Out of nursing program cause i am smoker!!! - page 7

Help, I am at risk of being out of the nursing program because I am a smoker. I really could use some advise on how to deal with a very unfair instructor. I am a first year PN student and we... Read More

  1. by   MomNRN
    I have scanned all posts and wonder why there are so many suggestions on how to keep on smoking and "hide" it.

    A rule is a rule is a rule. You chose to go to nursing school just as you chose to take her class. I think attending school is a privilege not a right. She teaches the class, she makes the rules - it is that simple.

    If you don't like the rules, you can always quit.
  2. by   jimthorp
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    It was a part of our "dress code" rule that our clothes not smell like smoke. Our instructors made it clear that it wouldn't be tolerated.

    (I know, i know, the OP did not say if that's written policy for their school...)

    My school also has a smoking policy but it is not more restrictive for nursing students than for the rest of the student body and rightly so.
    Last edit by jimthorp on Jan 8, '07
  3. by   Freedom42
    "We were informed that if we as much as smelled of smoke during clinicals we would be docked in our grade.

    One day another student and I got busted for smoking... Our grade for the day was docked in every area it could. I would be fine with that. What I dont feel is fair is the way the instructor handled it after that."

    Agreed: A rule is a rule. So why didn't the instructor follow her own rule instead of making up new ones after the fact? This student doesn't have a problem with being penalized. She's angry because the instructor has invented new penalties instead of the ones laid out at the beginning of the class.

    By the way, I'm wondering if the OP depends on financial aid; if so, the incomplete grade the instructor insists upon could make matters much worse if her aid is withheld as a result.
  4. by   dmarie (GA)
    I'm a PN student and a smoker. I would never dream of going outside to smoke during clinicals. That's just crazy. It's unprofessional. Wear a patch, write the papers, and suck it up. You shouldn't have been smoking and you know it. Why are you now angry that you're in trouble? Why should you receive special treatment or be excused from the rules? Do you really believe that making waves in the program will further you along? Get real and grow up.
  5. by   jimthorp
    Quote from MomNRN
    I have scanned all posts and wonder why there are so many suggestions on how to keep on smoking and "hide" it.

    A rule is a rule is a rule. You chose to go to nursing school just as you chose to take her class. I think attending school is a privilege not a right. She teaches the class, she makes the rules - it is that simple.

    If you don't like the rules, you can always quit.
    This is a rather dictatorial view.

    Even if there is a rule against smoking during clinicals, that rule does not apply to traveling to or from the clinical site, as another poster suggested is "the rule." Such a rule is beyond the boundaries of the school's authority.
    Last edit by jimthorp on Jan 8, '07 : Reason: correction
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from jimthorp
    My school also has a smoking policy but it is not more restrictive for nursing students than for the rest of the student body and rightly so.
    Our clinical dress code was exclusive to the nursing program.
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Our clinical dress code was exclusive to the nursing program.
    Ours too - as I mentioned, for classes on campus smokers made a bee-line outside to smoke during breaks and lunch.

    We were not to smell of smoke during clinicals. No smoking at all. Period. We knew it ahead of time.

    I still think the teacher is being unreasonable and a bit of a tyrant - calling mom is unprofessional.

    The rules need to be cleared up. The teacher needs to be more respectful.

    The students need to not smoke and not smell of smoke during clinicals.

    steph
  8. by   jimthorp
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Our clinical dress code was exclusive to the nursing program.
    Come on Marie, don't compare apples to oranges. Attire is not the same as behavior.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from jimthorp
    Come on Marie, don't compare apples to oranges. Attire is not the same as behavior.
    I simply stated that my school had a rule where smoke was concerned under our dress code. I wasn't comparing apples to oranges, so please don't take my words and run with them.
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from jimthorp
    Come on Marie, don't compare apples to oranges. Attire is not the same as behavior.
    I think she meant that her clothes were not to smell of smoke . . .


    steph

    oops - Marie already clarified that.
  11. by   CHATSDALE
    instructor was wrong but if you get left behind in the program is being right going to help any??
    when you go to work you can choose where you want to work and you will have more rights
    i had a tyrant for an instructor and i don't know how i survived it but i did and i worked and made a living and provided good care for patients...
    after you graduate you can make an offical complaint to those with authority OVER HER
    but right now be invisable for the time remaining..see if you can get classes with an other tteacher
    keep space between yourself and other smokers, don't want to be accused when you are innocent
    good luck
  12. by   MomNRN
    Quote from jimthorp
    This is a rather dictatorial view.

    Even if there is a rule against smoking during clinicals, that rule does not apply to traveling to or from the clinical site, as another poster suggested is "the rule." Such a rule is beyond the boundaries of the school's authority.
    It may be beyond the boundaries of the school's authority, but it is fair to say that the OP was warned ahead of time that smoking was not allowed. How is that not clear?

    In my opinion, it was a clear cut rule. No smoking period. No smelling of smoke.

    What is there to debate if this is an infraction?
  13. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from jimthorp
    My school also has a smoking policy but it is not more restrictive for nursing students than for the rest of the student body and rightly so.
    So I suppose that you didn't have to wear uniforms to clinical, and could go wearing shorts.

    I guess that y'all were not drug/alcohol tested and could not be prosecuted if you came to clinicals and giving care, impaired from going on a bender the night before.

    And no one gets kicked out over a domestic violence or DUI conviction.

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    Nursing School is not like "regular" classes and most nursing students get critiqued on issues that "regular" students are not judged on. It may not be fair, but then life and nursing is often not fair.

    In school, my fellow classmates and I got marked off for getting spots of betadine on our uniform and scuffs on the heels of our shoes...and yes, the instructor checked. People wore their slippers while driving to clinical, and put on their shoes when they got to site, so not to scuff shoes.

    If you ever go to work reeking of garlic, onions, perfume or day old alcohol - which sweats out and does carry an odor..well after the detrimental effects are gone, You will find out fast that what you do outside the workplace DOES affect those that you work with. And it will show up in ways on your employee eval. Work to a certain extent can be affected by what you do on your own time - DWIs can get your license pulled.

    Responsible nurses do not reek of ANYTHING - smoke, perfume, food, etc. - this is called "common sense" and need not be addressed by a "smoking specific" rule. Most schools address appropriate hygiene/grooming as part of dress codes. It does not matter what attached to you carries the odor - jacket, pants, whatever.

    That said, your instructor seems very over the top and childish in threatening to notify parents. Adults do not need Mommy called on them. She needs to get a grip.

    I would also suggest notifying her superior about her excess behavior.

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