Recommend a friend?

  1. Has anybody ever recommended a friend for a job? Right after we graduated nursing school, my friend applied for a job on my unit (I already had an RN job because I had been a tech there). She did very well and my boss loved her, but she didn't take the job because it was only part time. So my friend went to a different unit, one that she knew that she wouldn't like. Now a position has opened up on my unit, and my boss came to me and told me to tell my friend about it - if she's ready to leave her unit (and I know she is), the job is hers, basically. I don't think they will reinterview or anything like that, but who knows. My friend is just debating now...does she leave a job she doesn't really like but where she is comfortable for a job on a unit she knows nothing about but has a better shift?

    Now, I have no worries about my friend, I know she is great and will be awesome if she decises to work on my unit, but it got me thinking...what if she did something that was "less than desireable"? Would that look bad on me? Let's say she started calling off all the time - do you think my boss would think less of me because I recommended her? Again, no worries here, I hope she does come and work with me! But just wondering...
    •  
  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   Jolie
    Hiring decisions are ultimately the responsibility of the unit manager and HR.

    Your recommending someone did nothing more than open up the opportunity for that person to receive an interview, after which the manager will decide whether or not to make an offer.

    It is unreasonable for a manager to "blame" a staff person for recommending a candidate who doesn't "work out", and no reasonable manager would do so. So, unless you manager is not a reasonable person, I would not worry about recommending a capable friend. If you are still hesitant to do so, perhaps you could encourage your manager to contact your friend directly. That way your friend would have the opportunity to ask questions that might help her decide whether your unit would be a good "fit" for her.
    Last edit by Jolie on Feb 9, '07
  4. by   gr8rnpjt
    I had a friend I met on a tele unit when I worked nights. When I took the jump into managed care, I told her I would try to get her in as well. when the opportunity came up, I called her and got her in at my insurance company. After that we basically continued working together, I would quit for a better job and shortly thereafter I would recommend her and lo and behold, she would be hired as well. Worked well until she developed a drinking problem. My friendship with her was sorely strained when complaints trickled down to me from above. I distanced myself from her outside the office, and I ended up leaving her at that job as I moved on. She messed up bad at the previous employer and they did not fire her, but gave her some time off and she entered the VRP program with the BON of our state. After she was allowed to go back to work, she called me and asked me to get her into my new office so that she could start with a clean slate, so to speak. She was hired on my recommendation and then someone found out about her license restrictions. Mind you, we were working in an office environment where we were not dealing with narcotics restrictions, but a supervisor called me and said, "you recommended her....why?"
    Well, within 2 weeks she had a nasty exchange with one of our regional Medical directoro VP's. She was fired a couple days later.
    All I am saying is make sure she is a "winner" because if she is not, your judgement may be called into question.
  5. by   BBFRN
    I had a similar situation as above. I recommended a friend that had a great personality, work record, etc. Without getting into too much detail, something happened to her, she didn't get help, and her work performance plummeted quickly. I was "unofficially" held to blame for the whole mess. Just be careful.
  6. by   TazziRN
    I might tell a friend about a position but I don't think I would give an unsolicited recommendation for the reasons given above.
  7. by   caliotter3
    You are only expressing understandable reservations about recommending your friend. I agree with everything said by the other posters, especially what Jolie said. It only makes sense. When I have been asked for recommendations, contact info (verbal) and/or written, I have never hesitated to give them. However, the people I have been referring have always been the type of people anyone wants to work with. On the other hand, I was asked about a person once that I was obligated to tell the truth about. I felt no qualms, b/c that person was a clear danger to pts (one of her favorite activities to discredit co-workers was to create med errors and accuse others); no one with a working brain would have given a good reference for that person.

    A coworker once told me about the practice of supervisor/mgrs blacklisting him b/c he was a good employee and their purpose was to keep him from getting a job elsewhere.

    I've had good and bad experiences on the receiving end of referrals for jobs.
    The entire process is flawed. Most officials will say nothing more than the legal requirements. But who answers the phone? Someone in a bona fide HR position? And what did they really say? Negativity can be conveyed in more ways than what is actually stated. And can you get this info from the people who have the hiring resp or are the unit mgrs? Plenty of ramifications, whether giving personal or supervisor referrals. It is very much possible that you could end up testifying in a lawsuit over your friend's/coworker's employment problems. I know, b/c a group of us at one place of employment were in a class action situation. It's not humorous at all. You can also read about such experiences occasionally on this site.

    The safest bet is to back out and say that you do not want to be held responsible for HR functions that may be beyond your control. I can assure you many people take this seemingly selfish route and think nothing of it.

    I just do not believe that the referral/reference part of the hiring process is valid. Anyone can go from good to bad or bad to good. Talking to references usually happens before the interview and in most cases, will prevent an interview from even taking place. Mgrs/supvrs can make their own judgments and decisions well enough without hearing what may be truly artificial opinions. Just my 2 cents based on observed experiences, both good and bad.
  8. by   miko014
    Quote from Jolie
    Hiring decisions are ultimately the responsibility of the unit manager and HR.

    Your recommending someone did nothing more than open up the opportunity for that person to receive an interview, after which the manager will decide whether or not to make an offer.

    It is unreasonable for a manager to "blame" a staff person for recommending a candidate who doesn't "work out", and no reasonable manager would do so. So, unless you manager is not a reasonable person, I would not worry about recommending a capable friend. If you are still hesitant to do so, perhaps you could encourage your manager to contact your friend directly. That way your friend would have the opportunity to ask questions that might help her decide whether your unit would be a good "fit" for her.
    Like I said, I'm not worried about it. She interviewed awhile back with the same manager, who loved her at the time. Actually, my manager came to me and told me that there would be a position opening up and that, if my friend was still interested (which she has told me that she is), to have her call my manager. I have no reservations about it, but I was just wondering if anyone had any interesting experiences with it. Like someone said, anyone can go from good to bad or vice versa. Who knows, maybe she'll develop an addiction to fabric softener and miss work because she's been hanging out at a laundromat. But I don't think my boss would hold it against me. She's fairly reasonable. Thanks for the replies! :spin:

close