Resigning

  1. I have been offered my old job back in an Occupational setting that I love. I have only been at my current job for 1 month. I have decided to take my old job back, but was wondering if it is okay to leave without giving a notice? Has anyone done that? I never have. I have always given appropriate notice however I really HATE the new job and want to get out of there ASAP. The old job also needs someone ASAP. Can the say that you abanded them without giving notice? Thanks for your advise.
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   anniesong
    In my opinion, it is never a good idea to burn a bridge if it isn't absolutely necessary. By leaving without notice, you are leaving your current job in the lurch and that could come back to bite you in the future. This is especially true if you work in a small area where a reputation for "abandoning" (whether that is a true term or not) your job can make it difficult to getanother one in the future if needed.

    Also, when you accepted the new position, did you receive any notice of what the institution considered appropriate notice? Some places say two weeks are enough, others insist on more.

    You said yourself:
    "I have decided to take my old job back, but was wondering if it is okay to leave without giving a notice? Has anyone done that? I never have. I have always given appropriate notice"

    It sounds as if you already think that sticking it out for the appropriate notice is what you consider the "right thing to do", even if you don't like the new job.

    Would you be jeopardizing your opportunity to go back to the job you enjoyed if you had to wait a few weeks before you can go back to them?
  4. by   CritterLover
    oh, i empathize with you. i really do. i know what it is like to want to leave a job so bad.
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    [color=#483d8b]but it really isn't a good idea to leave without giving notice. it is really unprofessional. you will more than likely be considered inelligible for rehire, and you will forfeit any pto/vacation time you may have coming (if any, given that you've only been there a month). if you are made inelligible for rehire, then you won't get a good reference from any future potential employers. (one of the questions often asked during a reference check is "is this person elligible for rehire?") you probably arn't worried about the current job offer, but what if you leave there? you will want your current employer to give a positive (or at least neutral) reference.
    [color=#483d8b]
    [color=#483d8b]is more than 2 weeks required? if you are still in orientation, they may be willing to let you go without 2 weeks notice, since you really arn't a "productive" employee right now. talk with your supervisor. tell her you are leaving because you found this great job, what you have always wanted. let her know that you are willing to work out your notice if she wants, but that you don't need to. since training someone costs alot of money, they quite possibly might be willing to let you go immediatly. but the best way to do it is to talk with your supervisor.
    [color=#483d8b]
    [color=#483d8b]in the end of course, it is your decision. i don't believe the bon considers it to be patient abandonment if you leave a job without giving notice (i think that topic has been discussed on here before). but giving notice really is the professional thing to do.
    [color=#483d8b]
    [color=#483d8b]good luck.
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  5. by   phoenix72
    At my former job, I was a Recruiter. When I was doing a background check, I would ask the former employer if the employee had given notice. If they said "no", it was a red flag. I agree with anniesong, it is never wise to burn a bridge. If you can't offer them three weeks, how about two, or even one? It's better than nothing. Anyway, you'd be surprised how small the world is. You could not only damage your reputation with your current employer but with others as well. People are fluid, always moving. Someone who knows you didn't give notice may move to another facility and then your reputation follows there. Lastly, any honorable employer appreciates the need for a new hire to give notice at their current job, because they would expect it as well. If they are hinting at all about not giving notice, I'd worry. IMHO
    Shaun
  6. by   Yuliya3
    I was in a similar situation few year ago. I started a new job and 2 weeks into orientation realized I do not like anything about it. I called superviser at my old job and she said that she wants me back, asap. I was hesitant to leave without giving an advance notice, but a friend (also an RN ) told me that since I was still on orientation/probation, I probably did not have to give a notice any way. That the probation goes both ways, they are checking me out, I am checking them out. And it is not like I have vacation time to lose. Anyway, I approched ADN the next day, and told her that I do not feel this job is working out for me for a number of reasons, and since I made up my mind about leaving, I do not see why they should waste their time orienting me. I also told her that I want to return to my old job. I said everything nicely, told her how great everyone was to me ( that was true), and she was fine with letting me go.
    I do not think that after being on the job for only 1 month you are obligated to give any lengthy advance notice. While you would definately not want to burn bridges you have to look out for yourself. Good Luck.
    BTW, I also always gave notice otherwise.
  7. by   santhony44
    Quote from phoenix72
    Anyway, you'd be surprised how small the world is. You could not only damage your reputation with your current employer but with others as well. People are fluid, always moving. Someone who knows you didn't give notice may move to another facility and then your reputation follows there. Lastly, any honorable employer appreciates the need for a new hire to give notice at their current job, because they would expect it as well. If they are hinting at all about not giving notice, I'd worry. IMHO
    Shaun
    This is so true! Even if you end up leaving a geographic area, you can still cross paths with someone you know or someone who knows someone...

