Should teachers be CPR certified? - page 2

I was wondering if any of you think that teachers should be certified in CPR. A little girl in a neighboring town died last month while at school. My friend, who is a paramedic, said that chances... Read More

  1. by   P_RN
    I thought they were too. There is a good samaritan law in this state.
  2. by   ShortFuse_LPN
    I don't know all the details in the case involving the little girl. I do know that the school involved only has a nurse there @ lunchtime to administer meds. The secretary "handles" things that come up.
    I also realize that the school budget may not be able to include the CPR training but I also think (hope) there would be some way to get it done.
  3. by   deespoohbear
    Originally posted by fab4fan

    Adding another responsibility like CPR just increases their liability. I agree, it would bring out the ambulance chasers. Then what next...since nurses are being cut back, what will the next medical task be that will be relegated to the teachers.

    If my kids were in the school system I definitely would want the teachers to know BLS.

    I do think teachers should at least know CPR and basic first aid. Like I posted and a few others, schools are cutting their budgets to the bones and the nursing staff is the first "luxury" to get the axe in most schools. Precious minutes will be wasted if the adults are just standing around waiting for EMS to arrive. Even if a nurse is present in the building he or she could be minutes away from where the arrest is occurring. We all know that seconds count when someone is not getting enough blood and oxygen to support life to their vital organs. I would be pretty upset if my kid was the one arresting and no adults who care for kids day in and day out did not have a flippin' clue of what to do to try and save the life of my child.
    Last edit by deespoohbear on Mar 18, '03
  4. by   NurseGirlKaren
    Dees--there's no question the nurse should be CPR certified, it's the teachers that are in question as to whether or not they should be CPR certified.
  5. by   deespoohbear
    Originally posted by NurseGirlKaren
    Dees--there's no question the nurse should be CPR certified, it's the teachers that are in question as to whether or not they should be CPR certified.
    Yep, I just realize my screw up...I went back and amended my post. Sorry if I upset anyone...too much Robitussin with codiene in me right now....(making note to myself: do not post in haste and especially when under the influence of drugs.... ).

    Again, I am sorry if I stepped on any toes....I really didn't mean too.....
  6. by   TracyB,RN
    The firefighter that taught my CPR class said that only 50% of people who receive CPR will survive. Don't know if that is an accurate statistic or not, just something to think about.
    The grammar school & high school I went to did not have a school nurse.
    I would sure love it for teachers to know CPR AND be covered by the Good Sam act.
    I would rather have a half assed attempt rather than no attempt at all.
  7. by   valk
    I am a school nurse & AHA BLS instructor. I can't imagine a school nurse not being certified in BLS

    In New York State legislation was passed requiring at least one AED in eachs school in May of 2002. Unfortunately New York City received an exemption from the law in December due to lack of funds to purchase the AEDs.

    Pennsylvania & Delaware have similar legislation requiring AEDs in schools. Not sure about other states.

    Usually these laws are brought about after a child dies in school & the child's family lobbies for the AEDs to prevent another death.
  8. by   memphispanda
    Teachers already have an awful lot on their plates. If the paperwork nightmare would slow down for them, then maybe it would be reasonable to ask one more thing of them, but otherwise...it would be nice, but not another requirement. I have watched too many of my family members teach to even think about adding to what's already necessary.

    I am a former preschool teacher, and we did NOT have to be CPR certified. What was required was that there always had to be present in the facility someone who was CPR certified. Never mind that you might be in the Gym while the CPR certified person was way back down a hall in a different building.
  9. by   deespoohbear
    Originally posted by BelindaLPN
    I also realize that the school budget may not be able to include the CPR training but I also think (hope) there would be some way to get it done.

    I doubt if most school budgets could withstand the press and monetary costs of a multi-million dollar lawsuit that stems from a student dying because no one knew CPR and the nurse (if there is even one) is not immediately available. Seems like it would be a heck of a lot more cost effective to get a majority of the staff certified...
  10. by   RNonsense
    IMHO I think anyone who is around/supervises children should be trained in CPR and basic first aid for choking, etc.
  11. by   susanmary
    Originally posted by deespoohbear
    I doubt if most school budgets could withstand the press and monetary costs of a multi-million dollar lawsuit that stems from a student dying because no one knew CPR and the nurse (if there is even one) is not immediately available. Seems like it would be a heck of a lot more cost effective to get a majority of the staff certified...
    Exactly what happened to the school system in a city close by. I believe there wasn't a school nurse present -- nurses were split between schools. Kid choked on a hot dog & ended up dying -- no one either knew the heimlich/or did it correctly -- I can't remember. HUGE liability & lawsuit. Ended up with RN in every school. Again, this is soooo sad.
  12. by   deespoohbear
    Originally posted by susanmary
    Exactly what happened to the school system in a city close by. I believe there wasn't a school nurse present -- nurses were split between schools. Kid choked on a hot dog & ended up dying -- no one either knew the heimlich/or did it correctly -- I can't remember. HUGE liability & lawsuit. Ended up with RN in every school. Again, this is soooo sad.
    Too bad that it takes a child dying for something as basic as nursing care to be implemented in every school building. Then add in students who are diabetic, asthmatic, allergic to different stimuli (like say, PEANUTS?). And then you have the children with severe medical problems such as CP, autism, and other diseases and disorders. How on earth can a school board expect the school secretary/principal/teacher be adequately equipped to deal with such situations. It would be like asking me to teach an algebra class (now that would be funny!!) or writing out an educational plan for students. Maybe cutting out some of the high priced salaries that the administrators and other top dogs in the school corp make and providing adequate nursing care and decent teachers for the students would be a good place to start.
  13. by   Enabled
    Our children are a most precious gift. They are our future leaders. I think every school should have teachers certified. If it comes down to one being designated there is going to be a few more needed for back up in the event the primary person is unable to preform. Do teachers require credits for licensure and maintaining there certification? If so this should be tacked on as a necessity. Also, many fire departments will give instructions over the phone that may have helped but at least something was being done. Its true that most of the time we hear about changes is after some terrible tragedy has happened. We need to push for teachers also to be certified. I do also include this with anyone who works in groups as someone else has said. A friend of mine voluteers a couple of hours a week in a private home with patients with dimentia and as part of her "volunteer" discription required that she be CPR certified. It isn't that difficult and it only takes a few hours. Who knows someone might be saving your child and I yours or even you saving your own.
    My niece had a friend stay with her with a new baby boy. Joshua was born with a cleft lip and palate and was gaining weight and doing well. A few days after Thanksgiving a couple of years ago the baby's mom went in to check on him as he had not cried for feeding. Well, unfortunately there was aspirate on the bed. My niece and then my sister began CPR immediately but unfortunately it was ruled a SIDS and the did find a heart defect. My sister also an RN insisted that if any of her children had children that they were to be certified in basic CPR. As a matter of fact the prenatal classes also had it as a part of their program at a local hospital.
    In addition to school nurses and coaches why can't high school teenagers have it as part of the PE classes and they just might save someone. Unfortunately, there are too few individuals who are not certified. I just checked my card and I had better sign up for renewal.

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