Meth is destroying communities - page 7

I am originally from a small town in southern West Virginia. I have lived away from the area for about 8 years now, but I continue to go back 3-4 times a year to visit family and friends. I have... Read More

  1. by   RainDreamer
    Quote from RN_N_DA_MAKN
    I agree with your statement to an extent-not my place to judge anyone. However, my problem lies with the fact that these are the very same people that are mugging, robbing, and murdering innocent people to support their "freedom to do what they want to they want to their own bodies."
    I Do have a problem with that!
    I totally agree, but people do stupid and dangerous things when they use alcohol too. But alcohol won't be illegalized any time in my life time, not while the tobacco and alcohol companies make our laws. I'm not saying that illegal drugs should be legalized or alcohol should be illegalized ..... just that it's not always black and white.

    Just this past week I took care of a 27 week meth baby. Sweetest little thing. I just hope for her sake CPS makes sure she doesn't go home with that mom, and if she doesn't then she should be just fine. When they send these kids home with these parents (if you can even call them that), that's when it gets bad and I feel terribly sorry for those kids. There needs to be more in the way of protecting the kids.
    Last edit by RainDreamer on Sep 3, '06
  2. by   mstigerlily
    Quote from mercyteapot
    I've noticed a couple people have mentioned that the meth epidemic began where they live, which is interesting only because we here in Southern CA are also told that it began here! So, clearly there was a groundswell of meth activitiy at the same time in multiple points around the country. Those early participants never even knew what they were getting into, since it always takes society time to catch on to these things.
    I'm in the San Diego area and meth was just HUGE here 20 years ago when I graduated high school. Meth labs everywhere and tweakers everywhere, they restricted pseudoephinephine ages ago...maybe 10 years ago or more. I can't believe it's just now hitting the midwest area.
  3. by   loriannlpn
    Quote from Drifternurse
    You are so very right about the tremendous strain on families! I posted a thread here a few mos. ago about the overwhelming shock at learning that one of our daughters(26 yrs old, mother of 5) was using meth. Her life continues to decline ...as do the lives of her children. She is separated from her husband(our son-in-law who takes care of the kids but does his own share of neglect and has a meth user girlfriend living with him and the kids) and has little contact with the kids because our son-in-law won't allow her to see the kids. Another adult male also lives in the house and there are recent concerns that the youngest granddaughter(3 yrs) is being sexually molested by that adult male. Our calls to the police and CSD have been futile. Despite our emphasis that we are "mandatory reporters of suspected abuse", neither the police nor CSD have pulled the two granddaughters to thoroughly examine them to see if this could be true!!! This drug meth has created: (1) a monster of our daughter, (i.e. a true "user" in every sense of the word to the point where we don't even know her anymore) and (2) victims of the neediest---our grandchildren.


    My thoughts and prayers will be with you. Please keep yourself healthy so you may be there for your family.
    Have a blessed day
  4. by   loriannlpn
    Quote from mstigerlily
    I'm in the San Diego area and meth was just HUGE here 20 years ago when I graduated high school. Meth labs everywhere and tweakers everywhere, they restricted pseudoephinephine ages ago...maybe 10 years ago or more. I can't believe it's just now hitting the midwest area.


    I have never had any contact with meth, I have not had family members or friends ( that I know of) addicted to meth. I can not believe this drug has been around for so long. I have only heard of it in the last 2 to 3 years.
  5. by   Josh L.Ac.
    Quote from mstigerlily
    I'm in the San Diego area and meth was just HUGE here 20 years ago when I graduated high school. Meth labs everywhere and tweakers everywhere, they restricted pseudoephinephine ages ago...maybe 10 years ago or more. I can't believe it's just now hitting the midwest area.

    Actually it hit where I grew up [SE Kansas] around 15 years ago and continued to build. It does seem odd that it took so long to make national headlines. Unfortunately, it doesn't appear likely that all these little rural towns and counties will be able to deal with all of the increased costs that go along with this drug - HAZMAT for cleaning up the meth labs, foster-care / adoption of meth babies, and on...
  6. by   mstigerlily
    Quote from loriannlpn
    I have never had any contact with meth, I have not had family members or friends ( that I know of) addicted to meth. I can not believe this drug has been around for so long. I have only heard of it in the last 2 to 3 years.
    Oh yes, it's been around forever. Maybe it's our proximity to Mexico but I graduated high school in 1986 and it was everywhere. This article is actually almost ten years old but if you start reading toward the bottom of the first page, you'll see meth production used to come from motorcycle gangs but now is controlled mainly by organized crime. Most meth production centers on the west coast as chemicals come through Mexico (just like a lot of other drugs do)

    http://www.friendsofnarconon.org/dru...thamphetamine/

    Meth is OLD news around here and seemed to have kind of peaked and leveled off now. I don't understand what all the hubbub is about now in these rural communities, we've been dealing with this scourge for a long, long time.
    Last edit by mstigerlily on Sep 4, '06
  7. by   Miss Ludie
    Meth has been around since the late 1800s. Japan and Germany used it as a stimulant for their military. Japan stockpiled it and after the war it began on the black market.
    Arouond here it seems that every week or so someone within 20 miles of where I live is busted for a meth lab. There are many small airstrips around here and virtually every week we see SLED or DEA helicopters searching.

