The Today Show - page 3

Anyone watch this morning? Their medical expert was on giving tips to patients on how to prevent errors while they are in the hospital. One thing she mentioned was that hospitals (nurses especially)... Read More

  1. by   Maine Critical Care
    Quote from bklynborn
    Anyone watch this morning? Their medical expert was on giving tips to patients on how to prevent errors while they are in the hospital.
    One thing she mentioned was that hospitals (nurses especially) need to go back to being more professional. She mentioned nurses wearing caps or at least going back to wearing white in order to be distinguished from other hospital staff. Matt Laur said he had recently been in the hospital and that nurses are dressing much to casually. Hmmmmmm.......................
    I agree that it is the demeanor and ability to introduce yourself hospital wide that makes an institution a safer place to be. Our hospital is getting better at having everyone introduce themselves EVERY TIME they go in a room, so sick, confused or sensory overloaded patients can know what is going on. We also started a medication reconciliation form from ED to the floor so the MD must address routine meds a person is on at admission. As an aside, yesterday a woman walked into my patient's room, told me she was his cousin, then it turned out my patient wasn't really her cousin, she didn't recognize him in the bed! We as nurses aren't always the ones who aren't recognized. I did manage to get the cousin pointed to the right room after we all had a good laugh.
  2. by   casi
    Why not get the non-healthcare employees out of scrubs and dressed appropriatly. Maybe then make name tags a bit more readable.

    I don't think whites and caps are the solution to ANYTHING.
  3. by   LisaRn21
    Ok... I don't even know where to begin...

    This is making me so mad. First of all I don't even own a cap lol nor am I going to get one or wear one.. I will change careers before I wear all white and look like a giant marshmellow.

    I work in pediatrics and I will admit sometimes the parents confuse me with the aide, however you have to look at the situation. If I am the first person in the room and I happen to do vital signs or change the diaper of the baby (yes even though there are aides I still do VS and clean pts) and then the aide goes in the room after me, and she/he happens to be older than me.. then yes the parents get confused... when I graduated I was 21 there are aides that are 30-40 on the unit I work... its an honest mistake, however I do when I go in rooms make it clear and introduce myself as the Nurse for the day. I can see how different colored uniforms can help, but how would it distinguish between nurses? Patients and Parents don't remember names/facial features...they remember the bears or frogs or whatever is on your shirt. I can't even begin to tell you how many patients I have been able to calm down or even made my assessing them less scary just by talking about the animals/dora/ whoever is on my shirt. I will not work in a pediatric place that does not allow nurses/nursing assistants choose their own clothes. Also I will not wear white... Do you know how many times I am peed on (little boys haha) and puked on by the babies.. Iwill never ever ever wear white again.. ew

    My second pet peeve is also the double marking. Patients should not be marking their body without being told to! It leaves gapping holes for error!!!!!!! Are you kidding me?!?!?!? We mark one side with an Yes and one side with a NO....but god forbid the patient puts a mark themself.. it could definetely screw somethings up... I can see the problem and the huge room for error .

    Ok I am done for now.
  4. by   jb2u
    I have to say that as a PCA, I do not agree with different jobs wearing different color scrubs. I do not agree with wearing white. I mean...they get messed up sooooo easy. How professional is a big tea stain from a drinking mishap? Yes, I have an ID, but the main thing is...whenever I walk into a room, I always say "hello, my name is Jay and I will be your Patient Care Assistant (I do NOT say "PCA"), I will be assiting the nurse with your care and if you need anything just let me know." Of course, if they ask for a med, I let them know that the nurse has to give them that and that I will go let him/her know that you are asking for ____. This is really a non issue. I don't need for every pt and family member on the floor to know that I am a PCA just the ones I am assigned to and the ones that I go into their room to assist another pca or RN.
  5. by   JoeTheNurse
    Pretty much all our student nurses wear whites...so whites would be out for the staff. If solid colors became manditory we would be putting allot of uniform places out of business, at least those selling lots of print tops.

    I'm not wearing the hat!
  6. by   JenNJFLCA
    I didn't even get a cap when I graduated from nursing school! We didn't even wear white for our pinning ceremony. I think we need to bring the American public up to speed about what being a 21st century nurse is all about
  7. by   jahra
    Quote from LisaRn21
    Ok... I don't even know where to begin...

    First of all I don't even own a cap lol nor am I going to get one or wear one.. I will change careers before I wear all white and look like a giant marshmellow.




    Hi Lisa,



    Before the internet and cell phones and all the other
    modern changes....

    When I was a child and young adult nurses were respected
    and the professional uniform was white and a nursing cap.
    Nurses worked very hard in those days.

    Kindly do not degrade the attire of the hard working
    nurses who have worked over the years in a nursing cap
    while caring for their patients.

    Nursing advanced to where it is today because of their
    commitment to patients and their assertiveness to change
    and advance the profession.
  8. by   Elisheva
    I actually like the idea of the white uniform or some kind of identifier. I worked very hard to become a nurse, and I was always proud to wear the uniform.

