Snow Days.... - page 8

by Kareylea

9,416 Views | 76 Comments

Well I'm in the South and I'm a floor nurse. We had a little winter storm in and I had to call in today because of the weather (all the roads are closed) and got officially reamed by my boss. Apparently, I was supposed to go in... Read More


  1. 2
    Quote from perfectbluebuildings
    i can see both sides of this issue. i am also in a southern state hard hit by this recent storm, and also not nearly as well equipped as more northern states to deal with this kind of weather (though our dept of transportation people have been working very hard!) it is as much as possible our responsibility to get there as scheduled if at all possible, and to plan ahead for weather emergencies. i have never called in because of weather. always been able to find a way to get there. (have learned a lot about winter driving this year!!) but sometimes, that is not possible for some people in certain situations, and i think there should be some leeway.

    i guess i just want to revisit a question one poster asked a few pages ago that i haven't seen other opinions on. what should be the cut-off? i.e. how early should you go into work to avoid a snowstorm? for example, if a snowstorm is predicted to come on, say, a monday night and your next scheduled workday is wednesday or thursday morning, but the snow still isn't cleared by then, should you have gone in before the storm on monday? i'm really wondering how more northern cities & states deal with this issue every winter- do you have some kind of system? that may seem like a stupid question, but it's a genuine one. we usually have maybe one big storm a year, that doesn't amount to much and is gone by that afternoon or the next, so i'm not used to this kind of thing. thanks-
    it depends upon the northern state. when i lived in wisconsin, the snowplows were out as soon as the first snow flurries started, and they kept going until all the major roads were clear. if you couldn't get your car out, you walked, snowmobiled or cross country skied to the nearest plowed road and the hospital would have someone pick you up. (they were much better about picking you up before your shift than they were about taking you home afterward!) when i lived in boston there was so much snow one year that the national guard came and picked us up with snow cats. we stayed at the hospital for the duration. i've skied to work more than once . . . those who didn't make it in were regarded as shirkers and sissies.

    i'd go in to work the night before if there was a snowstorm predicted overnight, but i wouldn't go in more than 24 hours early!
  2. 3
    Quote from OCNRN63
    I'm sorry, but I think it is unreasonable to expect an employee to pay for a hotel room, even if it's at a discounted rate. If the hospital wants employees to make the effort to come in during inclement weather, they should pony up for the hotel rooms.

    I'll never forget the accommodations I got at one facility where I worked during a major snow event: a pillow, a blanket and a conference room which was shared by several of us nurses. Yes, we slept on the floor. Yes, it was cold. Yes, it was uncomfortable. No, they did not give us any food.
    I don't think it is unreasonable to expect employees to do whatever is necessary in extreme conditions. Besides, we had SUCH a good time, and I'd much prefer a hotel room to a stretcher or the floor! The hotel was nice, and the rate was less than $100. Not a big deal IMO. In any event, if i didn't think i could meet my employers expectations, or i found them objectionable, I guess I'd look for work elsewhere. Pretty simple.
    tablefor9, wooh, and Ruby Vee like this.
  3. 8
    Reminds me of the time a hurricane was expected (didn't arrive).

    Staff was supposed to come in and bring enough food and bottled water with them for 72 hours.

    I figure if they want people there for 72 hours they can at least provide the food and water.

    I think the younger generation that does not put the job ahead of their life has it right.

    As opposed to the old martyr, the patient always comes first way of thinking.

    I was that way once, but not anymore.

    What do you get for it?

    As someone else said, work your fingers to the bone and what do you get, bony fingers.
    none the wiser, SBarn, canigraduate, and 5 others like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from Mulan
    I think the younger generation that does not put the job ahead of their life has it right.

    As opposed to the old martyr, the patient always comes first way of thinking.

    I was that way once, but not anymore.

    What do you get for it?

    Ummmm, continued employment???
    nurse0520 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    Ummmm, continued employment???

    Hasn't been a problem.
  6. 2
    Just came back in and read all the posts following my earlier one. I'll admit, "nag" was strong, and I apologize, but I was hot when I read all the posts that were so negative to the OP.

    Unless you live in a southern state, it's really hard to understand the physical impossibility of driving in the ice/snow (usually ice). It's terrifying and very dangerous. We don't have the resources available to the northern states that get a lot of snow. Just like Kansas doesn't prepare for hurricanes, y'know?

    And I don't mind staying late to cover another shift. I've done it many times when census has been up. But I don't find it necessary to risk my life to get to work. I don't work in any capacity that is remotely life-saving, so it just isn't that important to me. When I become a nurse and it actually matters on a life-and-death level, then I may have a different attitude. Right now, I would rather stay on for a double than have a coworker risk their life.

    I'm not saying that preparation and common sense aren't good things, I think they're wonderful. I personally was very prepared. I'm just saying sometimes no amount of preparation is going to help you, especially in rural areas.

    We had close to an inch-thick sheet of solid ice on most secondary roads on Tuesday morning. I didn't leave the house except to walk the dogs and I busted my tail twice doing that. I still have ice a quarter of an inch thick around my house. And we didn't get it that bad where I am compared to surrounding counties.

    Hopefully I've offered a little perspective on the difficulties southern states have so you can better understand where the OP is coming from.
    sevensonnets and Mulan like this.
  7. 4
    Quote from Mulan
    Reminds me of the time a hurricane was expected (didn't arrive).

    Staff was supposed to come in and bring enough food and bottled water with them for 72 hours.

    I figure if they want people there for 72 hours they can at least provide the food and water.

    I think the younger generation that does not put the job ahead of their life has it right.

    As opposed to the old martyr, the patient always comes first way of thinking.

    I was that way once, but not anymore.

    What do you get for it?

    As someone else said, work your fingers to the bone and what do you get, bony fingers.
    There is a disconnect someplace, b/c this does not represent my attitude at all. I'm not a martyr. I'm an adult, and a professional. I keep my commitments, and I expect others to do the same. To tell the truth, the patients are irrelevant to the equation. It is a matter of personal honor. If I tell you something, you know it to be true, and that includes where I'm going to be when. I think people who know me value that character trait, and I'm proud to demonstrate it consistently and to have a reputation that reflects such.
    Ruby Vee, wooh, tablefor9, and 1 other like this.


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