Should I Carry Malpractice (Liability) Insurance? - pg.2 | allnurses

Should I Carry Malpractice (Liability) Insurance? - page 2

This question comes up frequently and is asked of me quite often, "should I carry malpractice insurance?" Many nurses are covered under their own individual liability insurance carrier. Many more are... Read More

  1. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
    3
    I sometimes hear people say, "I've got nothing for them to take so I don't need insurance."

    My response is, "Ah, but you do have something for them to go after... you have your future earnings as a nurse once you graduate. Unless you want to live underground, they can and will garnish your wages to satisfy the judgment."

    The lawyers from the hospital's insurer are out to limit THEIR liability and if they think they can do so by tossing a nurse to the lions, that's what's going to happen. Me, I want my own insurer with lawyers whose duty is to defend me. $100-200 per year is cheap insurance, indeed.
    SuesquatchRN, sirI, and Keysnurse2008 like this.
  2. Visit  DroogieRN profile page
    1
    I just finished my first year of NS and it was recommended that we purchase it prior to our first clinical last fall. I got it through NSO for $29. I was told that you can be sued down the line for something that occurs while you are a student, and if you didn't have coverage for that time, whatever insurance you later purchase can't help you.
    sirI likes this.
  3. Visit  Keysnurse2008 profile page
    1
    Siri,
    Is there any particular areas of practice you would specifically recommend attain malpractice insurance? Ones that you feel should definitely be covered outside their employers carrier?
    sirI likes this.
  4. Visit  sirI profile page
    2
    Quote from tnnurse
    Siri,
    Is there any particular areas of practice you would specifically recommend attain malpractice insurance? Ones that you feel should definitely be covered outside their employers carrier?
    Hello, tnnurse

    All areas are vulnerable. Patients and their attorneys are not selective with their lawsuits. I see a lot of LTC, ED, NICU, and OB cases. A few Med-Surg, OR, and MICU cases.

    Check out this blog entry Litigious Areas of Nursing and the Nurse's Liability for some additional information.
    chexycat and SuesquatchRN like this.
  5. Visit  CTPCTstudent profile page
    1
    Can you give a link or something of where to find the insurance coverage that you got?
    sirI likes this.
  6. Visit  sirI profile page
    1
    Hello, CTPCTstudent,

    In the first post, I gave a list of several Liability carriers.

    I use NSO - www.nso.com. You can get free online quotes.
    ajmclean likes this.
  7. Visit  CTPCTstudent profile page
    1
    Sorry...I didn't see that post
    sirI likes this.
  8. Visit  elkpark profile page
    14
    Quote from tnnurse
    Siri,
    Is there any particular areas of practice you would specifically recommend attain malpractice insurance? Ones that you feel should definitely be covered outside their employers carrier?
    To me, it's not a matter of what area of nursing you work in -- it's a matter of whether you trust your employer to protect your interests (beyond protecting their own) if the doo-doo hits the fan. I do not. I worked as a hospital surveyor for my state and the Feds for several years, and saw, firsthand, in the course of investigating complaints against hospitals and suspicious deaths/injuries, many employers throw individual RNs under the bus in order to protect the facility -- this is what their attorneys (the ones who would also be advising you if you depend on your employer) tell them to do -- when it was often quite obvious, from reviewing the records and interviewing the parties involved, that the only thing the RN had done wrong was have the bad luck to be assigned to that particular client on that particular day ... The hospitals would single out one or more RNs they could "blame" for the incident, and then promptly fire them to show their good faith ("golly, we had no idea we had such a dangerous and incompetent nurse on our staff! We fired her as soon as we figured it out. 'cause we're doing everything we can to run a first-class operation here!") Guess what -- once Nurse X has been blamed and fired, she's no longer covered by the employer's insurance -- she's dangling in the wind by herself. If she doesn't already have her own coverage and the situation ends up with her needing legal representation, she'll have to pay the attorney out of pocket, because there is no way to get coverage after the fact for an incident that has already happened. And, if you ever find yourself in that situation, the first hour with an attorney will cost you a lot more than the annual insurance premium for the vast majority of RNs ...

