she tried to access mediport, it was really a pacer - page 4

nurse at work told me this horror story today,( she works per diem at another facility), was working this weekend in acute care, was called off the floor to try to access a mediport, after this other... Read More

  1. Visit  Angie O'Plasty, RN profile page
    0
    Now...we have placed that patient at further risk...bc....now he has to have the pacer replaced....in addition to all the other issues he has going on.





    Come again? Why does he need a pacer replacement? Unless she trashed the wires leading out of the pacer, which would actually be worse than damaging the body of the pacer itself, since the wires actually embed themselves in cardiac tissue. (A procedure which could potentially damage cardiac tissue as well as risk infection.) The pacer itself can be literally unplugged from functioning wires and replaced with a small incision. (Again, risk of infection.)

    I imagined that all this could set him up for quite an infection--which could travel to and affect his heart--but I'm having trouble seeing how a couple of needle pokes could damage a pacer to that extent.
    Last edit by Angie O'Plasty, RN on Jan 25, '06
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  3. Visit  Judee Smudee profile page
    1
    Quote from ICURN_NC
    :uhoh21: Ouch. In our instution, you have to be certified to access those ports.
    On a side note, I was taking care of a pt one day. We had a chest xray done to verify line placement for a line from an outside hosp, and the doc & I are looking @ the film... what do I see? "What the hell is that?!?! A pacemaker??" The doc is like, "Oh, yeah." The day nurse never mentioned this info, the monitor was not set up for a paced pt, and it wasn't even on the flowsheet! EEEKKK!

    Peace,
    Sharon
    The fact that patient has a pacemaker frequently is missed in report. On quite a few occasions it is not mentioned in doctors H&P or anywhere on the chart. I consider it a recurring problem. I remember having a patinet that had implantable defibulater and that did not get mentioned anywhere either. All these things are getting smaller and harder to see.
    Mulan likes this.
  4. Visit  jhlynngirl profile page
    0
    I am an oncology nurse. I work with mediports on a daily basis. You would be surprised how many nurses ruin my patients ports in the hospital. The incompetence is sickening to me. As a nurse, I find it liberating to admit what I do not know, and learn it.
    If a nurse does not know what they are doing, ask. Leave it alone. It is not a difficult concept.
  5. Visit  Chloe'sinNYNow profile page
    0
    Quote from jhlynngirl
    I am an oncology nurse. I work with mediports on a daily basis. You would be surprised how many nurses ruin my patients ports in the hospital. The incompetence is sickening to me. As a nurse, I find it liberating to admit what I do not know, and learn it.
    If a nurse does not know what they are doing, ask. Leave it alone. It is not a difficult concept.
    Maybe not a difficult concept jhl, but not easy to do in all places. I just quit an Onc unit b/c my questions seemed to bother. I was left on my own too often to do too many procedures because it was expected of me. I was being reminded too often that I was lacking in self-confidence b/c I aksed to be watched if I was unsure about a procedure but then they'd tell me out of the other side of their mouth that I was going too slow, or being incompetent, or lacking in this or that.

    It was expected that after viewing on access/deaccess of a port that I should be able to do it afterward. yet I was still unsure of myself and so refused. Because each time (I think I saw 3 actually done) I watched it being done, the nurse doing the poking, failed the first 2 attempts, and I was told to leave the room to get someone who could do it. (I think this reads a little confusing; I never actually did the access or deaccess. I was always an observer)

    And they expected THIS new grad to be able to do it just b/c it's part of being on an Oncology unit?!?!?!??!
    (let me add here that I was on this unit only 3 weeks at this point. and straight out of NS too; turns out, my orientation was only supposed to go 6 weeks and at 8 I had one too many meltdowns on my own. I let them see my tears and frustration. What an embarrassing exit!! )

    Chloe
    Last edit by P_RN on Dec 8, '07


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