Oregon strike - page 4

I heard there is a pending strike in Oregon. A friend was asking me about it. Has anyone heard about that?... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from zenman
    Mother Theresa had a reputation and it was not always nice!! I don't think most nurses strike only for the money...but it always seems to be in the contract somewhere. I worked a strike once...at a lower pay than my independant practice, until I went into OT. It just happened that I moved into the location and nurses had just started a strike. Merely fate. But does the raise nurses get equal the amount they lost out on strike?

    Try to stay cool on this hot issue or the mods will shut this thread down.
    That is why it can be worth it! You and I both know, it's not just about money, most times, zen. So yes, it can be worth it in the long run, if working conditions and patient safety are improved as a result. Like said before, nurses do NOT strike lightly and without some real deep thought.

    There was a time when we were talking about a walkout where I worked some years ago. A telephone poll was conducted to see where people stood on the issue of a possible strike. Well, let me tell you, It struck fear and worry in my heart, just the mere thought----- it did NOT inspire excitement or joy. But, I said I would do it, when the issues raised were about things like safe staffing ratios, benefits and yes, a raise. But, believe me, It's about more than money.

    You could say, striking nurses don't want to rely on "fate" but rather, control their destinies and those of their patients.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 23, '05
  2. by   fallonrn
    You bet I'm self serving only in nursing to got to CRNA school. But I admit it freely. All I hear from a lot of nurses on here is how bad we scabs are, as if unions aren't totally self serving. The CNA in California is totally self serving. If you want to take less patients then deduct it from your pay on a ratio basis. If you currently take six patients then everyone you give up let the hospital take 15% from you. This idea that hospitals and administrtors are money grubbing slave drivers is ludicrous. If your job sucks that much then leave!!!
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from fallonrn
    You bet I'm self serving only in nursing to got to CRNA school. But I admit it freely. All I hear from a lot of nurses on here is how bad we scabs are, as if unions aren't totally self serving. The CNA in California is totally self serving. If you want to take less patients then deduct it from your pay on a ratio basis. If you currently take six patients then everyone you give up let the hospital take 15% from you. This idea that hospitals and administrtors are money grubbing slave drivers is ludicrous. If your job sucks that much then leave!!!
    Or.....................

    change conditions so it's reasonable to stay, for me and for others. Not to mention, it may be better for patients, too! Gee, you want to be a patient on the receiving end of an RN who takes 15% more to take more patients in her load? Wow excellent advocacy!!!!

    Yes, staying, fighting for what is fair and right. That would be the alternative to job-hopping and running away from one's troubles. Staying yet, EFFECTING change is the harder thing to do, I guess, hmmm.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 23, '05
  4. by   fallonrn
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Or.....................

    change conditions so it's reasonable to stay, for me and for others. Not to mention, it may be better for patients, too! Gee, you want to be a patient on the receiving end of an RN who takes 15% more to take more patients in her load? Wow excellent advocacy!!!!

    Yes, staying, fighting for what is fair and right. That would be the alternative to job-hopping and running away from one's troubles. Staying yet, EFFECTING change is the harder thing to do, I guess, hmmm.

    Took me a little while to learn this, but like a spouse you ain't gonna change anything. You either put up with it or leave
  5. by   zenman
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Or.....................

    change conditions so it's reasonable to stay, for me and for others. Not to mention, it may be better for patients, too!

    Yes, That would be the alternative to job-hopping and running away from one's troubles. Staying yet, EFFECTING change is the harder thing to do, I guess, hmmm.
    Effecting change is hard...but is the warrior approach the best way?

    I'm going to leave my current position after 2 years because I realize that I will not change much here, mainly because it's a cultural issue...and I don't have a thousand years to break that. So much easier to go to that new place down the street where things are better...according to my buddies who are there now...waiting on me :chuckle
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from zenman
    Effecting change is hard...but is the warrior approach the best way?

