Racism in the workplace - page 19

Not to be a downer or anything but I have noticed some harsh things said about patients and sometimes even co workers in my unit when they think no one else can hear them. Has anyone else dealt with... Read More

  1. by   yayalpn
    It is a shame when people make a racist remark. All of us are humans -period.As a nurse all of us were taught to treat everyone the same. My father was from Istanbul, Turkey and my mom was a poor country girl- as children we were not allowed at all to say anything to hurt anyone's feelings because it was just not right. I am sure all of us would be surprised what our patients may say about us but all of us should act properly and respect all.
  2. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    Actually, Rosa was hand-picked to do what she did. And while she was a catalyst, she was part of a well thought out plan and had the support of an organized movement and the NAACP. The point is it takes more than just a willing spirit as much as we would like to believe it is that simple.
    You're correct, it takes more then a willing spirit: it takes an environment that can capitalize on it.

    And that is where talking and consensus and the formation of ideas come into play. That 'organized movement' came from somewhere. And even though the NAACP had been around for years at that point, it was the confluence of ideas that came to a head at the same time that allowed the attack on Jim Crow to actually gain traction.

    And in reality, the key change was that once the very concept of Jim Crow was brought up as EVIL, people began to change their conceptions of it. For too many people, it was just some benign thing, not to trouble themselves about. And while that 'benign' view might have been completely one sided, it will take all sides to effectively move such issues along, then and now.

    Just like the voluntary separation today is some benign thing for too many.

    I disagree with the idea that integration is some fantasy. Are you going to get rid of all vestiges of the concept of 'I'm not like them'? No, the ability to distinguish between my 'people' and those not my 'people' was a very potent protection device in a world where limited resources must be reserved for 'my group'.

    But by the same token, while we are all each defined by 'my team', or 'my political beliefs', etc., we can grow and move those boundaries. I've said it before, it comes down to this: whose society is it?

    You don't have to get rid of every vestige of racism from society to realize that a much larger problem is whole communities that don't believe that society has anything to offer them.

    We attacked use of 'that' word. And rightly so. I'd like to see an attack on the word, 'oreo', or, if you prefer, 'uncle Tom'. Moving ahead in our society is only caving in to 'the man' if you are making headway in someone else's house. Whose house is this?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  3. by   bradleau
    We have several doctors who come in to the hospital in casual or tech type clothing to do their order writing at the desk. You would not believe the number to times,especially to a female black doctor , a family member will come up to have this "tech" doctor get them water or do some other thing because they assume this doctor is a tech. Wearing a lab coat does help identify you as a professional, but still if you are black, you are not considered anything more than a tech. Male blacks are more perceived as doctors even if they are not. Crazy huh? Our female doc's will go and get that person some water, or whatever, or get a nurse. Do the familys learn? NO! By the way, I am not Black. Also I work in the South. As nurses we intervene and politely educate the patient and family. Usually by telling them "that DOCTOR you asked for water, asked me to bring it to you".
    Doesn't work usually, but we try. All of our doctors on staff are great and appreciate what we do. A nice change I believe. ;>)
  4. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA


    You don't have to get rid of every vestige of racism from society to realize that a much larger problem is whole communities that don't believe that society has anything to offer them.

    We attacked use of 'that' word. And rightly so. I'd like to see an attack on the word, 'oreo', or, if you prefer, 'uncle Tom'. Moving ahead in our society is only caving in to 'the man' if you are making headway in someone else's house. Whose house is this?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    You assume that integration or assimilation, which is what you are really talking about, is the only way to move ahead in society. That's quite an arrogant view. Many of us live in two worlds, our own segregated communities and the larger society as a whole. Quite honestly I don't see anything wrong with that.

    And it's nice that you want to see an attack on the word 'oreo'. Who do you know that uses it, because I don't know any. Same for the welfare check bit. Who exactly are you talking about?
  5. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from Nitngale
    I was stationed in Augusta, GA and not only did they refer to me as a Yankee (I'm from CA) but they knew I was from CA. Maybe it was the way I dressed(I live in sweatshirts).

    Oh well that explains it. You certainly acted like a Yankee.













    I'm teasing, I'm teasing. :wink2:
  6. by   madwife2002
    Hey people from the UK always call american people 'the yanks' doesnt seem to matter where they come from!! Now as far as smilies are concerned I have never seen yellow, green, purple nor red people walking around I think they were designed as non racial things. :deadhorse
  7. by   madwife2002
    Oh yeah I think they are Asexual too
  8. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    You assume that integration or assimilation, which is what you are really talking about, is the only way to move ahead in society. That's quite an arrogant view. Many of us live in two worlds, our own segregated communities and the larger society as a whole. Quite honestly I don't see anything wrong with that.

    And it's nice that you want to see an attack on the word 'oreo'. Who do you know that uses it, because I don't know any. Same for the welfare check bit. Who exactly are you talking about?
    Integration or isolation.

