Night Shift For Newbies - page 5

most of us don't get much choice over whether or not we work nights, although we might get a choice about when. we also get a choice about how we handle our night rotations. there are plusses and... Read More

  1. Visit  adventure780 profile page
    0
    very informative article, thanks so much for the tips! I am taking your advice and going to go to bed now so I am energized for my next shift and can get some things done before my next shift. Doesn't matter what shift you are working, you need rest and food, along with keeping hyrdated.
  2. Visit  Poochiewoochie profile page
    0
    Loved my nurses when I was in the hospital but I wish they would have not been so noisy at night when the patients were trying to sleep. Yes, the hospital is not the Hilton but you'd think the nurses would have a little more consideration for patients. We are not in the hospital because we want to be; either we have just had surgery or were admitted for some other medical reason. We need our sleep and don't need to be kept awake by rude and loud nurses chit chatting about their weekend plans or what they had for dinner.
  3. Visit  forbidden2know profile page
    0
    I want to become a CNA, or I should say, I think I want to become a CNA. I was wondering if perhaps a hospital or nursing home would let me volunteer, to see if that's the type of job for me.
  4. Visit  forbidden2know profile page
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    One more thought/question, when a patient expires/dies, is it the responsibility of a CNA to ? what? what does a CNA do in a case of death? What are they responsible for?
  5. Visit  GitanoRN profile page
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    4 new hirees came in for orientation today 2 RN's and 1 LPN, and 1 CNA, and all 4 are for the night shift, I still give these nurses props for being able manage the grave-yard shift....Aloha~
  6. Visit  LJ85 profile page
    1
    Quote from forbidden2know
    One more thought/question, when a patient expires/dies, is it the responsibility of a CNA to ? what? what does a CNA do in a case of death? What are they responsible for?
    I would say postmortem care, notifying the nurse, and if you have good coworkers they will help you. It's never an easy job. I was a CNA before nursing and I know how hard the job is, props to you guys!
    adventure780 likes this.
  7. Visit  LJ85 profile page
    0
    Quote from forbidden2know
    I want to become a CNA, or I should say, I think I want to become a CNA. I was wondering if perhaps a hospital or nursing home would let me volunteer, to see if that's the type of job for me.
    Lol if you volunteer you might decide against it. Just jump in if you wanna do it. It's a very demanding job but also rewarding. You may not always get the appreciation you deserve but you are the back bone of the facility.
  8. Visit  LJ85 profile page
    0
    Quote from GitanoRN

    The 5 hour energy works, however, don't drink more than it's recommended or you'll end up in a mess
    Ut oh lol
  9. Visit  SuzieeQ profile page
    1
    Great article! Back when I did nights, I found that it took about 2-3 months to adjust to it... After that, I only slept about 3 hours each day when I got home and became a non-sleeping zombie. I only lasted 7 months on full-time nights then switched back to days. I too drove home often with the windows open in January with the music blaring! LOL
    adventure780 likes this.
  10. Visit  MedChica profile page
    0
    This was great.
    I'll be starting on the nightshift. At first, I wanted to be on days...because, I guess, it's better to start 'hard' and go to 'easy'.
    But I've thinking about it and seeing the benefits of nightshift.
    Days are hectic and I'll be able to settle into a routine, further my learning and improve my skills when management's out, the residents are mostly down and things are a little quieter.

    I'm somewhat fearful of what can go wrong, though. Sleep...?
    Until I gain more exp, I'll be far too skittish to sleep.
    What if someone dies?
    No, seriously....LOL

    It's 'no big deal' to the veterans. But... I'm new.
    So, if you need me? I'll be standing in a doorway. Counting respirations and silently 'clutching my pearls'....
    LOL

    Where I work? I get the feeling that most either can't or don't want to do nightshift. It's weird. I'm used to people fighting to get off days. I've always liked nights. Worked them as a tech(xray/ct) and for us? You're the only one in the dept.
    So, at least with nursing? I'll have company.
    But - I like going home when everyone's coming in. I like not being in traffic.
    I like having my days empty. I always slept less on nights, too. It always felt like I had way more time to myself.
    I'll be honest: I've never liked any work-day that began at 6 and 7am. LOL It's too early in the morning to be doing anything.
    No matter how much I sleep, I still have to drag myself out of bed.

    The drawback? I never ate well on 'nights'. Never. I'd raid those machines and fill up on chocolate, 'sub sandwiches' and Coke.
    That will have to change. I know.
  11. Visit  rnfostermom profile page
    1
    I've worked nights for 7 years now, the first 5 working 8hr shifts, and the last few working 12s. I have to say that working 12 hour nights is much harder for me. I'm kind of stuck with them because I really love my job, but I feel like my life is so out of whack with these hours. Even though I have more days off, I feel like my personal life is a mess. When I worked 8hr nights, I could work all night and still manage to get 7-8 hours of sleep in my off hours. We were fostering infants for a while, and I could help take care of them when I came home in the morning. On days off, I was able to switch to a "normal" sleep pattern fairly easily. I definitely felt more rested even though I felt like I was working every day as a 0.8 or 0.9. With 12s, I can't do anything on my work days, I can usually only manage to stay asleep for 4-6 hours, and my first off day after a stretch of working is completely lost to 12-15 hours of sleep and then lounging on the couch awake but too tired to actually get anything done.

    I've read lots of articles on this board about how other nurses manage their sleep working nights. I also read a Medscape article on the topic recently. Lately I've been finding that keeping my night schedule even on my off days (staying up all night and sleeping all day) has helped me to get a bit more sleep overall. I've decided to enroll in a completely online RN to BSN program so that I can start to feel like I am accomplishing something with my life during those nights when I'm sitting at home at 4am wide awake! My husband is a night owl, so at least we get our time to hang out together as well.

    I agree with the other RNs who commented about importance of Vitamin D. My doctor told me to take 2000 IU/day. I also take a Vitamin B supplement. I was doing this for a long time, but then got lazy last winter for several weeks. I ended up getting really sick twice in 2 weeks, a bad GI illness and then a horrible cold. I missed 3 days of work! Never miss taking my vitamins anymore!
    JulieL likes this.
  12. Visit  Aurora77 profile page
    0
    Quote from MedChica

    It's 'no big deal' to the veterans. But... I'm new.
    So, if you need me? I'll be standing in a doorway. Counting respirations and silently 'clutching my pearls'....
    LOL
    I love this! I can relate. Some of those patients can be really deep sleepers. I'd stand there with my little pen light, thinking "breathe, darn it." and getting so relieved. That feeling does go away, but I had it for a long time!
  13. Visit  DroogieRN profile page
    1
    I hate night shift for what it does to my life and my body but the shifts themselves? Love them. There is something great about the night shift vibe. No less busy most of the time, but different. And no families, procedures, meals -- heaven. At least insofar as heaven exists at the hospital. :-)
    wooh likes this.


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