My first few days, as a new RN - page 2

Here I am, it has been 6 days, since I have been off of orienation, I am disgusted. I took boards yesterday, keeping fingers crossed, but actually I'm a little worried about having the RN title,... Read More

  1. by   Curious1alwys
    This thread makes me not want to wake up tomorrow to go to clinical.:uhoh21:

    I am starting to see how it is going to be. And I am sad it took me so long to see it. AND I know don't have a clue until I start working, which makes me even more sad. What was I thinking?

    I guess the light at the end of the tunnel is there are other jobs out there for nurses OTHER than bedside nursing??

    So depressing.
  2. by   Epona
    Wow. All this is terrible and makes me wonder if I want to be a nurse. This post has certainly opened my eyes. I am supposed to start nursing school in Jan.

    I know it may be difficult to find, but I hear that there are many opportunities in nursing. Why not try a docs. office? Get invovoled with research?? Be an educator?? Being a floor nurse is not the end all. I for one, am not planning on working in a hospital when I get out of nursing school. I may start there to get my feet a little wet, but I will not stay. I have already determined this. My hat goes off to those who do it, but I do not see myself here. I have heard it's difficult to find jobs out of hospitals, but I am sure they are there. You have to look very hard. I am prepared to do that.

    Hope things get better for you and you find your niche!! Hang in there!! Epona
  3. by   ZootRN
    Quote from Epona
    Wow. All this is terrible and makes me wonder if I want to be a nurse. This post has certainly opened my eyes. I am supposed to start nursing school in Jan.

    I know it may be difficult to find, but I hear that there are many opportunities in nursing. Why not try a docs. office? Get invovoled with research?? Be an educator?? Being a floor nurse is not the end all. I for one, am not planning on working in a hospital when I get out of nursing school. I may start there to get my feet a little wet, but I will not stay. I have already determined this. My hat goes off to those who do it, but I do not see myself here. I have heard it's difficult to find jobs out of hospitals, but I am sure they are there. You have to look very hard. I am prepared to do that.

    Hope things get better for you and you find your niche!! Hang in there!! Epona
    Because most appealing jobs in nursing are not given to people fresh out of school. I myself plan to finish my first year and try to get out of this crazy hospital nursing. I am so stressed at work, I can't sleep betwen shifts, constantly worrying that I made a mistake or another nasty family member complained to manager about me not bringing him cofee in time. I tried refuse pt assignment once, when I was floated to unfamiliar floor. Guess what - another nurses had to pick up the patients I refused, and it did not improved my day with everyone hating me and talking behind my back that I made them to work harder.
  4. by   Epona
    Sounds like a mad house.
  5. by   rnmi2004
    That is an unreasonable assignment for an experienced nurse, let alone a new grad. I'm wondering why you're even off orientation if you just took your boards yesterday. It sounds like this place isn't very nures friendly.
  6. by   CityKat
    YIKES!! That is outright FRIGHTENING. I know that I am the type of person to stand my ground when it comes to safety with myself, others and especially patients. Will I lose my job if I say I don't think it is safe to take another patient, etc? Why aren't the nurses standing up for themselves? How can "we", the new grads coming into the profession take a stand and have our voices heard? How can "we" work to change this? There HAS to be a way. Whenever there is a small will, there is always a chance for change. I guess more and more nurses need to really start advocating for themselves instead of the patient alone. Someone told me yesterday that I should be careful because if I advocate in the wrong voice, I might lose my license. How is this possible if it is in reference to safety and it is done in a diplomatic way? I just found out the nurses union isn't very strong here in NYC. Sad. I want to work somewhere with a strong union behind me because of exactly what you have experienced.
    Anyhow..
    I just wouldn't take 9 patients. If I was forced, I would leave and find another job. Maybe I am being to extreme, but nothing scares me more than making a mistake and killing someone
    I hope you figure things out and find better working conditions.
  7. by   jenni82104
    Guess what - another nurses had to pick up the patients I refused, and it did not improved my day with everyone hating me and talking behind my back that I made them to work harder.

    But this is the thing that drives me crazy. YOU did not make this nurse work harder. SHE CHOOSE to take on extra work she could not handle because she chooses not to be assertive and set boundries. She could have refused just like you did. I believe this is what CrunchRn is saying about sticking together.
  8. by   CrunchRN
    Exactly!
  9. by   socishan
    As a nursing student not yet working as a nurse, I can't give you advice from that angle, but I CAN tell you about an experience I had in my former life in corporate America. In my former company, I worked as a statistician and took on as many as 11 projects at one time while my co-workers working in my same product area may have had about 5 or less projects. Do you know why I found myself stuck with that many projects, unable to sleep or take lunch breaks, working from home into the late hours of the night? Because I didn't stick up for myself. Because I was a pushover. Simple as that. My co-workers stuck up for themselves and ended up with half the workload as mine because they spoke up for themselves. Unfortunately, this happens everywhere, not just with nursing. However, with being THAT overloaded in a nursing role, you are putting people's lives at stake whereas in other professions that probably isn't the case. Stick up for yourself now and make it a common practice. The other replies here are correct-- there are ways to do it professionally and respectfully. But you should take action soon or else you might become the pushover who gets all the patients dumped on all the time.
  10. by   slu_rn
    Being assertive, yes, is a good thing I think, but what I always get hung up on is who then will pick up that patient who needs care? It's wonderful for us to talk about how we all should just say no, but then what happens to that person who needs the help and no nurse will take them? I work in a Level III NICU, and while we dont' have anywhere close to 9 patients, 2-3 can get insane. My first day out of orientation (a 12 week orientation, which I really appreciated) I received a new admit. The one thing our educator told us is that in the first few weeks off of orientation, we wouldn't get a new admit. We blew that out of the water on day 1. I did, however, get 5 min to run and eat my sandwich and chips while the charge nurse did my 12p assessments and feedings so I wouldn't pass out. I do realize that I'm lucky in that respect. Now having said all of that. If I could go to college again, would I choose nursing? ABSOLUTELY NOT.
  11. by   jenni82104
    So, do nurses typically get fired for refusing unsafe assignments? For taking a lunch, or for using the restroom too much? I know these sound like ridiculas questions, but it seems like many people complain about these things and put up with being treated badly that I just have to think that hospitals must fire nurses who demand better working conditions, and keep the ones that will take their crap. I only ask because it is my goal to work in a hospital, and I already know that I will not tolerate being treated poorly. If becoming a nurse means that I have to be abused to keep a job then I think I should spend my time and money on a different degree.
  12. by   jenni82104
    Slu06, can't they call someone in? Or is that not a realstic option?
  13. by   slu_rn
    The problem is getting someone to come in. Right now we're struggling with out patients. Our acuity is incredibly high, and work can be a very depressing place to be so who wants to exhaust themselves working an extra shift?

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