    This is a 40 yr old debate. And the concepts are mutually exclusive. Either you claim the society as your own, or not. Each has drawbacks, and each has concequences. Why do you think that is an arrogant view? It was MLK's view. The NAACP you spoke about, the group at the moment in time that aided Rosa Parks: it was THEIR view.

    I don't assume that integration is a better path. I have a valid comparison: 40 yrs of voluntary isolation don't seem so promising. The 'separate society within society' that Stokely Carmichael thought so highly of: where is it? Where is the empowerment for a generation of young men that have resigned themselves to prison or death because there is no hope of anything more promising? "Black Power" is meaningless without 'Black Empowerment'. And turning your back on society is not empowering. Rage without focus is a powerful, but ultimately empty emotion.

    But it's not just about turning your back on society for lack of hope. It's about a society that 'tolerates' such desolation.

    You have a better idea?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  9. by   LADYFLOWER
    Quote from Nitngale
    There are no male ones either! Nor are there older icons! I'm seeing a pattern here. If you went by the icons---most of us are yellow with a smiling face :wink2:
    It would be nice to be that yellow smiley all the time! He looks pretty happy! LOL!
  10. by   LADYFLOWER
    Quote from madwife2002
    Oh yeah I think they are Asexual too
    LOL! I think they are too! Oh goodness...
  11. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    "Black Power" is meaningless without 'Black Empowerment'. And turning your back on society is not empowering. Rage without focus is a powerful, but ultimately empty emotion.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    today was my 16 yo sons 2nd day of school.
    in 1 class, he is the only white person.
    in his other classes, there are a few white kids, couple of spanish, the rest black.
    both days, he has come home telling me the black kids are allowed to use the "n-word" and the (black) teachers don't say anything.
    perhaps it is a form of empowerment, w/o the rage.
    maybe there are folks that don't want to be integrated w/white man, but rather, expect to be treated equally and respectfully.
    kind of a live and let live.
    maybe black folks would be a whole lot happier to exist in a society where the stereotypes are dropped, but continue for us to all live in our own, separate subcultures.
    that ea one of us has the potential and opportunity to be successful, regardless of gender, age, disability or race.
    that yes, a black person can indeed be a physician.
    that there aren't any looks of shock when (any)one is successful, or even more despicable, to assume that any designated race is doomed to minimum wage.
    i don't know anymore.
    i used to have images of racial harmony.
    but for now, maybe, just maybe, it's ok if we don't push too much for mandated integration, w/assurance that everyone is unequivocally worthy; and that we treat ea other accordingly.
    maybe if we stop pushing so much and start the peace process within ourselves, then everything, in time, will fall into place.

    with peace.

    leslie

    eta: it is notable to add that both days, my (white) son has come home extremely happy.
    that everyone gets along and enjoys ea others' company.
    this is a new school for him.
    last few yrs, he's been going to catholic schools.
    this year, a public school, and i've never seen him happier.
    Last edit by leslie :-D on Sep 8, '06
  12. by   NurseguyFL
    Some interesting points are raised here, but as some of you correctly stated, prejudice takes many different forms and it doesn't stop at racism. There are people who love to slight fat people, gay people, ugly people, illegal people, poor people, people of any ethnic or national background thats different than theirs; the comments, the jokes, the facial expressions... Ultimately though, the greatest divide seems to be the one that separates us into fair-skinned and dark-skinned ethnic groups. It is a mistake to assume that people who display these behaviors do so out of ignorance. Unless they have been living under a rock or in a cave during the past 60 years they KNOW better. And I have to laugh whenever I hear people say that claims of racial prejudice are overstated in America. It is an undeniably HUGE part of our history that evolved into the social strata that exist in America today. And it continues to exist in many subtle and some not so subtle ways.

    I do not tolerate this type of behavior in any form, and whenever I see or hear it I always ask: "Was that a negative, derogatory inference about so and so...?" Most people aren't stupid. They know exactly what they are doing, and once they realize that you're not playing into their BS they are usually very careful not to present those attitudes in your presence again, and that's perfectly fine with me. But, we have to be realistic. Some people will never change because they are who they are and they love being and acting that way. I wouldn't call this arrogance, but it certainly is a waste of time and energy.
  13. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    I challenge each of the 7,765 viewers of this thread, and everyone else that comes along:

    WHAT ARE YOU GONNA DO ABOUT IT?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    In the 30 plus minutes since my last post, 179 new readers have read what we all have to say in this thread.

    If only some of them actually listen and understand, that alone makes it worth the effort to talk about it.

    To each of those new readers - and the older readers: how are YOU convicted to be the one person that challenges all previous assumptions within your environment?

    Where is the spirit of Rosa Parks within you?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    FYI just because someone's not talking constantly about it, or constantly reading about is certainly does not mean people aren't doing something abouot it, trust me.

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