New nurses wanted. - page 7

by GrnTea 25,962 Views | 117 Comments

I have just read a post in a Nursing Specialties forum on Staff Development that makes reference to the need to recognize and nurture new nurses because the nursing-eat-their-young attitude is so widespread. I went to respond to... Read More


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    Quote from anotherone
    The trainwrecks are everywhere. and we have many new grads. they are split up. i dealt with it fine as have others. if i am to get them all now and still be expected to be at newer nurses beck and call i should be paid more. cant do your job then quit. they dont give the new attendings only easy pts...... you are a nurse , done with orientation, you get the same type of assignments as everyone else or should. we dont dump all the trainwrecks on the new grads or float nurses or any other paranoid victim memtality group. i can see that being the case for some, but on our floor you get what you get.
    I see your point and I don't have problems with trainwrecks even while being an orientee. I thrive under pressure and genuinely enjoy being busy. I prefer to work independently and don't require hand-holding so much as occasional clarification.......And although I really have no specific aspirations, my nurse manager recently told me that she would expect to see me in critical care in the not so distant future. I'm not entirely sure what that says about me as a new nurse, but I did find it interesting when I heard it. I also know that I am the exception and not the rule - so in that, I can definitely see where you're coming from.

    I do also see a few other newbies around me legitimately struggling and from an outside perspective it is clear (with one at least for certain) that much of that struggle is exacerbated by her having a preceptor who isn't very involved, though I'm sure her own hesitation and low level of confidence in herself plays a significant part as well. I wouldn't go so far as to describe her as possessing a "paranoid victim mentality" though, because for her, the scenario I described is very much a reality.
    Last edit by metal_m0nk on Feb 16, '13
    nurseladybug12 and anotherone like this.
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    To the seasoned nurses " to get respect you have to give it" just because someone is new, does not mean that they are not a human being and because of that they DESERVE respect also. I am over 40 yrs old, please do not talk to me as though I am a 2 yr old, it's very disrespectful and just plain rude. I almost want to ask some of the ruder ones if they were ever taught to be nice to their coworkers. I have been in a few other work environments other than healthcare and I can honestly say that I have never encountered this type of cattiness and rudness in a profession. I am learning what I DO NOT want to be as a nurse. The only way to change it is to STOP IT. If your doing it Stop it and if you witness it SAY SOMETHING to the person doing it!!!! Take action.
    nurseladybug12 likes this.
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    Again, and again, and again: Being corrected is not disrespectful, is not rudeness, is not a personal attack. If I really didn't give a sweet patootie about you, I wouldn't bother to correct you on anything, and I would let you continue on, and your manager would take care of my problem for me when you finally did something awful. However, in the meantime, the patients would suffer for both of our failings.

    As the multiple threads on dealing with rude patients and families attest, nurses need to develop a thicker skin than, say, librarians or chemists or grade-school teachers.

    Your perceptions are yours and you can do what you want with them, but you will miss out on a lot if you keep taking everything so personally. Dialing back the I'm-offended filter will serve you a world of good.

    For example, if you listen hard to them, you will learn something from those "rude" patients about their fears or their misconceptions or their circumstances that will open your eyes to their painful realities and make it possible for you to give them much better care than if you didn't.

    And you will learn something from those "rude" seasoned nurses, too. You might not appreciate it for what it truly is for a long time, but trust me on this one. Any older nurse can testify to the truth in it.
    llg, anotherone, Spidey's mom, and 3 others like this.
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    GrnTea-I really don't think that some of the seasoned nurses correct new nurses because "they care about them". Have you ever heard of people putting other people down to lift themselves up? It's called low self esteem. I am the first person to say correct me when I'm wrong, I want to learn and do things the right way, and futhermore I actually do have a thick skin. I have not gotten this far without being tough and persistent. Do not confuse my demand for respect for being a baby, thinskinned or any other adjective you can think of. I can tell that this is a losing battle, all I am saying is that it DOES exist. I and many other new nurses have learned quite a bit from some seasoned nurses that actually have people skills, that know how to say in a middle of a crazy day " I'm really crazy busy right now and don't have alot of time to answer questions, so if you could wait until the end of shift I will be glad to answer some of your questions", instead of not even acknowledging that I just asked a question or better yet the ever present sneer of disgust. It's called communication skills ladies, you have to communicate with the families don't you- so it is possible to have a crazy day/week and still know how to talk to one another.
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    While I agree that correction should not always be viewed as a personal attack or act of malice, it would be futile to say that the correction, and the reception of it, can be heavily influenced by the way it is delivered.

