Nurses crossing picket lines?? - page 2

My friend, who is an experienced travel RN, is thinking about taking a job where she will make $5,000 a week pay, but she has to go to another state and cross a picket line to get to work. I know a... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from zenman
    I don't care to hear any comments from pro union folks.
    Ah yea, this says it all right here. Funny, no one here who is "pro-union" said a thing about not caring to hear anything from the opposing side. A wee bit arrogant, aren't we. And you asked "when will it end?" Well, it's just a guess, but it might be when companies treat nurses (and other workers) like the valuable commodities and humans they are. When they don't bottomline everyone to death---- while the CEO's and executives guard to the death their 6 to 7 figure incomes ,all the while asking everyone else to cinch up their belts. MAYBE, when they elect to stop treating them like lowly serfs in some workplaces, rather than the skillfull professionals they are. Then and only then, do I see "it ending". Til then, people who elect to scab should do just fine. .
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Jul 7, '04
  2. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Woooot!

    You go, SmilingBluEyes!
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Hmmmm, let's see...
    1. Few if any, enforcable child labor laws.
    2.Disenfranchised, poverty stricken workers who do not have the power or resources to demand fair wages, hours, and working condtions, but no doubt would if they could.
    3. Being able to legally pollute the environment of other nations with abandon, without objection by people who are so economically depressed and oppressed by their governments that they have no means or right to say anything about it.
    4. No minimum wage laws.
    5. No regulatory or oversight organizations, just to name a few.




    .

    just to name a few...................... :angryfire
  4. by   zenman
    Posted by Hellllllo Nurse: Randall, you say that busdrivers, nurses, etc "harm the very people they serve" when they strike.

    But if they feel thay are being mistreated by an employer, should nurses become martyrs, thereby harming themselves to avoid upsetting people w/ a strike?
    No, nurses don't have to be martyrs, but many are. The profession has yet to become powerful, especially considering the number of them out there.

    Since you were helping the hospital out of a jam that they helped create, they may have treated you very differently than they treated regular staff.
    I think they were too busy to worry about us, but as I said before, the hospital "deserves" a union. Do you know what I mean by that?

    People who are being treated well don't display the anger that you desribed. Most people who are that pi$$ed off have a REASON.
    Oh, they probably had a reason (few hospitals are known for creative management) but nurses also have a responsibility to be the best they can be in their job, including helping each other and respecting everyone on a unit. The things I heard about what went on daily in respect to patient care didn't impress me.

    You come off as very macho, smug, and arrogant in your reply.
    Don't do the projection bit. Reality therapy is reality therapy. I'm merely comparing my past experience (in 10 hospitals) with this one. Truth hurts sometimes.
  5. by   zenman
    Posted by alk3rainbow: Wow coming from a family of blue collared workers, I'm extremely offended. Get off your high horse. Being a "professional" doesn't make you better then anyone else. Blue collared workers aren't ignorant people, they just picked a different profession and thank god someone did because we need our plumbers and electricians and garbage men.
    As usual nurses are reacting instead of responding. I'm also from a family of blue collar workers and the only one of 5 kids that even went to college. In spite of all my degrees, I'm just a beach bum and prefer working in the ranks rather than management. I didn't say that I was better than anyone else. I just consider nurses to be professionals and to act that way...at least at work!! But let's compare "blue collared workers" in the USA, let's say plumbers, bricklayers, with the same workers in Germany, for example. The ones here don't hold a candle to the "craftsmen" over there. Don't forgot the dock workers union, who's members can make over $100,000 a year loading and unloading ships. We all pay for that great salary.

