Nurse is a nurse is a nurse - page 5

We really need to do something about the publics understanding of nursing. I'm starting to get really ticked about this and I'm far far from a prideful person. I'm just tired of people not realizing... Read More

  1. by   Agnus
    o
    Last edit by Agnus on May 18, '03
  2. by   Agnus
    Originally posted by liberalrn
    , how does this image of nursing "help" our culture? Does it persist b/c people in general dislike thinking about disease and death and by elevating nurses to a "special" status, it distances them from the harsh reality of disease and death? I mean, if we are perceived as angels of mercy.....angels have no needs (well, human ones anyway).....does anyone see what I'm getting at?
    Yes.
    The image may help our culture but it does nothing for our profession which is made up of living breathing flesh and blood humans who really do deal with "the harsh reality of disease and death."
  3. by   Agnus
    I am going out and renting WIT.

    In reference to the posts about not being able to identify who is a nurse.
    A Doc, asked for a particular patient's nurse.

    The charge nurse said that she believed that the nurse was in that patient's room.

    The Doctor responded, "Oh, that was the nurse? She was wearing all white. So I didn't think she could possibly be a nurse."
  4. by   liberalrn
    Agnus--thanks for the reply. "Wit" is fantastic--I keep thinking about it. Will most likely rent it again...there is alot there and not jsut about nursing. I think you will appreciate it!
    As far I can tell, no-one on the thread has said that LPN's cannot call themselves nurse. I noted that most of us got our knicker twisted w/ MA's, CNA's amd techs calling themselves nurses. I think in my pediatrician's office that maybe there are 2 RN's, the rest are all techs (hwat the flip is a tech anyway--do they have CNA training? Just how accurate are the BP's they're taking?)
  5. by   prmenrs
    If you rent WIT, be sure there's plenty of Kleenex in the house!! That said, it is an amazing movie.
  6. by   RN2007
    Imenid37, You are right. But, another thing, - the CNA's, MA's, etc...., who are wrongly doing nursing duties not only do not have extra education and a nurses license to further confirm it, but also would not be legally responsible if they did something wrong that caused a lawsuit that hurt or even killed a patient. I bet the dr. would get in BIG trouble if the licensing boards knew what he was having the MA's do.

    But on the other hand, I can probably see where nursing assistants who are referred to constantly by their patients, drs., etc., at some point quit correcting people, because on their own badges that they wear, part of the name of their occupation says Nurse. And by the way, I have never been a nursing assistant, so I have no reason to say this other than it is my opinion.

    I know there are sooo many occupations that the licensed professionals become upset by non-licensed people in their field calling themselves the real thing. For instance, a paralegal is not a lawyer, PA is not a Dr., etc. etc.... A personal example I have is that my husband has been a licensed architect for over 18 years and there are many misconceptions regarding what an architect is. Some "architectural drafters", engineers,
    home designers, etc., etc., call themselves architects. However, with the exception in just one or two states, an architect is a person who is licensed and registered to be an architect, has had a minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Architecture if it was a degree that was obtainied many years ago, or today the new students graduating from college must have a Masters Degree in Architecture before fulfilling all the manyother requirements it takes before you are allowed to sit for a several day architecture exam. Then, if you pass the exam of which has a very high fail rate the first time, you are an architect. Also, to confuse things further, there are really "landscape architects" but of course they do not deal with the architecture of residential and commercial buildings like an "Architect" does.

    Anyway, sometimes I really think that just the name of jobs sometimes implies something about the job that causes confusion, and of course we were not the ones who made up the names for all of these jobs. Also, I bet sometimes people get tired of explaining to others that, "No, I am not a nurse, I am a ............." However, I think if an employer asks us to do something that we are legally not supposed to do and it is also something that we have not been trained for in school, that we need to let our employers know that we cannot do that because we do not want to be held liable in the future in case of problems. After all, we are talking about peoples lives..
  7. by   SandySummers
    Replying to many of the posts...

    The muscular African-American guy on the J&J campaign is an LPN--The director of the J&J told me.

    I am really loving all of this concern about the nursing image on this thread. I believe that a more positive image is very useful. It will help recruitment and retention of nurses. Once society understands what nurses do, money managers will direct more resources toward nursing and improve our staffing and they will also funnel more money toward nursing education and research--all necessary for our profession to grow.

    Our organization exists to improve public understanding of nurses and to improve the image of nurses. Please check out our extensive (and very nurse-empowering) media reviews of:
    ER
    http://www.nursingadvocacy.org/media/tv/er.html

    Wit
    http://www.nursingadvocacy.org/media/films/wit.html

    One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest:
    http://www.nursingadvocacy.org/media...koos_nest.html

    MDs
    http://www.nursingadvocacy.org/media/tv/mds.html

    and others.

