Nursing, Hurricanes, and Floods.

  1. This will be my first experience being a nurse during what could turn out to be a catagory 3 hurricane. I work ON the coast. My hospital literally has a view of the entire beach. I'll be there as the storm is making landfall.

    Any other nurse experience being a nurse on duty while a hurricane is hitting? What was your experience like?

    Im also concerned because I feel going to work is mandatory and I'm not sure what to do with my mom whom is a senior now and has no one else but me here in Texas.
    Last edit by Brian S. on Aug 25
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  2. 84 Comments

  3. by   pixierose
    No experience here (just snowstorms), but sending you well wishes for both you and your mom (worrying about mom must be a little overwhelming ... on top of your job).

    Keep safe ❤️.
  4. by   NurseSpeedy
    I've been through a few. Each hospital is different but showing up is definitely mandatory. Some have been fired for calling in. One allowed family to stay on our vacant floor. Another allowed children to come and even had a childcare service offered free of charge. One sent a 4x4 off-roading vehicle to our homes to pick us up if our vehicles couldn't make it.
  5. by   CardiacDork
    Quote from NurseSpeedy
    I've been through a few. Each hospital is different but showing up is definitely mandatory. Some have been fired for calling in. One allowed family to stay on our vacant floor. Another allowed children to come and even had a childcare service offered free of charge. One sent a 4x4 off-roading vehicle to our homes to pick us up if our vehicles couldn't make it.

    My biggest worry is truly not being able to make it. I mean if the roads are flooded, am I suppose to risk my life to make it to work? Sigh. I guess we will see how this plays out.

    I already bought 50 bottles of water, batteries, flash lights, 2 large jars of PB, two large loafs of bread, cans cans and more cans. Nuts nuts and more nuts. Dried fruit and of course gummy bears. I'm gonna leave the most of these things for my mom and pack my own emergency bag and extra clothes for work.
  6. by   llg
    Pack a suitcase and be prepared to stay at the hospital for an extra couple of days -- which probably won't be necessary, but you should play it safe and be prepared for the worst. You wouldn't want to be caught with no clean clothes, no medications, toiletries, etc. We also ask our staff to bring bedding (pillow, sheets, etc.) so that we don't have to use patient supplies for staff sleeping over. People at your hospital should be able to tell you how they have managed such situations in the past. General rule of thumb: Get to the place where you will need to be during the storm before the weather gets too bad -- because once it gets bad, it is too late.

    Make plans for your mother NOW. Actually, they should have been made long ago. Either get her moved inland or arrange with someone to watch out for her if she is not able to take care of herself in an emergency. If nothing else is available, you need to assess whether she will be safe at home alone or whether she needs to go to a local shelter before the weather gets bad. Once it gets bad, it's too late to do anything but hunker down and wait for it to be over. Again, your local resources should have lists of supplies needed, etc.

    Is this your first hurricane? Or is this just your first hurricane as a nurse?
  7. by   CardiacDork
    Quote from llg
    Pack a suitcase and be prepared to stay at the hospital for an extra couple of days -- which probably won't be necessary, but you should play it safe and be prepared for the worst. You wouldn't want to be caught with no clean clothes, no medications, toiletries, etc. We also ask our staff to bring bedding (pillow, sheets, etc.) so that we don't have to use patient supplies for staff sleeping over. People at your hospital should be able to tell you how they have managed such situations in the past. General rule of thumb: Get to the place where you will need to be during the storm before the weather gets too bad -- because once it gets bad, it is too late.

    Make plans for your mother NOW. Actually, they should have been made long ago. Either get her moved inland or arrange with someone to watch out for her if she is not able to take care of herself in an emergency. If nothing else is available, you need to assess whether she will be safe at home alone or whether she needs to go to a local shelter before the weather gets bad. Once it gets bad, it's too late to do anything but hunker down and wait for it to be over. Again, your local resources should have lists of supplies needed, etc.

    Is this your first hurricane? Or is this just your first hurricane as a nurse?

    I think my mom will be able to care for herself. I'm just worrying excessively. She works full time as massage therapist and is fit and healthy apart from her hypertension. I bought her food and supplies and our apartment is on the second story. She is also inviting a friend over. My mom is 60 years old in September.

    This is my second hurricane actively in the hurricane.
    My first hurricane was Hurricane Rita which we evacuated for. Second hurricane was Ike which we stayed and it SUCKED!!! We were without power for almost 2 weeks and I had to eat MREs and stand on like for water.

    This will be my third hurricane. This is my first hurricane as an RN on duty.
  8. by   llg
    It sounds like you know the score -- and know what to do. Just be sure you take whatever you will need for a few days when you go into work -- and be prepared to stay for the duration if need by.
  9. by   RNperdiem
    If you drive, be aware of where you park your car. If there is a parking deck, try to park up high.
  10. by   CardiacDork
    Quote from RNperdiem
    If you drive, be aware of where you park your car. If there is a parking deck, try to park up high.
    Definitely, I've thought of this. I'm parking in the parking garage high up.
  11. by   Meeshie
    Have you talked to your job about this? Ours allows us to bring dependents/family to shelter in place. We also have an emergency work list that splits our workers in half. Half are expected to show up before the storm and stay for the duration. The other half show up afterwards so that the first half can go home. We have a list of things we're expected to bring including enough water/food/clothing for three days (though water and food will be provided unless something goes wrong).
  12. by   sallyrnrrt
    I worked thou both Rita and Ike?......BRUTAL IN THAT aC was not on emergency generator lines..... Learned to appreciate cold water showers ...
  13. by   CardiacDork
    Quote from sallyrnrrt
    I worked thou both Rita and Ike?......BRUTAL IN THAT aC was not on emergency generator lines..... Learned to appreciate cold water showers ...

    Are you serious ...!?!? No A/C? What? I don't wanna sound like a brat but how the hell am I suppose to work with NO A/C? :/
  14. by   VaccineQueen
    Lifelong Floridian here and been through my fair share of hurricanes. At the hospital we were encouraged to bring immediate family members and a change of clothes. We were warned that we were expected to make it into our shift on time, and if weather conditions were going to be bad that we should "plan ahead" i.e. leave really, really early for work but we won't pay you once you get here but show up or you might lose your job. One nurse who called off due to unsafe conditions ended up losing her job, but she called all our holidays, so I think that was cumulative?

    If family isn't welcome you might want to take your mom to a shelter depending on needs. When I worked for the state we had several people of varying age ranges show up at shelters and all were welcome.

    Most importantly, make sure your prescriptions are full, you have food, and you have clothes. OH! And that you made arrangements for your pets as well!

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