RN Bridge to MSN?

  1. I have an ADN. I want to get an MSN in nursing education. I have a bachelor's degree in another field, non-nursing. The MSN is a long-term goal. I see myself using it more in my 60's than in my 50's (I'm 53 now.) Would it be better to get a BSN and later get an MSN, or would it be better to enter a bridge program that goes from RN to MSN?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   llg
    I don't think it matters much. Take the path that fits your personal needs the best. Also, consider quality. Choose high-quality education over programs that promise to get you through real fast, but that won't be of high quality because they cut a lot of corners to speed the process.

    There are good ADN to MSN programs and there are bad ones. There are good ADN to BSN to MSN (or DNP) programs out there and there are bad ones. Choose good quality programs that are feasible for you and your resources.
  4. by   JBMmom
    I went the ADN to MSN route. Everyone I spoke with told me there would be no downside to that route. Well, when I applied for a bedside position I was told that because of union rules I couldn't be hired in at the BSN rate, I would be on the ADN pay scale, the MSN didn't count (I think it was because they want magnet status which looks at BSN specifically). Unlikely that you'll find an organization as ridiculous as that one, but just cautioning you that they do exist. I haven't had a problem other than that. I agree you should go with what's going to meet your personal goals, good luck.
  5. by   mmc51264
    Many MSN programs allow you to get the BSN along the way
  6. by   not.done.yet
    I did ADN to MSN and got my BSN along the way. It was worth it to me to utilize the momentum of going straight through and not having to make the decision all over again to return to school. I am super glad I did it the way I did.
  7. by   Everline
    What is it that you really want? I have a very similar situation and I have just made the decision to apply to graduate school (RN-MSN). I have a bachelor's degree in another field and I was facing the decision of whether to go for another undergraduate degree (BSN) or go to graduate school. While contemplating this, I realized that getting my MSN is what I really want and I have nothing to lose by applying. Go for what you really want.
  8. by   EGspirit
    Quote from llg
    I don't think it matters much. Take the path that fits your personal needs the best. Also, consider quality. Choose high-quality education over programs that promise to get you through real fast, but that won't be of high quality because they cut a lot of corners to speed the process.

    There are good ADN to MSN programs and there are bad ones. There are good ADN to BSN to MSN (or DNP) programs out there and there are bad ones. Choose good quality programs that are feasible for you and your resources.
    Thanks. That sounds like good advice.
  9. by   EGspirit
    Quote from JBMmom
    I went the ADN to MSN route. Everyone I spoke with told me there would be no downside to that route. Well, when I applied for a bedside position I was told that because of union rules I couldn't be hired in at the BSN rate, I would be on the ADN pay scale, the MSN didn't count (I think it was because they want magnet status which looks at BSN specifically). Unlikely that you'll find an organization as ridiculous as that one, but just cautioning you that they do exist. I haven't had a problem other than that. I agree you should go with what's going to meet your personal goals, good luck.
    That's totally messed up.

    The one thing I was thinking is that with a decent BSN, I could then later choose MSN programs just for the MSN and not have to be confined to considering only bridge programs. As for costs, so far, my research is that it's about the same either way I go.

    BUT...one thing I was thinking is that with the BSN, I could perhaps teach CNA classes, CPR, maybe ACLS, that sort of thing as extra cash to pay for the MSN.

    Thanks for your response, JB.
  10. by   EGspirit
    Quote from not.done.yet
    I did ADN to MSN and got my BSN along the way. It was worth it to me to utilize the momentum of going straight through and not having to make the decision all over again to return to school. I am super glad I did it the way I did.
    Yes, I could see that being a factor for sure. For me, I'm not sure: I'm kind of an academic type anyway, so I don't think I would lack motivation later on. But I must admit, it would be good to just get it done with.
  11. by   EGspirit
    Quote from Everline
    What is it that you really want? I have a very similar situation and I have just made the decision to apply to graduate school (RN-MSN). I have a bachelor's degree in another field and I was facing the decision of whether to go for another undergraduate degree (BSN) or go to graduate school. While contemplating this, I realized that getting my MSN is what I really want and I have nothing to lose by applying. Go for what you really want.
    I am certainly going to have to think on this some. Thanks for the advice. But in RN-MSN programs, you still have to finish the BSN along the way. I mean, you have to do those requirements no matter what. But I envy your position in getting into a program and just doing it.
  12. by   Everline
    Quote from EGspirit
    I am certainly going to have to think on this some. Thanks for the advice. But in RN-MSN programs, you still have to finish the BSN along the way. I mean, you have to do those requirements no matter what. But I envy your position in getting into a program and just doing it.
    No, I don't plan to get my BSN along the way. Though, depending on your career goals, it might be smart to do so. I don't have a use for it in my situation.

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