Should RNs do housekeeping job or is it our job? - page 3

:angryfire Wanted to ask if anyone experienced similar situation and how the issue was handled. 1st of all let me mention that I work for a huge hospital that is considered to be one of the top... Read More

  1. by   Lenap
    Another thought: I guess the hospital would have to hire dozen more housekeepers for each shift if they were to clean up after pt's accidents. (our hospital apx 800 beds)! Cheaper to let nurses do a little extra work.
    Ever wonder how good of a disinfecting job housekeepers do? I have seen 3 different patients develop MRSA in the same private room-just a coincidence? Some thought the room was cursed. I doubt that.:uhoh21:
  2. by   Tweety
    My sister had a baby in a military hospital a long while back. She had to make her own bed, and go to a common cafeteria to eat, get her own food and bus her table. I think that's an excellent idea. Let the patients clean up their own poop if they have an accident.
  3. by   Jailhouse RN
    Tell housekeeping to get the lead out.
  4. by   mattsmom81
    This is another example of the nursing dept picking up the slack for another dept...also note other threads here discussing nurses doing Rt and Lab duties. Too many facilities think nursing's job is to pinch hit for every other dept off hours. But...where is our share of their budget $$$ that's what I want to know.

    I agree with the point of our prioritizing of duties...if we are so busy tasking with basic housekeeping duties and other depts work, what are we neglecting on the nursing front?? If we allow other entities to define our profession, they will (and they are)
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I don't recall anyone saying that cleaning comes before pt. needs.

    I also think of this: if the confused pt. rips their IV out, blood squirting on the floor and they walk on through it, creates a wet floor (in as little as 30 seconds). And then after the nurse assesses the pt., gets them back in bed, settled, etc. and leaves that mess on the floor for housekeeping to clean up (putting a 'wet floor' sign up and a towel over the puddle), the pt. in less than 15 seconds (remember, they're confused) gets back up, busts their butt on the blood-towel floor, breaks a bone, etc. guess who's blamed? The nurse, who had gone to the desk to page housekeeping to room 31. And i say 'blamed' because the family of that pt. filed a complaint of negligence, and put her at fault.

    This happened back in January on night shift on the floor i used to work on. And the housekeeper had gone up 11 flights of stairs and came thought the fire door a couple minutes later. Anything can happen.
  6. by   fergus51
    Marie, I think that's different that a hospital that just has a blanket policy of making nurses clean the mess and housekeeping just disinfecting. In the situation you described, a nurse would have to do some housekeeping duties to keep a patient safe. That's different from expecting nurses to always clean up rather than staffing the hospital with housekeeping personnel.
  7. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from mattsmom81
    this is another example of the nursing dept picking up the slack for another dept...also note other threads here discussing nurses doing rt and lab duties. too many facilities think nursing's job is to pinch hit for every other dept off hours. but...where is our share of their budget $$$ that's what i want to know.

    i agree with the point of our prioritizing of duties...if we are so busy tasking with basic housekeeping duties and other depts work, what are we neglecting on the nursing front?? if we allow other entities to define our profession, they will (and they are)
    this is so true mattsmom! and we allow it. nurses allow themselves to be suckered right into it with the "well if your patient needs this to be done, what kind of nurse are you if you don't just automatically do it." my response to this pile of malarky is "that would be why i'm not the only employee in the hospital! if i am the only person in this hospital who will do these things, sign everyone else's budget directly over to me, please. if the other departments are here for a reason, however, please tell them to do their jobs"
  8. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from fergus51
    Marie, I think that's different that a hospital that just has a blanket policy of making nurses clean the mess and housekeeping just disinfecting. In the situation you described, a nurse would have to do some housekeeping duties to keep a patient safe. That's different from expecting nurses to always clean up rather than staffing the hospital with housekeeping personnel.
    ITA fergus,
    I have no problem with cleaning up a safety hazard (heck, I'd probably be the one to fall in it if I didn't), but just cleaning up a room full of crap or vomit just because housekeeping doesn't want to touch the yucky stuff...not this nurse.
  9. by   fergus51
    Quote from RN4NICU
    ITA fergus,
    I have no problem with cleaning up a safety hazard (heck, I'd probably be the one to fall in it if I didn't), but just cleaning up a room full of crap or vomit just because housekeeping doesn't want to touch the yucky stuff...not this nurse.
    AMEN my NICU sister!!! Maybe that's why us NICU nurses have the reputation of being harda$$ed
  10. by   Farkinott
    Ditto!! :angryfire :angryfire
  11. by   flashpoint
    Here, we clean up the bulk and housekeeping disinfects. We have to make sure that all visible blood, etc is gone before they clean up. They do the rooms, bed, and anything that stays in patient rooms, but the nurses do all of the equipment like IV poles and pumps and things like that. Their argument is that we are better trained at cleaning up things like emesis and that they are afraid of harming the equipment if they wipe it off with a cloth with disinfectant on it.

    Our housekeepers are very good to us and they have a cleaning cart all prepared for the night shift...that way, we can mop or clean the carpet or polish the stainless steel on the bedside stands if we need to.
  12. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from cotjockey
    Their argument is that we are better trained at cleaning up things like emesis and that they are afraid of harming the equipment if they wipe it off with a cloth with disinfectant on it.
    I think I'd sweetly offer to give them an inservice...

    Would the equipment be less harmed if nurses wiped it off with a cloth with disinfectant on it? Must be that magic Nightingale touch...

    Harda$$ed NICU nurse and PROUD OF IT!!!
  13. by   susanna
    What a good thread. This site becomes more and more useful for me every day. Like, no nursing director would tell me that it would be in my expected job duties to do most of the heavy duty cleaning in patient rooms every day. Its really good to know this stuff before you start a career in this field.
    Thanks guys.

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