    Maybe we could all get matching "grillz."
  9. by   eltrip
    Quote from bklynborn
    Anyone watch this morning? Their medical expert was on giving tips to patients on how to prevent errors while they are in the hospital.
    One thing she mentioned was that hospitals (nurses especially) need to go back to being more professional. She mentioned nurses wearing caps or at least going back to wearing white in order to be distinguished from other hospital staff. Matt Laur said he had recently been in the hospital and that nurses are dressing much to casually. Hmmmmmm.......................
    So, does Dr. Snyderman propose that male nurses wear the same kind of cap as female nurses? That, I'd like to see!:roll :roll :roll
  10. by   nursesarah
    well....i watched the video. and i kinda agree with some of what she said.

    i dont think she was saying that nurse's need to go back to wearing the caps. what she was saying was that the caps set nurses apart. it made them distinctive. and now there's nothing like that. she stated that it was important to read the name tags and ask the person who they were. as for the "dressing casually" comment that matt lauer made...well i can see his point. i work with some nurses that come in to work with their hair messy, scrubs are wrinkled, and who generally dont look professional. this is compared to another nurse who comes in, scrubs looking neat and tidy, hair looking clean and tidy...looking professional. it does make a difference.

    also, i think the point she was getting at with regards to surgery was that it has to be clear what limb is being operated on. she didnt say that the patient should mark it themselves, but rather that the patient should make it clear along with the doctor, nurse, etc which limb. and one of them should be marked.

    also, she did state that it was partially the patients fault that the emergency room is in such a mess. and that it s not a walk in clinic and shouldnt be treated as such.

    i think i she did make some valid points. please dont flame me!!
  11. by   Antikigirl
    I personally think that all this stems from the fact that patients need to finally take an ACTIVE role in their care now a days, and not fully depend on healthcare staff to provide every little detail to them now. We have all had to swing with the trend of really educating our patients so that they may care for themselves at home and not make the hospital the primary source of healthcare needs.

    However, despite this trend...people are still sue happy, and still so caught up in the 'customer is always right' mindset where it isn't meshing well with actually teaching them how to care for themselves! Many of my patients still feel they wish for the nurse with the white cap...not to identify an RN, but to have that feeling of servitude (and I have asked!!!!) from the nurse. It is the old mindset...get sick or hurt...go to the ladies in the white dress and cap and all will be better! This mindset needs to stop if we are to continue with actually achieving in and out patient sucess!

    I have asked many patients and people outside and typically they respond about tasks onlys like bed baths, shots, feeding, wheelchairs, IV's, making coffee, and helping the doctor. And they feel safe around nurses because they are like a mom that are there to help them. But NEVER do they EVER say anything about being a professional...a real licensed professional! That chaps my hide, and I remind patients and others about this often...that nurses aren't little college grads that parade around catering to everyones needs under the direct thumb of an MD...that we are professionals, and actually have quite a bit of schooling behind our RNs so that we can ASSIST the doctor and other disiplines!

    The nurse persona is still very misunderstood, and this is why hints or even direct remarks towards healthcare errors go directly...almost instinctually towards the NURSES!

    A white outfit and cap are NOT going to fix this trend, and I don't belive the white coat is working for MD's either (since too many other disaplines use them too...like our student nurses, lab, RT, some PT, etc.).

    What we need is patients to be a little more aware of whom is working on them by asking, and always be curious about what is going on and ask questions. If they are unable then their Medical POA should be there (which I find they are usually not there are not to be found when I need them!).

    Healthcare teams must really introduce themselves clearly and have name badges that state their title in large letters and in simple terms! Too many of our nurses have RN and other titles on the badge that fill up room...a simple RN is easier to understand for patients or even NURSE (I have run into people that don't know MD or RN). I know we all earned our titles...but we don't go into pts rooms declairing them...why??? Too confusing so lets go simple with name badges!

    I agree with the colored scrubs...my patients don't even remember the color I was wearing vs the CNA...so that doesn't do much.

    I introduce myself as ____ Your nurse at the start...and "your nurse" throughout the day...unless they are forgetful then I will continue with ___ your nurse! We also have dry erase boards to write our names on and the cna's name too!

    OH well...I better get off my soap box too..LOL!
  12. by   MAP1
    Nursing - the biggest problem in our profession is the lack of respect - this is because no one understands our job. Shows such as Grey's Anatomy and House - never show nurses in critical roles. We all know how impossible it would be for the Docs alone to care for the patients but on TV that is what you see. Docs standing around a patient with many IV drip and on Vents and no nurse in the room. This is rediculous but the people who watch this do not see the exteme value of the nurse at the bedside. Errors occur - human nature - but short staffing and long hours certainly makes it easier to err
  13. by   LisaRn21
    Quote from jahra
    Hi Lisa,



    Before the internet and cell phones and all the other
    modern changes....

    When I was a child and young adult nurses were respected
    and the professional uniform was white and a nursing cap.
    Nurses worked very hard in those days.

    Kindly do not degrade the attire of the hard working
    nurses who have worked over the years in a nursing cap
    while caring for their patients.

    Nursing advanced to where it is today because of their
    commitment to patients and their assertiveness to change
    and advance the profession.

    Hi

    I was not disrespecting or degrading anyone. I was simply stating, if someone decides to demand I wear certain clothes especially a hat on my head I would quit. I don't feel the nurses who have worked over the years helped advance nursing to the profession it is today because of the clothes they wear... it was the caring nature, and the assertiveness. Please don't degrade me for having an opinion .. thank you

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