Smelly Co-Worker - page 11

What would you all do about a co-worker with an odor problem? This gal LOOKS clean but she smells BAD. The beginning of the shift is fine, the middle of the shift and things get bad. I see her... Read More

  1. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from Bipley
    This odor has been a problem for months and months.

    While I KNOW the odor you refer to (AAAAAAHHHHHHH) this isn't it. But I do understand your point about a need for an MD visit.
    Again, I say what are ya gonna do?
  2. by   Bipley
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    So what are you going to do Bipley?
    I am going to suck it up, take her to lunch, and have a chat. I am going to be direct and to the point but I'm going to do my best to accomplish this in a manner that is clinical and friendly. I'm going to talk to her as a nurse and her new friend.

    We aren't close friend by any means, but due to circumstances we may become closer friends than I expected.

    I'm still exceedingly concerned about my approach, but I'm working on memorizing the script posted earlier.
  3. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from Bipley
    I am going to suck it up, take her to lunch, and have a chat. I am going to be direct and to the point but I'm going to do my best to accomplish this in a manner that is clinical and friendly. I'm going to talk to her as a nurse and her new friend.

    We aren't close friend by any means, but due to circumstances we may become closer friends than I expected.

    I'm still exceedingly concerned about my approach, but I'm working on memorizing the script posted earlier.
    Sounds good. I think she will appreciate it. Worse case scenerio is she gets mad, but you describe her as very nice, I think at the most she'll be embarrassed, but at least she can look into getting the problem fixed. Hey, I just thought of an idea. Does she have any family you know of? Maybe a daughter ( a son would be sticky). You never mentioned how old she was. I think maybe it would be easier on her if a family member told her. My mom and sister have told me private things about myself and it was not so bad coming from them.
  4. by   LPN1974
    Although treatment is available which quickly cures bacterial vaginosis, if left untreated bacterial vaginosis may increase a woman's risk of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), endometritis, cervicitis, pregnancy complications, and post-operative infections among other health conditions.

    http://womenshealth.about.com/cs/vag...erialvagin.htm


    You said this has been going on for months and months. I sure hope she gets it cleared up soon, she may suffer from some very difficult complications if it is BV.
  5. by   Bipley
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    Sounds good. I think she will appreciate it. Worse case scenerio is she gets mad, but you describe her as very nice, I think at the most she'll be embarrassed, but at least she can look into getting the problem fixed. Hey, I just thought of an idea. Does she have any family you know of? Maybe a daughter ( a son would be sticky). You never mentioned how old she was. I think maybe it would be easier on her if a family member told her. My mom and sister have told me private things about myself and it was not so bad coming from them.
    I don't know her well but I don't think she'll be angry. I do think she will be embarrassed and that makes me feel bad before I even talk to her.

    If she has family, she never mentions them. I'm not sure I'd feel right about going to a family member, involving anyone unnecessary seems counter-productive. I guess I'm thinking about privacy issues. I wouldn't want others talking about my stench, you know? Even family! If my sis told me I stink I'd probably kick her extra hard in the shin by accident.

    Thus... my tact skills! LOL
  6. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Bipley
    I'm pretty sure she already knows there is an odor just by her behaviors. Also, in front of folks? That wouldn't be nice.
    You previously said that your coworker runs to the bathroom with Mitchum antiperspirant frequently and has been seen with a canister of FDS feminine deodorant spray in her purse.

    No woman carries those 2 items on their person to work daily unless they know they have body odor. This woman absolutely knows she has B.O. if she carries Mitchum and FDS to work on a daily basis. Most 'normal' people leave their deodorant and self-care products at home after the daily grooming has been done.
  7. by   Bipley
    Quote from TheCommuter
    You previously said that your coworker runs to the bathroom with Mitchum antiperspirant frequently and has been seen with a canister of FDS feminine deodorant spray in her purse.

    No woman carries those 2 items on their person to work daily unless they know they have body odor. This woman absolutely knows she has B.O. if she carries Mitchum and FDS to work on a daily basis. Most 'normal' people leave their deodorant and self-care products at home after the daily grooming has been done.
    Commuter...