    If you talk with your current employer and they agree to let you leave right away, that's not the same as not giving notice, at least not to me. Not giving notice is not showing up, or calling to say you aren't coming back, etc. There's a really good chance that they won't particularly wish for you to work out your notice, but if they do, do it with good grace.

    I think, too, if you leave without giving notice it may always bother you a bit that you did that- you aren't entirely comfortable with that option or you wouldn't have posted here.

    Good luck to you!
  8. by   CHATSDALE
    ask you old employer if they can hold your job for a couple of wks while you give notice - then you will know if that option is open for you

    i esp liked the idea of offering to give notice while telling them that you prefer to leave quickly but that you are willing to work for a couple of wk
  9. by   BSNtobe2009
    Since you are probably in your probationary period, you are not obligated to give a notice HOWEVER, you don't want to make their "do not rehire" list by not giving one.

    Explain the situation to them, and say, "I'll give a 2 week notice, but given the fact that I have only been here one month, I would like to go ahead and start back at my old job, but I will work it out if you need me."

    Sometimes they will go ahead and tell you that you can go ahead and leave and there are no hard feelings on either side.
  10. by   doublej
    Always think of a future reference you might need. Now if you have no plans to include this present employment on your resume, for conscience sake, I would still give a notice. You can never go back and redo something you might later regret.
  11. by   NurseCard
    Yeah, double, triple, whatever, on what most everyone has already said. =)
    Call the job that you are wanting and ask them if they can give you a couple of weeks.
    Then talk to your manager of the job you are currently at and explain the situation and find out if you will be burning any bridges if they just let you leave now, or if you need to work at least a couple of more weeks.

    My own little personal anecdote: My former job required all LICENSED staff to give FOUR WEEKS notice in order to be eligible for re-hire.
  12. by   JentheRN05
    I think that you should at least offer notice. I was on probation at my first job. The last day I called in and said, I don't think this is working out for me. I will give you two weeks if you want it. She said, "Jen your on probation, you don't need to give me two weeks. I'm just glad you figured out this wasn't for you while you were on probation". I never worked there another day. Just offer it to them would be my suggestion. It looks good on you.
  13. by   MBARNBSN
    Although legally it may be OK if you do not give notice, I think ethically it is not a good idea. As other posted have suggested, people tend to recall that people walk away from a job. I doubt he/she will recall that you were on probation and you had the right to do so. Maybe resign giving a two week notice, but verbally request to be allowed to leave earlier?

    I have never left a job without giving two weeks even if I was on probation. I always assume that I do not know how my life will turn out and so I am always trying to make sure I do not burn bridges.

    By the way, your new job may need you ASAP but maybe they are willing to accept you working part-time (weekends) or whatever until you can start full-time? Just a thought.
  14. by   P_RN
    This is what I LOVE aobut allnurses. You have all given excellent advice!! Thaks for sharing. And BTW I once left after 20 mins. since they had totally LIED about the job. I'd never worked in a hospital at all and when I showed up for orientation, I found I was to be the 3-11 ANM on peds. with only a week orientation.

    Liar liar pants on fire!!!

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