Out of nursing program cause i am smoker!!! - page 2

Help, I am at risk of being out of the nursing program because I am a smoker. I really could use some advise on how to deal with a very unfair instructor. I am a first year PN student and we... Read More

  1. by   Freedom42
    I'd like to know what your school's harassment policy says. I find your instructor's threat to tell your mother bizarre at best. She apparently thinks bullying is acceptable behavior.

    One other item in this thread made me do a double-take: It was a reference to "smoking booths" at a hospital (in Kentucky, I believe). I'd never heard of that. Most hospitals here haven't allowed smoking on hospital grounds for years.

    I don't want to be around anyone who smells of cigarette smoke. But it's not illegal to smoke, no matter what this self-appointed ayatollah has to say.
  2. by   buddiage
    Gee, alot of ideas:

    Say you are around parents that smoke, but you don't.

    or

    write the paper on the nasty habit of smoking and do a comparison to eating candy, and how much it costs America to take care of people that inflict thier own health problems on themselves.

    Her accusations, as you described them, are way out of line. She is not a dictator. She has people she answers to.

    Other than that, the only thing you can do is limit your smoking so your fellow students and patients do not smell it.

    I hate the smell of smoke and what it does to me. If you are considerate, then I think you should be able to smoke all you want.

    You sound considerate and respectful.
  3. by   scrubsnhugsRN
    after having recently finished nursing school (a year and a half) my advice to you is to suck it up and do the papers. nursing school is not like regular college it is more like boot camp.
    think of it this way, let's say you are doing everything right, as i am sure you are, if you have problems with your clinical instructor you are doomed. if you decided to not write the papers, and the university is sympathetic to you, you will still be doomed, because bottom line your instructor can fail you as she deems fit.
    do you not think she will remember that you went above her, around her?
    even if you are right...even if it is unfair, you have to follow through with what your instructor expects you to do. she has the power not you.
    i cannot tell you how many people in my class did not get along with my instructor, or how many she did not personally like for whatever reason, she made their lives in clinical a nightmare.
    nursing school is tough, clinicals are stressful, and at times you are at the whim of your instructors personal beliefs, and personality.
    so yes my advice is bite the bullet, do the papers, remember why you went into nursing school and "git er done".

    hang in there, i am sure as you go along your will hear stories of clinical nightmares from other student and nurses, you are not alone!!
  4. by   mamason
    OK...I'm a smoker, and when I was in school there was no such policy on smoking of any kind. Now..to get to the bottom of things,


    1: Wear a patch to clinicals. It helps with the cravings.
    2: Write your paper, Don't create unwanted attention to yourself. Just give in and chalk it up as a lesson learned.
    3: If you plan on smoking on the way home, wait until you are out of site of this instructor to light up.
    4: Gain detergant usually gets the smoke smell out of clothes. Works pretty good.


    I guess my point is....don't create waves for yourself. Nursing school is hard enough. Just go along with what the instructor wants. You're only in school for a short time anyway. And clinicals are ususally only 2 days a week. This obviously is a personal issue with your instructor. Plus, some people are Highly allergic to smoke and also the lingering smoke smells on clothing and hands etc. This may be why she is so....against it on clinical days. Good Luck in school.
  5. by   HuggyPuglet
    Just a few comments:

    1. The threat to tell your mother is ridiculous and I can't see where your instructor might feel this is in any way helpful (unless you are under 18).

    2. The required report on lying may not be too far-fetched. By breaking the known rules and sneaking your smoke you were lying if not verbally, you were performing a dishonest act. Your grades may be wonderful, but if you are so willing to do this sort of thing, how can you be trusted considering you will be entrusted with patient confidentiality issues, etc.?

    3. Until you witness a patient going into respiratory arrest from a foreign odor don't be so quick to dismiss your infraction as being minor. I have seen this twice in my career and I never would want to see it again...EVER.
  6. by   meownsmile
    Yes the rules are the rules and sometimes you have to follow them like it or not. But now,, would someone please tell people that work in healthcare and nursing students that purfumes are no more allowed or appropriate than reaking of cigarette smoke. Actually people can have far worse reactions to purfumes than cigarette smoke smell.
    I have to agree,, expect them to follow the rules as they are written for your program. They have them for a reason (so people cant impose their own rules on others). All of that should have been reviewed at your orientation to the program, not decided upon at one persons disgretion.
  7. by   Lisa CCU RN
    The smell of cigarette smoke is highly offensive to patients and they shouldn't have to put up with it anymore than they should have to put up with bad B.O.