    I used to feel safe here in the country.....then we found out our across the street neighbors were mfg. & selling within 40 feet of my front fence.

    We now have to deadbolt lock everything whereas say 20 years ago we felt safe with only a knob lock. My daughter carries a gun (concealed weapon permitted) and I am strongly considering it too.
  8. by   traumaRUs
    Drifternurse - I am so sorry for your sweet little grandbabies. Our son's girlfriend (who doesn't drink or use drugs) is due in November with our first grandchild. At this point, they aren't together because of his increasing drug use and erratic behavior. I will keep you in my prayers.
  9. by   WVUturtle514
    Quote from mstigerlily
    Meth is OLD news around here and seemed to have kind of peaked and leveled off now. I don't understand what all the hubbub is about now in these rural communities, we've been dealing with this scourge for a long, long time.
    Meth is a "hubbub", as you say, in these small communities because it is a new epidemic for us. Many people choose not to live in large cities and metropolitan areas because of many of the negative aspects that goes a long with city life, such as violence, crime and drugs. Many people feel that living in a small community is a safe haven where they can raise their families and children without worrying about what their children are seeing and being exposed to. People in small communities are generally used to a slower, more laid-back pace to life and they enjoy the comraderie of their neighbors and friends. So I'm sorry that meth is OLD news to you, but it's new news to a lot of people and we are taking it very seriously. We don't want our communities to have to deal with this "scourge".
  10. by   loriannlpn
    Quote from WVUturtle514
    Meth is a "hubbub", as you say, in these small communities because it is a new epidemic for us. Many people choose not to live in large cities and metropolitan areas because of many of the negative aspects that goes a long with city life, such as violence, crime and drugs. Many people feel that living in a small community is a safe haven where they can raise their families and children without worrying about what their children are seeing and being exposed to. People in small communities are generally used to a slower, more laid-back pace to life and they enjoy the comraderie of their neighbors and friends. So I'm sorry that meth is OLD news to you, but it's new news to a lot of people and we are taking it very seriously. We don't want our communities to have to deal with this "scourge".

    I agree, I live in southwest Ohio. Not far from Cincinnati, but far enough. Little farther from Columbus, and far enough. There is not many people in the little town I live in who get "busted" for any type of drug. There has been a few Meth Labs found, but, not compared to what I have read about on this post.
    .
  11. by   traumaRUs
    All I can say is be glad if meth hasn't invaded your little communities. I live in a community where the median income is very high. I am also on the volunteer fire dept. We received specialized training a couple of years ago when a local firefighter was killed by a meth explosion.

    I live in a town of less than 3000 people. We are in the cornbelt. Many of us commute the 15 miles to the "big city" (read population 150,000). Meth manufacturing isn't as popular in the cities because of the very harsh smell. However, many folks in the area do use it too.

    Heroin laced with fentanyl is very popular here too at the moment. My son lost a good friend to a heroin OD two years ago.

    I guess the best lesson to take from this is that it can happen in your community, it can even happen in your own family. I was extremely humbled when it happened to my family as we weren't "them." It can be a bitter pill to swallow.

    Take care.
  12. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from traumaRUs
    All I can say is be glad if meth hasn't invaded your little communities. I live in a community where the median income is very high. I am also on the volunteer fire dept. We received specialized training a couple of years ago when a local firefighter was killed by a meth explosion.

    I live in a town of less than 3000 people. We are in the cornbelt. Many of us commute the 15 miles to the "big city" (read population 150,000). Meth manufacturing isn't as popular in the cities because of the very harsh smell. However, many folks in the area do use it too.

    Heroin laced with fentanyl is very popular here too at the moment. My son lost a good friend to a heroin OD two years ago.

    I guess the best lesson to take from this is that it can happen in your community, it can even happen in your own family. I was extremely humbled when it happened to my family as we weren't "them." It can be a bitter pill to swallow.

    Take care.
    I have similar experiences.

    We live in a small rural farming, ranching and logging community in Northern CA. There are about 3000 people in the entire valley. We live 70 miles from the nearest "city". The "rich" people here are retirees from So. Cal or the Bay Area.

    Meth has been here for years. I remember in 1980 being offered meth while I was home for a summer between college semesters.

    You are right - meth manufacturers need lots of space to make the stuff as there are chemical fumes to deal with.

    It doesn't just happen to "low life" folks either . . .

    steph
  13. by   all4schwa
    hubbub, because around here we don't pass by random addicts, homeless people and orphaned children everyday on our way to work. so when we do it's a problem. mostly because if you do see that person, you probably went to high school with that person or his brother, it'll probably be your own good natured brother that attempts to help him out later that same day because of the naitivte to the knowledge that an addict is truly not the same person they used to be. how do you know an addict is lying?
    his/her lips are moving.

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