Post-Mortem Care | allnurses

Post-Mortem Care

  1. 0 Quick question. Do you send the shrouded deceased in a hospital gown?

    I have always put a clean hospital gown on the body before wrapping the deceased in that heavy plastic shroud. Never occurred to me not to. At my new job, I was helping a co-worker with post-mortem care and she stripped off the gown and started to wrap the naked, still warm body in the plastic shroud. I was aghast. She said "it's policy -- you send them naked."

    Now, I know it's just a body and that the spirit has left, etc. etc. etc. But I just thought it was appalling! Those plastic shrouds are awful enough but I understand the need for them. I just kept thinking, what if this was my mother's body? It seems so disrepectful.

    What do you do?
  2. Visit  Zee_RN profile page

    About Zee_RN

    Zee_RN has '17' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Hospice, Critical Care'. From 'Just this side of yesterday'; 56 Years Old; Joined Oct '00; Posts: 1,657; Likes: 164.

    33 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  BayMae10 profile page
    0
    I have always sent the body in the hospital gown. i think, what would i want done for my family members, throw that hospital policy crap out the window, these where and are real people that deserve respect!!!!
  4. Visit  tmiller027 profile page
    0
    Originally posted by Zee_RN
    Quick question. Do you send the shrouded deceased in a hospital gown?

    I have always put a clean hospital gown on the body before wrapping the deceased in that heavy plastic shroud. Never occurred to me not to. At my new job, I was helping a co-worker with post-mortem care and she stripped off the gown and started to wrap the naked, still warm body in the plastic shroud. I was aghast. She said "it's policy -- you send them naked."

    Now, I know it's just a body and that the spirit has left, etc. etc. etc. But I just thought it was appalling! Those plastic shrouds are awful enough but I understand the need for them. I just kept thinking, what if this was my mother's body? It seems so disrepectful.

    What do you do?
    I used to work in a funeral home part time so I have a little background on this.

    As long as the body is covered at all, like in the plastic shroud, that's all that's really necessary. I don't look at it as any less respectful for them not to have a gown on. When they get to the funeral home, they have to be stripped naked to be cleaned off and embalmed. Or if an autopsy is needed, they will be nude as well. The biggest thing is making sure that the public doesn't see the naked body, that would be more disrespectful.

    As long as they're wrapped in the bag or shroud while out in the public view, covering both their body and face, that's the best way to let them maintain their dignity. Once again, that's my experience.
  5. Visit  Havin' A Party! profile page
    0
    Yes, patient is gowned when transported to our hospital's morgue.
  6. Visit  Nurse Ratched profile page
    0
    My last facility, the patient was wrapped in a flat sheet then placed in the body bag. I'd actually have to look up the policy at my current facility as I've not actually had anyone pass on my shift (the difference between oncology and psych, I guess...)

    The gown seems more respectful.
  7. Visit  undertaker profile page
    0
    As a licensed embalmer we usually receive the remains in a shroud, whether from a nursing facilty or a hospital. It really depends on the facility, sometimes the body will arrive in a pouch with no clothing, but I believe as an funeral director they should be covered, it is someones' loved one.
  8. Visit  ADNRN profile page
    0
    The dead body no longer requires respect, except out of respect for the family, who are living. Only the living require respect.

    I've seen nurses all in tears over a dead body that they wouldn't spend ten minutes with while the person was in this world.

    This sounds cold, but it's really not, if you think about it. Zip the bag, and comfort the family. We have to make a distinction between the living and the dead, or we will never be able to love properly.

    That's my opinion, anyway.
  9. Visit  Speculating profile page
    0
    Originally posted by ADNRN
    The dead body no longer requires respect, except out of respect for the family, who are living. Only the living require respect.

    I've seen nurses all in tears over a dead body that they wouldn't spend ten minutes with while the person was in this world.

    This sounds cold, but it's really not, if you think about it. Zip the bag, and comfort the family. We have to make a distinction between the living and the dead, or we will never be able to love properly.

    That's my opinion, anyway.
    You just keep digging yourself in deeper and deeper don't yah!


    There's no reason for the deceased not to have something on. There's really no reason to debate this. It's about a $2.00 gown the hospital doesn't want to lose their money on - how silly.
  10. Visit  BarbPick profile page
    0
    Must be a Miami thing, but we never send a patient to the morgue in any bed clothes. We use a morgue kit that is a big giant plastic sheet a toe tag, small ties for the inside for the hands, one to secure the head and mouth and ties for around the remains. No gown.
  11. Visit  Speculating profile page
    0
    Originally posted by BarbPick
    Must be a Miami thing, but we never send a patient to the morgue in any bed clothes. We use a morgue kit that is a big giant plastic sheet a toe tag, small ties for the inside for the hands, one to secure the head and mouth and ties for around the remains. No gown.
    That's a sad thing those things don't help any more. Tying their mouths shut and hands together - please. I'm not disrespecting you BarbPick I understand that is your policy. That's the cheapest set up they have. I don't believe it meets the codes anymore since it really doesn't even keep fluids contained.
  12. Visit  BarbPick profile page
    0
    Originally posted by Speculating
    That's a sad thing those things don't help any more. Tying their mouths shut and hands together - please. I'm not disrespecting you BarbPick I understand that is your policy. That's the cheapest set up they have. I don't believe it meets the codes anymore since it really doesn't even keep fluids contained.
    You would be surprised the ways I receive some of my patients. That cheap morgue kit is a blessing. Really, it is the only way I have seen post mortem care.
  13. Visit  Scififan profile page
    0
    I always send them in a gown, and don't particularly care what the policy is. For me its respect for the person you were caring for, and that care lasts until they leave the ward breathing or not!
  14. Visit  Speculating profile page
    0
    Originally posted by BarbPick
    You would be surprised the ways I receive some of my patients. That cheap morgue kit is a blessing. Really, it is the only way I have seen post mortem care.
    We moved to the white travel bags that a person uses to keep their clothing in that need to stay on hangers. They are pretty nice made out of a heavy white plastic. You just slip the body in an zip it up.


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