Racism in the workplace - page 4

Not to be a downer or anything but I have noticed some harsh things said about patients and sometimes even co workers in my unit when they think no one else can hear them. Has anyone else dealt with... Read More

  1. by   Yayamaya
    What would you do if you felt that you were not being granted an interview because your name was "foreign" or obviously insinuated a particular religion or race?? I am so tempted to call up the HR dept and call them on it. I have applied to 1 hospital for over 2 years as a CNA or Unit Secretary and have never been called by the HR rep. The positions remain open for months. I know that I have the experience, educational background and skills but am CERTAIN that is discrimination. I am extremely frustrated and am increasingly angry.
  2. by   Sheri257
    This is what I don't understand. We have an African American student in our class and, last semester, she would not shut up. It's was so disruptive to the point that you could not hear the lecture.

    Finally, after several warnings, the teachers put her on probation. And then she claimed she was a victim of racism!

    Spike Lee's documentary featured African American citizens who were claiming that the New Orleans levees were intentionally bombed in the black neighborhoods to save the white neighborhoods.

    Intentionally bombed by whom? New Orleans government has been run by African Americans for nearly 30 years now.

    Sometimes it gets to the point that everything is "racist" even when it's not. I don't see how this helps us solve or address the real problems of racism.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Aug 24, '06
  3. by   dragonflyRN
    I am white...and usually the minority on the culturally diverse unit I work on. There are times I am the only white person working on the unit....and my coworkers are sure to point it out. Sometimes they call me the white girl...I usually just laugh it off. Sometimes it bother's me, as I would never label a coworker.

    What bother's me is when coworker's start talking to each other in a language I don't understand. I think in general most people are bothered by this.
  4. by   bcskittlez
    Quote from TheCommuter
    You made me laugh! :chuckle

    But, seriously, anonymity is the true beauty of the world wide web.
    So did I Commuter. And I agree with you about the WWW. I am black female in Tx also and I do worry about the racism and if it could possibly stop others from seeing what God has gifted me with as a nurse (to be of course, not a nurse yet)
  5. by   LeahJet
    Quote from lizz
    Sometimes it gets to the point that everything is "racist" even when it's not. I don't see how this helps us solve or address the real problems of racism.
    You know, I have to agree with you on this.
  6. by   bcskittlez
    Quote from lizz
    This is what I don't understand. We have an African American student in our class and, last semester, she would not shut up. It's was so disruptive to the point that you could not hear the lecture.

    Finally, after several warnings, the teachers put her on probation. And then she claimed she was a victim of racism!

    Spike Lee's documentary featured African American citizens who were claiming that the New Orleasn levees were intentionally bombed in the black neighborhoods to save the white neighborhoods.

    Intentionally bombed by whom? New Orleans government has been run by African Americans for nearly 30 years now.

    Sometimes it gets to the point that everything is "racist" even when it's not. I don't see how this helps us solve or address the real problems of racism.

    :typing
    I am black and I feel you... It REALLY bothers me when we use the race card because it really discredits us when we need to use it. Racism exists, some places.. and so does ignorance and rudeness.. I know rude blacks, whites, and the like.. just chalk it up as a rude "person" who tried to use what they knew best to get out of being called out for being loud.
  7. by   ladside
    My husband works in the federal penitentiary. He was telling me about this white guy at work. When he finished his story asked him how badly was the guy bruised. He said there was no confrontation or physical assault and asked me why I asked. My reply was that he referred to the man as "a white guy at work". Being in a violent place, I assumed the mention of his race was to explain the severe discolorations after an assault. My point was that I knew none of the guys at his job, so what difference does it make whether he was white or black. His reply to me was, "Smart ass." I am multi-racial as many of us are even though the color of the skin may only say one particular color. My grandmother was white, grandfathers...1 black; 1 indian, another grandmother black. I take offense to any type of racism because you never really know your true origins; only as far back as your family tree was DOCUMENTED. The key is to not show your emotions or your anger because if you gave energy to that type of stuff, you probably would be mad EVERY SINGLE DAY!
  8. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from happytobehere
    In 50 years we will all be such ethnic mutts there may not even be a race anymore. Who knows, we might have to concentrate on peoples character instead of skin color!!!!
    There are three major phenotypes (sub-types) of humans: Caucasian, African, Asian.

    As a biologist, I know that one of the essential elements of maintaining phenotypical diversity is 'genetic isolation'. Without relatively absolute genetic isolation, phenotypes tend to breed into a dominant cross-phenotype over time.

    This is what you are talking about. It really is a small world. Give it 10 generations. Phenotypes only exist in a genetic vacuum.

    As it is, when any form asks me my race, I check 'other' and write in: American.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  9. by   ladside
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    There are three major phenotypes (sub-types) of humans: Caucasian, African, Asian.

    As a biologist, I know that one of the essential elements of maintaining phenotypical diversity is 'genetic isolation'. Without relatively absolute genetic isolation, phenotypes tend to breed into a dominant cross-phenotype over time.

    This is what you are talking about. It really is a small world. Give it 10 generations. Phenotypes only exist in a genetic vacuum.

    As it is, when any form asks me my race, I check 'other' and write in: American.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    I need you to help me with A&P. I guess everybody knows by now that I need help with A&P. If you were amy brother, I would call you an egghead. But since you are unrelated, it must be just plain ingenuity.
  10. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from StudentSpouse
    "I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed; ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'" “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. " - Dr. M L King Jr
    What MLK is advocating is integration.

    I'm reading a book about integration right now: 'Someone Else's House' by Tamar Jacoby.

    Her argument is that MLK's vision of integration is truly dead. Nobody, not blacks, not whites, not politicians, nobody truly advocate for integration anymore.

    We've settled for 'segregation by choice', which is little better then 'separate but equal'.

    MLK is a relic of the past. Sadly, we've all moved on and left his dream behind. Name me one civil rights leader today that uses the word, integration, in his definition of the way things 'ought to be'.

    I'm not saying that we aren't making improvements. But, the buzzword today is 'tolerance', not 'integration'.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Aug 24, '06
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Skittlez
    I am black and I feel you... It REALLY bothers me when we use the race card because it really discredits us when we need to use it. Racism exists, some places.. and so does ignorance and rudeness.. I know rude blacks, whites, and the like.. just chalk it up as a rude "person" who tried to use what they knew best to get out of being called out for being loud.
    I and other students, very politely, asked her to keep it down. Her response was: "Excuse me for being black." It had absolutely nothing to do with her being black, and us not being able to listen to and transcribe lecture tapes because of the noise.

    It's like the boy who cried wolf. It does unfairly discredit the real cases of racism because, eventually, people don't listen anymore ... and that's a shame.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Aug 24, '06
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Yayamaya
    What would you do if you felt that you were not being granted an interview because your name was "foreign" or obviously insinuated a particular religion or race??
    A somewhat recent study reveals that job applicants who have these so-called "black-sounding names" or ethnic names are less likely to be called back for interviews, even if their educational levels and resumes are high-quality.

    'Black Names: A Resume Burden?'
  13. by   jobfranklin
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Unfortunately, Bala Shark, your statement is probably true.
    i can hardly agree with racism and all discrimination, i am nursing student , even if i am black , i never faced disrimination in my entirer life
    . no matter whether ur black or white , it will work , when we r behaving well,, culturing a habit of positive attittude towards life, ......

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