both Matt Lauer and Nancy Snyderman made remarks in regards to nurses lack of professional appearance which lead into the white and cap comments. Suggesting patients learn who their nurse would be a better suggestion.

    Where I currently work, patient and their families have no problem identifying who an RN is, but rarely do they understand that A nurse is assigned to a patient and not every nurse on the unit knows every patient. It would have been more prudent a suggestion to inform the public that a particular nurse is assigned to each patient and to make a point of knowing who their nurse is, instead of criticizing our professionalism because we no longer appear in the antiquated, sterotyped, media-hyped homoginized faceless and nameless servant known as "NURSE."

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