Survey: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortag - page 6

This month's survey Question: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage? Please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to... Read More

  1. by   CCU NRS
    Quote from lizz
    As always, thanks suzanne. I did not know that the new requirements hadn't gone into effect yet. That certainly explains all of these posts where people have been complaining about English proficiency.

    Hopefully, the new laws will help address that problem. Question: Do you know if the marriage exemption that you previously mentioned would also apply under these new laws?

    :spin:
    Really tho rerading & writing english are still very separate from a clear understandable voice
  2. by   talaxandra
    Quote from Rep
    Here in the Philippines, the government is not spending any single cent for our nursing education!
    With the number of ex-pat Fillipina nurses working in Australia and elsewhere, supply within your country must be diminishing. Do the Phillipine public know that there is a nursing drain from the Phillipines?
  3. by   fergus51
    I have known several nurses who passed english tests. Unfortunately, that doesn't mean they can actually function in healthcare with their level of fluency.
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from talaxandra
    With the number of ex-pat Fillipina nurses working in Australia and elsewhere, supply within your country must be diminishing. Do the Phillipine public know that there is a nursing drain from the Phillipines?

    There was a big discussion about that here a few months back. Basically there were several thoughts I got out of that discussion. One is yes, it's a drain on their nursing and health in their country. Two, that even though they have the nurses, their hospitals can't afford to or won't hire them, thus a surplus. Three that they are much like a nurse factory, providing English language BSN-trained nurses for nursing shortages throughout the world in order to send them out to make good money and send some of that money home. The amount of money the Filipino nurses send home to help their families is significant.
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from fergus51
    I have known several nurses who passed english tests. Unfortunately, that doesn't mean they can actually function in healthcare with their level of fluency.
    Quote from CCU NRS
    Really tho rerading & writing english are still very separate from a clear understandable voice
    Ok then, another question for suzanne4:

    What do these new requirements involve, and does it address any of the above mentioned concerns?

    My husband works for the state of California, and they pay extra if you learn Spanish. However, you have to take an oral exam, and actually speak with proficiency. I wonder if that would solve the problem here, and if it should be or, is already, required?

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 3, '04
  6. by   grneiis
    [QUOTE=brian]This month's survey Question:

    Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage?
    Brian: I am interested in how this survey comes out. When will it be completed? I am doing my thesis on brain drain and international nurse recrutiment. Also, no I do not think nurses should be recruited to aid in the US nursing shortage. International nurse recruitment is a symptom of our present shortage, not the answer. We need to work on why there is a shortage, i.e. wages, working conditions, etc. Although I am all for individual freedom, taking nurses from other countries is not the answer. It only drains human resouces from developing countries who are already compromised. Furthermore, those countries deserve some type of compensation for their loss .-grneiis
    Last edit by grneiis on Jun 3, '04
  7. by   grneiis
    [QUOTE=brian]This month's survey Question:

    Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage?



    [font='Times New Roman']There is projected to be 400,000 (Reilly, 2003) vacant nursing positions in the US over the next 10 years. Yes, we probably do have a shortage as the nursing population is aging and the average age of today's nurse is around 45 years old. Also, who will teach the new nurses-there is a shortage of professors. International nurse recruitment is not the answer to our problems-grneiis
  8. by   cwernc
    undefinedundefinedundefined
    Quote from brian
    this month's survey question:

    should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage?

    please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to this topic to post any comments that you may have on the topic.
    all

    foreign nurses are not the issue, our lack of working nurses is. there are nurses brought over fronm the phillapines that are here for a year, all expenses paid, prior to them starting jobs. they are supported by the hospitals they will work for. why is no one acting on inactive nurses? why is no one looking at disabled nurses. i am disabled and work full time from a chair.
  9. by   grneiis
    Quote from cwernc
    undefinedundefinedundefined


    foreign nurses are not the issue, our lack of working nurses is. there are nurses brought over fronm the phillapines that are here for a year, all expenses paid, prior to them starting jobs. they are supported by the hospitals they will work for. why is no one acting on inactive nurses? why is no one looking at disabled nurses. i am disabled and work full time from a chair.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


    [font=book antiqua]i believe the issue is the fact that foreign nurses are not the answer, international nurse recruitment is a symptom of a much greater problem and the problem is a lack of nurses to fill the needs and future needs of this country. we are already lacking nursing educators (professors) and with an aging nurse population -this is a futher concern. who will teach our youth? think about this, it[font='times new roman'] was discovered that many foreign nurses working in the united states were earning lower wages than their american peers (reilly). alarming as this could ultimately lead to lower wages for united states nurses. not good. [font=book antiqua] in addition, & i am sure you would agree, brain drain is ethically wrong. it further compromises other countries, esp. developing ones ([font='times new roman']principle of [font='times new roman']distributive justice). why does anyone need to look at disabled nurses or those nurse who are not currently working? if they want to work, they can. however, perhaps something is holding them back...poor working conditions? poor wages? again, international nurse recruitment is not the answer-we need to look at why the nurses are not working and what we can do to reverse that.
    [font=book antiqua][font='times new roman'][font='times new roman']-grneiis
  10. by   cwernc
    OK, now I am angry. I am a disabled nurse and it took me 18 months to find a job. Those nurses with visible disabilities, canes, scooters etc are not even considered. It is not the fact that they don't want to work, go to the site DisabledNursesandHeathcareProfessionals.yahoo.com and read the stories, read the experiences in trying to get a job, before you judge us.

    This is a perfect example of what we run up agaainst, if you want to work, go to work. Well, the truth is if you want to work get a recruiter to see you , not the disability.
  11. by   kwilkinson30
    I too agree there is not as much a nursing shortage as a lack of willingness by the hospitals to pay for and support our local nurses. I have nothing against traveling nurses or international nurses (I actually enjoy working with them) but I do feel that if the hospitals paid the nurses on staff even 70% of the amount they have to pay the travelers and their agencies that more nurses would remain loyal to the facility.
  12. by   grneiis
    Quote from cwernc
    OK, now I am angry. I am a disabled nurse and it took me 18 months to find a job. Those nurses with visible disabilities, canes, scooters etc are not even considered. It is not the fact that they don't want to work, go to the site DisabledNursesandHeathcareProfessionals.yahoo.com and read the stories, read the experiences in trying to get a job, before you judge us.

    This is a perfect example of what we run up agaainst, if you want to work, go to work. Well, the truth is if you want to work get a recruiter to see you , not the disability.
    I dont mean to anger you, what about the ADA? And I am not judging you. Anger will not accomplish anything.
  13. by   grneiis
    Quote from kwilkinson30
    I too agree there is not as much a nursing shortage as a lack of willingness by the hospitals to pay for and support our local nurses. I have nothing against traveling nurses or international nurses (I actually enjoy working with them) but I do feel that if the hospitals paid the nurses on staff even 70% of the amount they have to pay the travelers and their agencies that more nurses would remain loyal to the facility.
    Agree, it is hard to work next to someone who is 1. has no loyalities to the facility 2. making much more $$ than yourself. Distrubing.

close