    I'm not sure that is fair. This nurse IS normal, she simply has a problem. That's all, nothing abnormal about her person, just her physical problem.
  8. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Bipley
    Commuter...

    I'm not sure that is fair. This nurse IS normal, she simply has a problem. That's all, nothing abnormal about her person, just her physical problem.
    By no means was I indicating that she was mentally abnormal. However, wouldn't you agree that there's definitely something abnormal with her physiologic process 'down there'? That's what I mean by saying she's not 'normal'. No one should be able to smell your perineal area from a distance.
  9. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Bipley
    I am going to suck it up, take her to lunch, and have a chat. I am going to be direct and to the point but I'm going to do my best to accomplish this in a manner that is clinical and friendly. I'm going to talk to her as a nurse and her new friend.

    We aren't close friend by any means, but due to circumstances we may become closer friends than I expected.

    I'm still exceedingly concerned about my approach, but I'm working on memorizing the script posted earlier.
    buy her a few drinks first...that ought to loosen things up a bit


    oh...I am only kidding.

    I think you have a great approach. It really will show her that you are concerned about her. You will do just fine! I have nothing but faith in you!
  10. by   Bipley
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    buy her a few drinks first...that ought to loosen things up a bit


    oh...I am only kidding.

    I think you have a great approach. It really will show her that you are concerned about her. You will do just fine! I have nothing but faith in you!
    ASW...

    You are basing this on YOUR skills in tact. Let us not forget about MY skills in tact.

    I'm seriously worried about this. I'm going to do it because it is the right thing to do, but I'm not the least bit afraid to say I'll be glad when it is over.
  11. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Bipley
    ASW...

    You are basing this on YOUR skills in tact. Let us not forget about MY skills in tact.

    I'm seriously worried about this. I'm going to do it because it is the right thing to do, but I'm not the least bit afraid to say I'll be glad when it is over.
    I can understand you are nervous...that is coming for your immense amount of compassion and concern for her emotional wellbeing. So #1 we know your heart is in the right place.

    #2 let's face this head on. She is going to be embarrassed no matter how sweetly you explain it to her. You could bring her roses, sing to her, and beat around the bush for two hours...but it's not going to make it easier.

    #3 you are a healthcare worker. You are TRAINED in being non-judgemental and caring, looking out for the patient's psychosocial well being (yes I know certain nurses do not USE their training, but they are trained non-the-less in this aspect)

    And finally, you have received some very good advice to which you had some fantastic responses. You have a whole crew of people on this board that believe in you. I know you can do it. I know you want to make it as easy as possible.....but there is no real easy way to do it, I am afraid. You will do just fine. The more you stress about it, the more likely you will be to overdo it. Good Luck (and I will be praying for ya if its allright )

    Brittney
  12. by   Bipley
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I can understand you are nervous...that is coming for your immense amount of compassion and concern for her emotional wellbeing. So #1 we know your heart is in the right place.

    #2 let's face this head on. She is going to be embarrassed no matter how sweetly you explain it to her. You could bring her roses, sing to her, and beat around the bush for two hours...but it's not going to make it easier.

    #3 you are a healthcare worker. You are TRAINED in being non-judgemental and caring, looking out for the patient's psychosocial well being (yes I know certain nurses do not USE their training, but they are trained non-the-less in this aspect)

    And finally, you have received some very good advice to which you had some fantastic responses. You have a whole crew of people on this board that believe in you. I know you can do it. I know you want to make it as easy as possible.....but there is no real easy way to do it, I am afraid. You will do just fine. The more you stress about it, the more likely you will be to overdo it. Good Luck (and I will be praying for ya if its allright )

    Brittney
    I have to give you and the rest of the board credit for one issue, I really didn't have the slightest idea how to speak to this nurse. I didn't know how to approach the issue. I didn't know what to say. Now, I do.

    I'll let everyone know how it goes. We work together tomorrow. I'll set a lunch date. (AAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH I'm not scer'ed... reallllllllly!)
  13. by   Simba&NalasMom
    Bipley,

    Just wanted to say that you are a wonderful example of what every nurse should be...compassionate and caring.

    :kiss

close