    Also, regarding an empowering television show about nurses...we have commissioned a pilot of a television show about nurses that is so empowering to read, it will make you feel wonderful to be a nurse:
    http://www.nursingadvocacy.org/create/human.html

    We are working to find Hollywood connections to get it produced. If you have any leads, please send them along.

    And please let us know what you think! Thanks,

    Sandy Summers, MSN, MPH, RN
    Executive Director
    The Center for Nursing Advocacy
  8. by   flashpoint
    If the guy in the J&J commercial is an LPN, why doesn't the commercial identify him as an LPN at the end when they show everyone's name and title? Every nurse on the commercial is identified as an RN.
  9. by   SC RN
    Originally posted by liberalrn
    Agnus--thanks for the reply. "Wit" is fantastic--I keep thinking about it. Will most likely rent it again...there is alot there and not jsut about nursing. I think you will appreciate it!
    As far I can tell, no-one on the thread has said that LPN's cannot call themselves nurse. I noted that most of us got our knicker twisted w/ MA's, CNA's amd techs calling themselves nurses. I think in my pediatrician's office that maybe there are 2 RN's, the rest are all techs (hwat the flip is a tech anyway--do they have CNA training? Just how accurate are the BP's they're taking?)
    How accurate are the BP's? How accurate are yours? Come on, liberalrn, I think you don't really feel how this statement came out. Or at least, I hope you don't.

    Nurse Techs, at least where I work, are CNA's. And CNA's in the state of California, are given a written and clinical test before they become certifed. Blood pressure is a required skill and it is tested and you must pass ... sure, the CNA's may not have as much experience taking BP's but they sure know how to do it correctly. If they don't, then some teacher needs a talking to.

    Let's give CNA's and Nurse Techs some credit ... they work hard, get paid very little, and help out the "real" nurses quite a bit. :kiss
  10. by   gwenith
    RE: Administration of Medication by non- nursing personnel

    This has cropped up as a concern by a number of posters on this thread and is a real concern. Here in Queensland our Therapeutic Goods Act /aka/ Drug Administration act describes who can and cannot ADMINISTER drugs however, there is an "out" anyone can "assist" a person to take thier own medications - so that residents in hostel accomodation can have "Webster" packs made by the local pharmacy and the resident can have anyone help them take that medication but, that is not regarded as "administration" under the act.

    Some of the problem with administration is the reliance within the nursing profession itself on only a limited competency in relation to drug administration. Here the most common competency revolves aroung medication calculations. The second most common revolves around the "5/6 Rights of medication administration" Forgive me but given enough time I could probably teach a Baboon those skills. What differentiates the requirements of drug administration skill for registered nurses is the ability to assess and evaluate the effect of the medication upon the patient. This is particularly important when it comes to PRN and titratable dosages where the dose MUST be regulated against physiological response.

    Even the base skill of giving an NSAID to a patient requires the RN to first assess if this will be adequate to the patient requirements (i.e. do they need a stronger pain reliever) and then to evaluate the response (i.e. are they still in pain?) and even to evaluate if there is a "complimentary" intervention that will achieve the desired outcome (i.e. breathing exercises warm pack etc).

    If we are to maintain our professional standing we must give cognizance to the complexities of our day to day duties and not "sell ourselves short" by only looking at the surface of the task. I am more than a pill dispenser which is why I do not feel threatened by others doing so, I do feel threatened by my professions inability to percieve the extent of my role in this regard because if WE do not see our scope of practice correctly then no-one else will and we will lose not only this area of practice but other areas as well.
    Last edit by gwenith on May 19, '03
  11. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I have seen the movie "Wit" several times. It moves me to tears and makes me proud to be a nurse each time I see it.
  12. by   healingtouchRN
    do ya rent this one? is it on VHS?
  13. by   liberalrn
    SC RN: I meant it exactly as written. I do not feel that it is "flip" to question the skills of the people "assessing" my children's vital signs. I was directly referring to my pediatrician's office where there are ( as far as I know) 2 RN's and the rest are "Techs". As far as I am aware, "tech" is a generic term that anyone can hide behind (like nutritionist or psychotherapist or life coach). There are no licensing requirements to be a tech. If "techs" are CNA's; why do they not call themselves CNA's? What is wrong with being a certified nursing assistant? Is "Tech" more glamorous sounding...or is it easier to pawn off unlicensed personnel on an unsuspecting lay public? Why not say, I'm a CNA and I will be working with you today." How is that shameful or difficult?
    I have alot of respect for CNA's --their jobs are hard and their work is honorable. I count myself fortunate that I work with several dedicated and caring CNA's --and they proudly call themselves that. A Tech could be anybody and often is.
    This is jsut another example of how nomenclature can clarify and confuse issues...but that's another thread!

    "Wit" is available on VHS at the video store...don't know about DVD.

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