Part-time position clarification

  1. 0
    Hi all,
    I have heard of 'part time' RN positions in hospitals where you work the full time shift load for a certain amount of time in a pay period, then then part time shift load for the remainder of the period. I would just like some clarification as to what this entails in terms of what to expect in scheduling.

    Are benefits determined on the fact that the nurse is a 'part time' employee, even though they are working the full time shift load for a pay period? And how is pay determined?

    I realize this is a very HR-heavy question, but I didn't know where else to post this... any insight would be appreciated. Much thanks in advance!

    -liz0105
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    Where I work part time positions consist of a certain number of shifts in a pay period. You may work more days in the first week and much less in the second week but it is the over all number of days worked in the pay period that is considered.
    liz0105 likes this.
  4. 2
    Quote from loriangel14
    Where I work part time positions consist of a certain number of shifts in a pay period. You may work more days in the first week and much less in the second week but it is the over all number of days worked in the pay period that is considered.

    I had difficulty understanding the type of position the OP was asking about but I think this post clarified it for me. Just to be technically correct for the OP, it's actually based on the overall number of HOURS in the pay period, not days. I think this is what you meant to say and I don't mean to be picky, but I wanted to make sure the OP understood.

    As for scheduling, that is entirely dependent upon the facility and the person doing the schedule. At my hospital, someone with this type of position may work some 12's and some 8's in the same pay period to get the correct number of hours.

    Regardless of the number of hours worked in particular week, if you were hired to a PT position, your benefits will be based on those for a PT employee.

    You will be paid for the number of hours worked regardless of FT or PT status. OT will be paid if you work more than 40 hours in one week at the minimum. OT may also be paid based on other laws particular to your state.
    Mrs. SnowStormRN and liz0105 like this.
  5. 1
    loriangel & GM2RN - Thank you for your explanations! Makes much more sense, now.
    GM2RN likes this.
  6. 1
    Yes you are right, I should have said hours not days in the pay period.
    GM2RN likes this.
  7. 0
    You have to ask another PT nurse. Sometimes its really nutty. This I hear from nurses who do PT but wanted FT. They cannot ever get a solid idea of schedule. They sometimes work almost doubles one week then nothing or call offs the next. Complaints are it's impossible to wrangle two PT jobs to make ends meet for some of the hospitals where I am. Sadly they are kept from classes that are paid for full time employees and do not get benes as FT people do even if they end up working every time they are called in even when it's not preplanned. This can be totally different depending on your facility. I'd be sure to ask around.
  8. 0
    Quote from onaclearday
    You have to ask another PT nurse. Sometimes its really nutty. This I hear from nurses who do PT but wanted FT. They cannot ever get a solid idea of schedule. They sometimes work almost doubles one week then nothing or call offs the next. Complaints are it's impossible to wrangle two PT jobs to make ends meet for some of the hospitals where I am. Sadly they are kept from classes that are paid for full time employees and do not get benes as FT people do even if they end up working every time they are called in even when it's not preplanned. This can be totally different depending on your facility. I'd be sure to ask around.

    Oh yeah, you make some good points. I didn't even think about call-offs (called staff adjusting at my facility) cuz it never happens to me in my particular position, but that can be an issue. I also didn't realize that classes may not be paid for for PT employees (they are at my facility), so yeah, definitely ask about all of the particulars.

    Oh, and let me just add one thing that does bug me about my facility that is that you have to pay union dues regardless of the number of hours worked, or even if you worked NONE in a pay period. This happened to me a couple of times when I was PRN there and it sucked! I ended up having to write a check to the union for those times when I didn't get a paycheck!
    Last edit by GM2RN on Aug 8, '11
  9. 2
    Yeah your right it can be a hard deal. A friend of mine said it almost wasn't worth it. She simply could not make enough as a nurse since she could not fill her other hours to pay the bills due to the scheduling issues and the main part time job demanding preference on a whim. She had thought, maybe she could go back to school but was told she couldn't apply for any assistance from the hospital since she was PT, and they would not firm up her schedule. She was so sad. Sometimes the only thing open is part time, and that soon becomes a problem when it gets to be what's popular for hospitals to do to save money. She actually thought of getting out of nursing and resuming her old tech job full time, and then going back to school.
    GM2RN and liz0105 like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from onaclearday
    Yeah your right it can be a hard deal. A friend of mine said it almost wasn't worth it. She simply could not make enough as a nurse since she could not fill her other hours to pay the bills due to the scheduling issues and the main part time job demanding preference on a whim. She had thought, maybe she could go back to school but was told she couldn't apply for any assistance from the hospital since she was PT, and they would not firm up her schedule. She was so sad. Sometimes the only thing open is part time, and that soon becomes a problem when it gets to be what's popular for hospitals to do to save money. She actually thought of getting out of nursing and resuming her old tech job full time, and then going back to school.
    Thank you for your insight! I am actually interviewing for a part time position - I am a new grad, and this role is in my unit of choice. However, I need to weigh the financial reality vs. my long term career goals. I greatly appreciate everyone's candor... Looks like I'll be asking HR and the hiring manager a few more questions...
  11. 2
    Quote from liz0105
    Thank you for your insight! I am actually interviewing for a part time position - I am a new grad, and this role is in my unit of choice. However, I need to weigh the financial reality vs. my long term career goals. I greatly appreciate everyone's candor... Looks like I'll be asking HR and the hiring manager a few more questions...

    Liz, I don't know your circumstances so only you can decide, but I would like to caution you against automatically turning down a PT position just because it may not cover all of your bills on its own.

    In today's economy, you may find it difficult to find a FT position right away. One option is to accept the PT job, and then take a second job that is PRN, NOT PT. Another PT position will have scheduling issues like onaclearday pointed out, but as PRN you can work when it fits into your PT schedule. I worked 2 jobs this way for 18 months until a FT job became available.

    Also consider that someone seeking a job almost always looks more attractive to a potential employer when they are already actively employed, so it could work to your advantage to have a PT job even if you continue to look for other employment. And if you have any inclination that it might take awhile to find a FT job, having some money coming in from a PT job is better than nothing at all, even if it doesn't cover all of your bills.

    Just some things to think about.
    MrChicagoRN and Kooky Korky like this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top