Shabbos/Religious Observances - page 18

As I begin the applications process for nursing schools, I have one huuuuge concern - my religious obligations. I am not permitted to work/attend school, etc. from sunset Friday nights until an hour... Read More

  1. by   sharann
    I have enjoyed this thread very much so thank you TM for starting it and thanks to eveyone for keeping it alive for so long without TOS violations ha ha.
    So I am quite Jewish and have been a RN for 7 years. I am not frum but have many, many(did I say MANY) frummie relatives and was raised in a conservative/orthodox household. I know many don't belive you can be both, but I assure you I can/was. I have strong moral and ethical beliefs and ways I live but as for the actual following of rules, I have never been that great. I always felt that translations of the Torah and other writings are an opinion and if I don't agree with one I question it and don't follow it. I use common sense as well. I would NEVER tell anyone that they are imposing on me by not wanting to work on their holy day or Shabbat, but I also feel trapped.
    I feel that as a person we change and grow. IF I really wanted to start observing Shabbat I would not continue working in my present job with my on-call status as it is. Now, perhaps some nice manager and other staff would accomodate me, but maybe not.I might have to look elsewhere for a job and that is not practical for me now. So while I would like to observe Shabbat I cannot, because when hired I was not contemplating ever wanteing to!
    So we all do what we can. I wish you luck in school and am so happy and filled with pride that more Jewish women are going out and looking into this profession which will bring you as much joy as you will bring to someone in need. Ok, so not every shift is joyful but many are filled with great moments. I have a cousin who is also considering nursing and is a very observant young single clollege graduate. I am so amazed at how Jewish women are blossoming When I was a child a "nice Jewish girl "married a nice Jewish male doctor and would never THINK of doing THAT kind of work(dirty and seeing naked men I suppose). Mazel tov to you and welcome to nursing. You will find you have a family in nurses than transcends religion. We nurses are a breed of our own!
    Last edit by sharann on Dec 15, '07
  2. by   lamazeteacher
    For the uninitiated, "frum" means especially observant Orthodox Jews. "Frummies" is the plural.
  3. by   Esther85
    Hi, I am a shabbos observant Jew and have enjoyed this thread very much. I will be graduating from nursing school in May (YAY!!) and while my school has been super accommodating about shabbos and jewish holidays, I am nervous about finding a job that will be. I have just begun applying for jobs, and I was wondering what you would recommend telling potential employers regarding not working on shabbos. I am more than willing to work every sunday and cover holidays but I do realize that I am still asking for a lot. When should I tell employers that I can't work shabbos? When they ask about scheduling at the interview? If they dont ask should I just leave it until after I am hired? Any advice would be appreciated!!!
  4. by   Meriwhen
    Quote from Esther85
    Hi, I am a shabbos observant Jew and have enjoyed this thread very much. I will be graduating from nursing school in May (YAY!!) and while my school has been super accommodating about shabbos and jewish holidays, I am nervous about finding a job that will be. I have just begun applying for jobs, and I was wondering what you would recommend telling potential employers regarding not working on shabbos. I am more than willing to work every sunday and cover holidays but I do realize that I am still asking for a lot. When should I tell employers that I can't work shabbos? When they ask about scheduling at the interview? If they dont ask should I just leave it until after I am hired? Any advice would be appreciated!!!
    Not sure how it'd work in nursing, but based on my last couple of non-medical jobs...you need to be upfront about it because as a new hire, they might stick you on the crappy shifts (i.e., weekends). Don't leave it until afterwards.

    And definitely promote the willingness to work Sundays because I'm sure they have a lot of employees that if given a chance would love Sundays off so they can do their own worship. That's what helped me get one of my jobs--I was willing to do Sundays when few others were.

    They can't not hire you for being Jewish. But be aware that if they're specifically looking for someone to pull a Saturday shift and you tell them you can't do Saturdays (for whatever reason), then they don't have to hire you.
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Feb 10, '08
  5. by   tarapom
    actually, jewish law does not require a woman who has her period to sleep in a seperate room from her husband, they just have to have seperate beds.
  6. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from Josh L.Ac.
    That was a great reply, but I do have to ask the question:

    Why would you need to believe in something so deeply, possibly in contrast to logic and current evidence, to the point where faith is required?
    Because the ancients must have had a reason........I have faith in that, and I'm not Orthodox. Why knock it, if it makes others feel good? :redpinkhe
  7. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from tarapom
    actually, jewish law does not require a woman who has her period to sleep in a seperate room from her husband, they just have to have seperate beds.
    True, but what if their room hasn't room for 2 beds? That must be why Jewish men feel they need to provide more for their families, and achieve higher goals, generally (or not). Have you read thje "Red Tent"? That explains it all..............:spin:
  8. by   shelly304
    I wonder what happened to "texasmommy", the OP? She has never posted since 01/01/2008.
  9. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from shelly304
    I wonder what happened to "texasmommy", the OP? She has never posted since 01/01/2008.
    I looked for the post you referred to and couldn't find it............ In her OP, in Nov. '07, TM said she was in the "application process" for nursing schools. Perhaps her life took another direction........?

    I'd like to recommend Hadassah's Nurses' Council, to Jewish (and interested non Jewish) Nurses. If you would like to get together in your communities and foster hospitals, clinics, and advanced education for Nurses in Israel, this is a worthwhile organization without political leanings (and you don't have to be Jewish to join) - however, men are "associates" in Hadassah, rather than members - which may change with modern input. Let me know if you don't know how to contact the main office in New York, about it.
  10. by   woody62
    I worked at two hospitals, in New York City, one os which was run as a non-observent but Jewish facility and the other as an observant facility. It was at the observant facility that we had the least number of problems. Half the nursing staff was observant and the other half was not. We worked Shabbos and all religious holidays for our observant sisters. In tern, they worked all of our Crhistian religious holidays for us. On Shabbos Eve, we helped our observant patient's prepare for Shabbos. There were times when we had observant patients who did not wish to take medications or undergo treatments, citing them as being considered 'work', forbidden. We generally called the Chief Rabbi to talk with them.

    Today this hospital has a half Mulism population. They have a prayer room with appropriate directions as to Mecca. I learned a great deal about observant Jews. I also learned a great deal about tolerance. It is too bad we don't have more of it in our world.

    Woody
  11. by   shelly304
    Quote from lamazeteacher
    I looked for the post you referred to and couldn't find it............ In her OP, in Nov. '07, TM said she was in the "application process" for nursing schools. Perhaps her life took another direction........?

    I'd like to recommend Hadassah's Nurses' Council, to Jewish (and interested non Jewish) Nurses. If you would like to get together in your communities and foster hospitals, clinics, and advanced education for Nurses in Israel, this is a worthwhile organization without political leanings (and you don't have to be Jewish to join) - however, men are "associates" in Hadassah, rather than members - which may change with modern input. Let me know if you don't know how to contact the main office in New York, about it.
    In "Public Profile" for each member it states the last date and time activity took place for that member.:spin: When a member is on-line you can also see what thread they are viewing. Kind of spooky to be spied on.
  12. by   shelly304
    Quote from shelly304
    I wonder what happened to "texasmommy", the OP? She has never posted since 01/01/2008.

    OOPS!
    Last post was dec.26, 07
    Last on-line was jan.1 2008
  13. by   lpnstudentin2010
    I do not know in regards to staffing since I do not work there, but the hospital that I am a patient at has the elevators running up and down constantly during the sabath, since i guess (NOT JEWISH HERE just trying to understand) pushing the elevator button would be considered work.

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