Please help, unsure where to go from here

  1. Please help,
    I am at a cross road. I want to do something different other than work night shifts, weekends and holidays. I feel my BSN degree was a waste of time in reference to actually using it for something. I wanted to pursue a profession in CRNA but you have to take so many more classes beyond what was required in nursing school. I don't want to continue working the floor only to get to many patients per nurse and low pay. Nurse pract. are oversaturated in the area I am living. What do I do with this degree now. I am just frustrated and upset because I feel that I wasted my time. I look nursing but I want to do more with my degree and maybe just make a little more so I can get out of this debt. Please any suggestions would help.
    Noel
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   rbez
    You need a hug! Don't give up on your dream to become a CRNA. You can slog through those classes just like the rest of us. Look at the people who have done it -- they aren't any better or smarter than you are. Belive me, those three years will pass anyway. In 2005, do you want to be regreting what you didn't do, or feel good about what you did? I'm speaking from experience here.

    As for the $ issue - buck up little camper. There's an increasing amount of money available for nurses who want advanced degrees. The feds just passed a 'loan forgiveness' bill (now on GWB's desk) that will let you write off the loan if you teach in a school of nursing afterward... I'm sure that there will be even more opportunities coming along since the shortage of faculty is even more severe than the shortage of staff nurses. Be sure to talk to the financial aid folks -- there are some private funding sources that even provide stipends when you're in school.

    Now, for your current 'burnout'. Are there any other jobs available with more 'controllable' hours? What about transferring to a less stressful area? Changing to a compressed week schedule with more days off? Will your employer flex your hours to accomodate your class requirements? Mine always did. If not, find someone who will. After you complete your first 6 hours of MSN work(NLN requirement), you could get a job as a clinical instructor.

    Remember -- you are not your job. There are plenty of other jobs out there for someone with your skills and knowledge. Don't hesitate to contact me if I can help with moral support, advice, nagging, etc.
  4. by   guesswho
    Keep the faith, kiddo!! There are so many things you can do with this wonderful education you have acquired. Have you thought of teaching CNA classes? Or doing clinical teaching?? I don't know about the money, but the experience would be great!

    Whatever you do, remember you are the best YOU there is!
    XXXXX
  5. by   Love-A-Nurse
    originally posted by noel
    please help,
    i am at a cross road. i want to do something different other than work night shifts, weekends and holidays. i feel my bsn degree was a waste of time in reference to actually using it for something. i wanted to pursue a profession in crna but you have to take so many more classes beyond what was required in nursing school. i don't want to continue working the floor only to get to many patients per nurse and low pay. nurse pract. are oversaturated in the area i am living. what do i do with this degree now. i am just frustrated and upset because i feel that i wasted my time. i look nursing but i want to do more with my degree and maybe just make a little more so i can get out of this debt. please any suggestions would help.
    noel
    do you have to have so many hours/years in a certain area to go on to become a crna, if so what area is this and if you aren't working this area, maybe if you move to it, you can see some satisfaction because you know what your goal is. you can also work flexi-pool, agency, school nurse, and so much more with a bsn and not work night, or weekends, or holiday but with agency working holidays brings in more money. all the best to you! keep the faith!
  6. by   CseMgr1
    Try Case Management. You can put your experience and knowledge to work doing care coordination as I have done (got fed up with the mindless shiftwork, too). Check it out on CMSA's website: http://www.cmsa.org/
    Good luck! =)
  7. by   LasVegasRN
    Yay! Another fellow case manager!
  8. by   spineCNOR
    Dear Noel,

    Have you considered clinical research - university hosptals and some private companies hire nurses to assist with carrying out clinical trials. From what I understand the usual educational requirement is a BSN. Very interesting work with no nights, holidays, etc.

    How long has it been since you finished your BSN--are some of your former professors still around? If so, they could be an excellent resource. Many nursing professors have a variety of connections that you might not even be aware of, and they could help point you to a new area of nursing, or refer you to someone that could help you. Your school might also have some sort of career development center with counselors that can help you fine-tune your resume and give you pointers to help you get ready for a job search.

    I understand that you are discouraged, but don't give up.
    Good luck!
  9. by   rebelwaclause
    Yes...Case Management is the move. I worked for an IPA for a year and it is truly a field of nursing that you are challenged, can have a lazy day (if you need to) and are constantly educated to perfection. Within Case Management, you can specialize in disease management, in which you maintain a database of patients with a disease (I did CHF), offering intake, education, referrals and advocacy.
  10. by   EricaCCRN
    Have you thought about working agency? How much ICU experience do you have (you'll need it for CRNA)? If ou have enough, take an agency position so you can set your own hours while you go back to school. Don't give up on that. You'll never be happy until you do what you dream of doing. You may have a few years of eating shyt to get there, but it WILL be worth it in the end.
  11. by   jurbyjunk
    Well, I served 4 years in the USAF as a burns specialist in Vietnam. I loved being a military nurse and, 32 years later, am still sorry that I returned to civilian life. Suggest you explore opportunities available either with active duty or as a reservist. May not be your cup of tea of course.
  12. by   mattsmom81
    Consider ICU and/or OR...you will then get a good idea of the CRNA's role and see if you like it. You have SO MANY options open to you...do some exploring...and if you need to take control of your life. PRN status or agency is a great way to go, too, as the others have said! Good luck to you!!

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