    If someone is tactless in their critique, then, of course, it will more than likely cause more problems than it solves. Now am I saying you must "sugar coat" things, most certainly not, these are adults we're working with, but you can't deliver a message in any kind of manner and expect someone to be receptive. There is a way to say things directly and professionally while causing minimal offense. If

    Now some people can handle a more...... Abrupt approach than others.

    For example: take an experienced individual who may have a background in a strict family or military, when speaking or correcting a lesser experienced person who may have a similar background, they may be able to bring across points a certain way without causing offense.

    Rudeness or brevity is never a requirement for a point to stick. You don't have to be rude to get a point across. There is a difference between assertiveness and aggression.

    Training a less experienced one calls for respect, open-mindless, tact, and tolerance from both the learner and the teacher. Tolerance is a key because we are always going to be surrounded by people, whether we are the experienced individual or inexperienced one, who make us want to "reach out and touch them", but in most cases we can't do that without causing more problems.......and losing our jobs. Lol.

    Some people will take offense no matter what you say or how you say it.
    Last edit by PatMac10,RN on Feb 18, '13
  6. 0
    Quote from milfordmom
    GrnTea-I really don't think that some of the seasoned nurses correct new nurses because "they care about them". Have you ever heard of people putting other people down to lift themselves up? It's called low self esteem. I am the first person to say correct me when I'm wrong, I want to learn and do things the right way, and futhermore I actually do have a thick skin. I have not gotten this far without being tough and persistent. Do not confuse my demand for respect for being a baby, thinskinned or any other adjective you can think of. I can tell that this is a losing battle, all I am saying is that it DOES exist. I and many other new nurses have learned quite a bit from some seasoned nurses that actually have people skills, that know how to say in a middle of a crazy day " I'm really crazy busy right now and don't have alot of time to answer questions, so if you could wait until the end of shift I will be glad to answer some of your questions", instead of not even acknowledging that I just asked a question or better yet the ever present sneer of disgust. It's called communication skills ladies, you have to communicate with the families don't you- so it is possible to have a crazy day/week and still know how to talk to one another.
    Praise!
  7. 0
    Quote from PatMac10,SN
    While I agree that correction should not always be viewed as a personal attack or act of malice, it would be futile to say that the correction, and the reception of it, can be heavily influenced by the way it is delivered.

    If someone is tactless in their critique, then, of course, it will more than likely cause more problems than it solves. Now am I saying you must "sugar coat" things, most certainly not, these are adults we're working with, but you can't deliver a message in any kind of manner and expect someone to be receptive. There is a way to say things directly and professionally while causing minimal offense. If

    Now some people can handle a more...... Abrupt approach than others.

    For example: take an experienced individual who may have a background in a strict family or military, when speaking or correcting a lesser experienced person who may have a similar background, they may be able to bring across points a certain way without causing offense.

    Rudeness or brevity is never a requirement for a point to stick. You don't have to be rude to get a point across. There is a difference between assertiveness and aggression.

    Training a less experienced one calls for respect, open-mindless, tact, and tolerance from both the learner and the teacher. Tolerance is a key because we are always going to be surrounded by people, whether we are the experienced individual or inexperienced one, who make us want to "reach out and touch them", but in most cases we can't do that without causing more problems.......and losing our jobs. Lol.

    Some people will take offense no matter what you say or how you say it.
    Well said!!!!
  8. 2
    Very well said, PatMac.

    I agree that it is tiring to have to feel impeded or inconvenienced by the preceptor role.

    But it is equally tiring for an orientee to have to continually bear the projection of your discontent.
    lovelylady3 and milfordmom like this.
  9. 3
    Quote from milfordmom
    It's called communication skills ladies
    And gentlemen?
    Altra, anotherone, and poppycat like this.
  10. 4
    so many get so defensive or whiny or feel disrespected at any correction or anyone pointing out their errors. even in a nice "just so you know" with a smile approach. i have seen it many times. which is why many nurses wont tell you, will gladly enjoy the arrival of the md to chew you out, the one who makes the hospital millions, and will let your manager know you are incompetent and the cno. or will just fill out incident reports or email the manager every error you do. meanwhile you have no clue what you are doing wrong . i dunno where some of you worked prior to nursing.... i am only in my mid 20s and have seen this in every job, every area of life, everywhere people are catty , "rude" etc.... maybe it is having grown up in a major northeast city ........
    poppycat, Esme12, Altra, and 1 other like this.


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