    My father was an MD and cautioned me while I was still in nursing school to never depend on an employer to protect me, and to never practice without my own, personal coverage. Everything I've seen in 25 years of practice since then has just reinforced to me what good advice that was.

    Beyond what sirI has already discussed, personal liability coverage will also provide legal representation if you ever have to defend your license before the BON (which your employer probably would not), and provides coverage if you want to work as a volunteer somewhere (your church, local homeless shelter, disaster relief, etc.) -- which your employer's coverage definitely will not; you're only covered by your employer during the actual time you are working for them at their facility.

    I'm another of those nurses that would never consider working a single day without my own coverage. I can't believe, after all these years, that there is still any discussion or controversy about the topic.
    jupitercrash, llib, talaxandra, and 11 others like this.
  9. Visit  sirI profile page
    0
    No problem, CTPCTstudent.

    Glad you brought it up again. It bears repeating.
  10. Visit  sirI profile page
    0
    Quote from elkpark
    To me, it's not a matter of what area of nursing you work in -- it's a matter of whether you trust your employer to protect your interests (beyond protecting their own) if the doo-doo hits the fan. I do not. I worked as a hospital surveyor for my state and the Feds for several years, and saw, firsthand, in the course of investigating complaints against hospitals and suspicious deaths/injuries, many employers throw individual RNs under the bus in order to protect the facility -- this is what their attorneys (the ones who would also be advising you if you depend on your employer) tell them to do -- when it was often quite obvious, from reviewing the records and interviewing the parties involved, that the only thing the RN had done wrong was have the bad luck to be assigned to that particular client on that particular day ... The hospitals would single out one or more RNs they could "blame" for the incident, and then promptly fire them to show their good faith ("golly, we had no idea we had such a dangerous and incompetent nurse on our staff! We fired her as soon as we figured it out. 'cause we're doing everything we can to run a first-class operation here!") Guess what -- once Nurse X has been blamed and fired, she's no longer covered by the employer's insurance -- she's dangling in the wind by herself. If she doesn't already have her own coverage and the situation ends up with her needing legal representation, she'll have to pay the attorney out of pocket, because there is no way to get coverage after the fact for an incident that has already happened. And, if you ever find yourself in that situation, the first hour with an attorney will cost you a lot more than the annual insurance premium for the vast majority of RNs ...

    My father was an MD and cautioned me while I was still in nursing school to never depend on an employer to protect me, and to never practice without my own, personal coverage. Everything I've seen in 25 years of practice since then has just reinforced to me what good advice that was.

    Beyond what sirI has already discussed, personal liability coverage will also provide legal representation if you ever have to defend your license before the BON (which your employer probably would not), and provides coverage if you want to work as a volunteer somewhere (your church, local homeless shelter, disaster relief, etc.) -- which your employer's coverage definitely will not; you're only covered by your employer during the actual time you are working for them at their facility.

    I'm another of those nurses that would never consider working a single day without my own coverage. I can't believe, after all these years, that there is still any discussion or controversy about the topic.
    Excellent, elkpark.

    Thank you...
  11. Visit  NurseJennDenn profile page
    1
    I just started my first job as a RN. Thank you for reminding me of the importance of obtaining malpractice insurance. I'm getting a quote today!

    ~Jenn~
    sirI likes this.
  12. Visit  sirI profile page
    1
    So glad you are doing this, NurseJennDenn.

    And, good luck with your first RN position!!
    NurseJennDenn likes this.
  13. Visit  cjcsoon2brn profile page
    2
    I was looking at NSO and I can get a policy that covers me as a CNA and as a nursing student for a pretty reasonable price. I know CNAs are probably never named in lawsuits but I don't want to take any chances because I know that if something bad happens in the end I have to be ready to protect myself because my employer will only be looking out for themselves.

    !Chris
    sirI and CTPCTstudent like this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Visit Our Sponsors
Top
close
close