New RN, terrified of codes and emergencies - page 2

Hi everyone, I'm a new RN and have only been on my own as a nurse for a little over a month. I have anxiety, which I have had for a long time, that is starting to creep into other areas of my... Read More

  1. by   RotorRunner
    Quote from Richard Wolfe
    No one survives a code and goes home with "no deficits".
    That's not true. I've participated in rescucitations where the patient had ROSC and ended up being discharged home without any deficits after therapeutic hypothermia.
  2. by   nursemike
    Quote from RotorRunner
    That's not true. I've participated in rescucitations where the patient had ROSC and ended up being discharged home without any deficits after therapeutic hypothermia.
    In my three most recent codes, I was the patient. Thanks to my ACLS training, I knew just what to do. I've had no permanent major deficits, so I guess I agree with you, but also a little with Richard. It's a lot to go through.

    A nurse manager I worked for for years had an interesting take on codes for new nurses: do compressions. It doesn't take a ton of brains, and you get to see everything. She always had a weird, but brilliant, way of looking at things.
  3. by   Lev <3
    I had a patient wake right up after being in cardiac arrest for 2 minutes til he got shocked.
  4. by   Lev <3
  5. by   dd05434
    Quote from Richard Wolfe
    No one survives a code and goes home with "no deficits".
    Well, they did. Not sure what else you want me to say.
  6. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from Richard Wolfe
    No one survives a code and goes home with "no deficits".
    That's not necessarily true. I've seen many a patient not only survive but thrive and walk out the door to go home perfectly intact. One patient I had was flown in following an MI, CPR in the field, was placed on hypothermia protocol, and was even posturing for a while. I swore it was going to be a bad outcome, but the day we warmed him, he opened his eyes, we pulled the tube and he asked for ice cream! Then he went home a few days later. Hypothermia is a miracle.
  7. by   popopopo
    Do you have mock codes on your unit? You can gather 2-3 coworkers and run through some mock codes to get the order of events down correctly. If you don't have mock codes implemented, this sounds like a great project.
  8. by   Crush
    Oh gosh, I recall my first code. I was so scared I would not know what to do and thought I would mess up or freeze. But when it happened, I just went into that adrenaline driven and I recalled everything I was ever taught about codes. I could not believe I did so well for my first time. I thought back to before the code and how anxious I was and all that fear for for nothing.

    My advise, practice codes on the unit rock ( ask your education dept about this if your unit does not do suprize mock codes ). Do a verbal "what would you do" with a co-worker. Write down the steps you would take. Know your feelings are completely normal. We all freak out a bit when a patient codes. It is all about going back to your training and continued training.

    Sounds like you have done well so far though.
  9. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from nursemike
    In my three most recent codes, I was the patient. Thanks to my ACLS training, I knew just what to do. I've had no permanent major deficits, so I guess I agree with you, but also a little with Richard. It's a lot to go through.

    A nurse manager I worked for for years had an interesting take on codes for new nurses: do compressions. It doesn't take a ton of brains, and you get to see everything. She always had a weird, but brilliant, way of looking at things.
    I'm confused. You were the patient in the code, but your ACLS training helped you know what to do? Do you mean that you knew to call 911 for your symptoms before coding? In general, all the patients that I have coded have been pretty unresponsive and not really actively involved. I'm curious what your situation was, if you don't mind sharing.
  10. by   dd05434
    I did a new grad program and we had 3 days of simulation and a TON of mock codes. For some reason I'm still anxious though.
  11. by   Crush
    That is ok. That is normal. You'll do fine and it sounds like you did ok. It is ok to be nervous as it means you care enough to be concerned and are asking questions. That is a good thing. No matter how well you know and have trained for situations, seeking to continue to learn, willingness to ask and being prepared are the key.
  12. by   nseone
    So when I finished Nursing school I was so afraid of a code I majored in psyche, hoping I would never start an IV or run a code. I just wanted to talk to my patients. At the time of my graduation there were not many jobs in mental health and after waiting 5 months with an offer a day to go to the ICU, I finally went to the ICU, scared ...and loved it. I stayed in the ICU for 15 years and then became Administrative supervisor for the hospital for the next 16 years. I started most of the IVs, and ran all the codes. When I heard trauma call or a code blue or SWAT(rapid Response) I said a silent prayer and ran to it not away from it. It was a very rewarding career and I wouldn't change a thing. You'll see.. :-)
  13. by   nursemike
    Quote from Julius Seizure
    I'm confused. You were the patient in the code, but your ACLS training helped you know what to do? Do you mean that you knew to call 911 for your symptoms before coding? In general, all the patients that I have coded have been pretty unresponsive and not really actively involved. I'm curious what your situation was, if you don't mind sharing.
    Sorry, I was being a butthead. My participation was entirely passive. Pretty much everything I did up to and during my heart attack was wrong. Just trying to take some undeserved credit for still being alive.

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