    I'm going to leave my current position after 2 years because I realize that I will not change much here, mainly because it's a cultural issue...and I don't have a thousand years to break that. So much easier to go to that new place down the street where things are better...according to my buddies who are there now...waiting on me :chuckle
    Zen where did I say it was" best" ? Did you read my post about where we were polled as to whether to strike or not where I worked? If you did, you know better how I feel.

    TALKS are BEST. NEGOTIATING IS BEST, striking is and should be a LAST RESORT, only. NO ONE takes it lightly or takes joy in striking, believe me.....

    Thankfully, In our case, it never came to that, as talks finally succeeded, both sides got some of what they wanted. Neither "triumphed" but we lived with the new terms. It was a good change for us, however.

    Negotiation is always best, but failing that, in extreme circumstances, sometimes people have to take a stand. If you want to call that being a warrior, so be it.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 23, '05
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from fallonrn
    Took me a little while to learn this, but like a spouse you ain't gonna change anything. You either put up with it or leave
    wrong. Where I worked, we got a LOT of what we wanted and things improved VASTLY when our union was put in place. But I don't expect people as staunchly anti-union as yourself to believe a word I say. I just can only speak from my experiences, having worked in both environments over the years.
  8. by   begalli
    This thread is full of carp and ridiculous. I was the first person to mention the word "scab" here.

    SCAB is what a person who breaks a picket line to work during which time the union workers are on strike. It's a very generalized nasty term and it's as old as the hills. There can be steel-worker scabs. Auto-worker scabs. Hotel-worker scabs. And Nurse scabs.

    Why is there so much hostility in this thread? MY union is NOT self-serving. ANd I take complete offense to the accusations of what my motives would be if we had to, god forbid, go on strike. ACTUALLY - my union has a NO-STRIKES or Lockouts part written into the contract!

    I acknowledge that people can have strong feelings in opposition to unions. I had a nursing instructor who was completely against unions because of her memories as a child and her dad being out on strike and how hard it was for her family to keep food on the table, shoes on kids feet, and the emotional turmoil it caused her mom and dad. SHe never disagreed that the reason for the strike wasn't justified. She also made it CLEAR that she would NEVER break a picket line.
    Last edit by begalli on Feb 24, '05
  9. by   begalli
    Quote from fallonrn
    This idea that hospitals and administrtors are money grubbing slave drivers is ludicrous.
    While you're sitting in your well-paid (or not. maybe you should scab somewhere else that pays more) cush assignment (cause you know the hospital is going to make it as easy as possible for the scabs), why not do some reading about HCA or Tenet?

    I really, really don't get you.

    All done.
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Nevermind.


    steph
  11. by   begalli
    Quote from fallonrn
    unions benefit the most worthless among staff, maybe that's why you are so pro union.
    So fallon I wonder if it's alright with you if at you local airport, the airline mechanics union felt that their working conditions were unsafe and jeopordized passenger safety? And they haven't had even a cost of living raise in the past 4-5 years.

    Would you be alright with having mechanics come in from all over the country, not at all familiar with this particular airport and just do the jobs that the striking workers do? Or should the dissatisfied workers just suck it up and do the job. Maybe taking some short cuts to get the job done and not go on strike at all?

    It's a bit different than nursing but the concept is the same. If it were my airport, I would want the mechanics working on the jet that just carried my son to Seattle today to feel that they have what they need to work with and have some sense of job satisfaction. And, I would not appreciate anyone coming in to damper the process of negotiation.

    Do you think those striking workers are truely worthless?
    Last edit by begalli on Feb 24, '05
  12. by   fergus51
    Quote from fallonrn
    unions benefit the most worthless among staff, maybe that's why you are so pro union.
    This is incredibly rude. Do you really think you can judge someone's nursing ability by their opinions on unions?

    I can't believe people would say that it's unionizing that makes nurses look unprofessional...
  13. by   fallonrn
    Try firing someone in a union. IT basicly takes an act of congress which wouldn't happen at an at will employer. In a union everyone gets the same raises no matter how productive you are. Unions promote a less than stellar attitude among staff (not referring to just RN's but all staff)

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