    This sounds like a good time to quit or to wear a patch.
  8. by   jimthorp
    Quote from scrubsnhugsrn
    after having recently finished nursing school (a year and a half) my advice to you is to suck it up and do the papers. nursing school is not like regular college it is more like boot camp.
    think of it this way, let's say you are doing everything right, as i am sure you are, if you have problems with your clinical instructor you are doomed. if you decided to not write the papers, and the university is sympathetic to you, you will still be doomed, because bottom line your instructor can fail you as she deems fit.
    do you not think she will remember that you went above her, around her?
    even if you are right...even if it is unfair, you have to follow through with what your instructor expects you to do. she has the power not you.
    i cannot tell you how many people in my class did not get along with my instructor, or how many she did not personally like for whatever reason, she made their lives in clinical a nightmare.
    nursing school is tough, clinicals are stressful, and at times you are at the whim of your instructors personal beliefs, and personality.
    so yes my advice is bite the bullet, do the papers, remember why you went into nursing school and "git er done".

    hang in there, i am sure as you go along your will hear stories of clinical nightmares from other student and nurses, you are not alone!!

    if you don't value your rights, then follow this advice.
  9. by   niceguyOH
    Hey,
    I am a smoker also. During clinicals, I didn't smoke. You have to just follow their rules until you are on your own time! I went through a lot of gum. I also smoked a lot before clinical. I would just use body spray to cover it up. Febreeze and/or Bath & Body Works does help. Trust me. As far as her telling your mother, who does she think she is. This isn't high school! LOL!
  10. by   HuggyPuglet
    Quote from meownsmile
    Yes the rules are the rules and sometimes you have to follow them like it or not. But now,, would someone please tell people that work in healthcare and nursing students that purfumes are no more allowed or appropriate than reaking of cigarette smoke. Actually people can have far worse reactions to purfumes than cigarette smoke smell.
    I have to agree,, expect them to follow the rules as they are written for your program. They have them for a reason (so people cant impose their own rules on others). All of that should have been reviewed at your orientation to the program, not decided upon at one persons disgretion.
    Agreed! One of the two respiratory arrests I've witnessed had to do with a reactionary response to perfume worn by a visitor upon entering a patient room.
  11. by   jimthorp
    Quote from HuggyPuglet
    2. The required report on lying may not be too far-fetched. By breaking the known rules and sneaking your smoke you were lying if not verbally, you were performing a dishonest act. Your grades may be wonderful, but if you are so willing to do this sort of thing, how can you be trusted considering you will be entrusted with patient confidentiality issues, etc.?
    You are making the assumption there was a violation of established, written rules.
  12. by   niceguyOH
    Sounds like she must be either allergic or used to smoke herself. Often it seems that the people who used to smoke and have quit, are the communists!
    I got through it. You can do it!
  13. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from scrubsnhugsrn
    after having recently finished nursing school (a year and a half) my advice to you is to suck it up and do the papers. nursing school is not like regular college it is more like boot camp.
    think of it this way, let's say you are doing everything right, as i am sure you are, if you have problems with your clinical instructor you are doomed. if you decided to not write the papers, and the university is sympathetic to you, you will still be doomed, because bottom line your instructor can fail you as she deems fit.
    do you not think she will remember that you went above her, around her?
    even if you are right...even if it is unfair, you have to follow through with what your instructor expects you to do. she has the power not you.
    i cannot tell you how many people in my class did not get along with my instructor, or how many she did not personally like for whatever reason, she made their lives in clinical a nightmare.
    nursing school is tough, clinicals are stressful, and at times you are at the whim of your instructors personal beliefs, and personality.
    so yes my advice is bite the bullet, do the papers, remember why you went into nursing school and "git er done".

    hang in there, i am sure as you go along your will hear stories of clinical nightmares from other student and nurses, you are not alone!!
    boot camp? what???

    having been in the military (and i can't even believe i'm going to say this), i have to say that summation is a bit far-fetched.

    people cannot arbitrarily name themselves the supreme authority, which this woman may have done. nursing school is not and should not be "boot camp". writing papers on lying is asinine and childish - it's something we did in grade school, and certainly should not be required of adults in a college-level program.

    if the op is indeed telling the truth - there is no clear-cut, black-and-white, written policy on smoking, then this instructor doesn't have a leg to stand on.

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