    ... I don't see how picketing for better working conditions is a bad thing. Sometimes it is the only way to get administrators to listen.
    The "only way?" No, it's not and this is what keeps us impotent and only allows a few to have more than others. The "warrior" approach is not the best way in our case. Have you realized that yet? Perhaps this is why union membership is declining...someone is catching on.
  6. by   zenman
    Posted by HelllloNurse: Most nurses who strike do not do so for higher wages- they do it because of manditory overtime, poor working conditions, too many pts per nurse, abd poor treatment by mgmt.
    I agree with you, but for some reason wages always seem to be in the package. But that's ok. However, let me confront a few of you guys. Did you know what the salary range (and salary compression) as well as all the negative aspects of this profession were before you signed on? Are you just now complaining cause you didn't get a clue during nursing school? Did you talk to the staff of your hospital before you signed on...or just walked in totally clueless. (I know some may only have one hospital in town to work at, but you do have choices).
  7. by   zenman
    Posted by SmilingBluEyes: Ah yea, this says it all right here. Funny, no one here who is "pro-union" said a thing about not caring to hear anything from the opposing side. A wee bit arrogant, aren't we.
    I've already heard all the "talk" from union guys, so you're wasting my time to repeat it. No, I'm not arrogant; I can just see both sides of the picture. Were you around when hundreds of hospitals had to close? I was part of a chain of 50 hospitals that closed just 5-6 years ago because they couldn't stay alive. Are you familar with reimbursement today? Have you talked to all the doctors that are barely making it. You make more than many of them. I know some that clear $30,000 a year!

    And you asked "when will it end?" Well, it's just a guess, but it might be when companies treat nurses (and other workers) like the valuable commodities and humans they are. When they don't bottomline everyone to death---- while the CEO's and executives guard to the death their 6 to 7 figure incomes ,all the while asking everyone else to cinch up their belts. MAYBE, when they elect to stop treating them like lowly serfs in some workplaces, rather than the skillfull professionals they are. Then and only then, do I see "it ending". Til then, people who elect to scab should do just fine.
    Yes, some people make obscene salaries, including college coaches...but do thay earn it? Do the players? Depending on the size of the hospital, 6-7 figure incomes are normal. They get paid to be cost-effective. Now, if we all can figure out how to keep the hospital afloat with today's reimbursement. It will end when you figure out what to do. Some of you know.
  8. by   husker-nurse
    I have a feeling that there will be a LOT of posts to this one! As a UNION Nurse who just ratified a contract last week for better wages, insurance and better staffing, I will say that, yes, I knew going in what I was heading into. I also knew that I was working in a UNION SHOP, and was way more comfortible with specific rules in place than the "other" hospital that I had just left, where one never knew what what happen next! I have been a meatcutter and a saw-operator and a cleaning woman, and am not ashamed to admit it. The world needs the worker bees, you know? That's one of the benefits of our great country. One question, though, have you ever turned down any of the benefits that the union has gained for the hospitals in which you have worked? I will venture a guess; NO!
    Last edit by gwenith on Jul 7, '04 : Reason: personal attack
  9. by   RoxyBen
    Quote from alk3rainbow
    Wow coming from a family of blue collared workers, I'm extremely offended. Get off your high horse. Being a "professional" doesn't make you better then anyone else. Blue collared workers aren't ignorant people, they just picked a different profession and thank god someone did because we need our plumbers and electricians and garbage men. They work hard and they deserve good working conditions just as nurses do, and I don't see how picketing for better working conditions is a bad thing. Sometimes it is the only way to get administrators to listen.
    I have to agree with the above. Being a "professional" doesn't make us better and electricians, plumbers and garbage men make more money then we do! :angryfire
  10. by   fergus51
    I just have to laugh, cause everytime I read blanket criticisms of unions the poster never says what the better solutions are. It's usually just a blanket "nurses have to realize their own power and not unionize"....
  11. by   ResearchRN
    It seems to me that "scab" is a derogatory term directed at specific individuals. I doubt that this site would tolerate the use of other derogatory terms related to race, religion, sexual orientation etc. Scab sounds just as bad to me. I also think people who use the term sound ignorant.

    I have worked in a union environment and would never cross a picket line. However, last time I checked this was the United States of America where people are free to do whatever they want. Some people believe in and support unions, others do not.

    Calling someone a name because they don't believe or think the way you do is hateful, immature and unprofessional.
  12. by   fergus51
    This is a term those nurses choose to use themselves. There is even a website scabs.org or something. I don't know another name for them that doesn't have a negative connotation.
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Exactly fergus. Scabs call themselves this name, as well. Many wear it like a badge, quite proudly. So I don't see it being hateful....and whether we agree or not,this is what they are known by, on both sides of the issue.

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