Was reprimanded and told to resign. Advice or thoughts would be appreciated. - page 6

by nurse20011

13,763 Views | 55 Comments

Hi there, I work on a general medical/surgical floor and had an incident come up the other day. I was given a large patient load without a nurse tech for help. Usually on our unit we have a tech assigned to a nurse if that... Read More


  1. 0
    This is really a sad situation, and I think it was really unfair because you were the only one who was left to tend with a number of patients. Since you resigned, it is best to just move on and not think about being a an awful nurse. You did the best you could and that what matters most.
  2. 0
    Quote from DEE S.
    I would not have resigned. That is for sure. The hospital or floor must have policies regarding ratios and your supervisor should have provided the support. I would have stood my ground. In any case depending on how long you have been a nurse I would apply to other jobs and hospitals. That situation was dangerous and if the hospital does not care enough for its patients and staff accordingly I would not risk my license. As you can see the supervisor made you the scape goat.
    You sometimes have to be careful in these types of situations. If you do not resign, then there may be consequences down the road (ex: impossible workloads, micromanagement, etc.). Resigning, while it may be forced, does sound like the better option for the OP because they left the employer voluntarily rather than involuntarily. As a manager myself, this makes a world of difference when looking at someone's previous work history on a resume.

    Denroc72
  3. 1
    Quote from Denroc72
    You sometimes have to be careful in these types of situations. If you do not resign, then there may be consequences down the road (ex: impossible workloads, micromanagement, etc.). Resigning, while it may be forced, does sound like the better option for the OP because they left the employer voluntarily rather than involuntarily. As a manager myself, this makes a world of difference when looking at someone's previous work history on a resume.Denroc72
    This whole post bothers me for a number of reasons. A nurse who refuses to resign might be given a knowingly "impossible workload" and is "micromanaged" in order to get her to resign? Is this the MO of NMs where you work? Stress the nurse out and put her patients in danger in order to get what you wanted in the first place?That sickens me.
    applewhitern likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from dudette10
    This whole post bothers me for a number of reasons. A nurse who refuses to resign might be given a knowingly "impossible workload" and is "micromanaged" in order to get her to resign? Is this the MO of NMs where you work? Stress the nurse out and put her patients in danger in order to get what you wanted in the first place?That sickens me.
    Dudette10,

    Why does this have to be a practice where I work? Why can I not have an opinion like you and the next person? Why can my post not be from experience whereby this has happened to me or someone close to me? Why can I not be a nurse manager who is giving the OP insight? Why do you pile all nurse managers into one basket? Why can I not be a nurse manager who is sickened by this practice too? Don't assume.

    Denroc72
    Last edit by Denroc72 on Jan 3, '13
  5. 0
    Good. I'm glad you're not one of the managers who does this or condones it.


    Since you edited during my reply...no, I don't pile all NMs in one basket. I have a wonderful one now, and so are some of the NMs on units I float to. Don't assume.
  6. 0
    Quote from annmariern
    And this is why a Nurses union is a godsend; they just wouldn't be able to get away with this. When understaffed we can submit an assisgnment against objection form basically stating that should any issues occur, complaints, falls, missed meds and all of the OP issues, you have great backup when they pull this crap.
    Oh wow this is great! Man I wish we had this.


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