Medication Aides - page 6

:confused: I am asking this question of you because I have looked for days for my answer and am still empty handed. I need to know where I might find information on medication aides and their... Read More

  1. by   smk1
    i don't recall any of the nurses here stating that cma/cna/etc.. are "lower than dirt". What i do see is that they feel that some facilities are utilizing unlicensed personel in ways they feel are dangerous to the patients and threatens their license (delegation/responsibility). Just because you "wear the same scrubs" doesn't make you a nurse. Janitors, dietary staff and even secretaries wear scrubs at some facilities, yet they are not nurses or even nurses assistants. some nurses Rts, pts, phlebotomists, parmacy techs etc.. all wear white coats, does that make their level of knowledge equal that of a doctor? NO! This isn't a question of who is a better "person", it is a question of who is a safer health care provider due to their education. Also it is absolutely ILLEGAL for a person who is not a nurse to refer to themselves (or allow others to refer them) as a Nurse. Of course the nurses are going to be indignant about this! If a nurse was passing herself off as a doctor that would be illegal as well and you'd better believe the Docs would be angry (even if the nurse is an NP and functions in a very similar role). The bottom line is that only a nurse can and should be called a nurse. Having been a health assistant myself (now a prenursing student) i personally can't understand why assistants need to give meds, when assistants take care of most of the time consuming personal care, instead of more highly skilled nursing duties, the nurses have more time to do these tasks and assess and evaluate their patients which inmo is the better use of the nurses time.
  2. by   KacyLynnRN
    Quote from Yancy SPN
    We all wear the same kind of scrubs and basically do the same thing as a LPN.
    Excuse me, but as an LPN I feel that I DO need to respond to this comment! I'm sorry, Yancy, but weeks of training does not equal my year and a half of LPN school, my licensure exam to become an LPN, and the experience I have as an LPN. I am not going to get into what I do vs. what you do, the list is too long...what counts is that a person who has gone through a training program where you get a certificate just can not compare themselves to someone who is a competent, licensed nurse. There is a BIG difference, and you will not realize that difference until you go through LPN or RN school and get your license yourself. Only then will you see how much education we really have, and how it is not about knowing how to do something, but is what you're doing appropriate for that patient, and what will the outcome be? I am not trying to put you down, I was a CNA myself for 3 years before becoming an LPN. All I am saying is, to compare a CMA and an LPN is like apples to oranges. And you really won't see the difference until you get through nursing school and NCLEX yourself. I know because I didn't, but you can bet I do now.
    Kacy
  3. by   schroeders_piano
    Quote from Yancy SPN
    CNA'S ARE NOT CONSIDERED NURSES WHERE I'M FROM. WE DO ALL THE "DIRTY" WORK FOR YOU NURSES BECAUSE YOUR A LITTLE TOO AFRAID OF GETTING YOUR HANDS DIRTY!!!!!!!
    I am an RN who has absolutely no problems with getting my hands dirty and I know several other nurses who would not be afraid to get their hands dirty either. I have worked on a Med/Surg unit that didn't utilize CNAs and many times I found myself doing everything for everyone of my patients (many times I had 10 or more patients) including the "dirty" work. So please do not make broad general statements that are not true.
    Last edit by schroeders_piano on Jul 25, '04
  4. by   txspadequeenRN
    You have lost your mind!!!! And you do not do the same thing as a LVN/LPN, I dont care what state you are from. No one here is saying your not qualified in your job aspect or putting you down for having the title you do . However you need a reality check you dont do the intense charting that nurses have to do , and if your doing sterile dressing changes your nurses are either dumb or your lying. Plus you do not carry the responsiblility that a nurse has. And what makes you think CMA's dont steal narcotics or make fatal med errors. Remember it us NURSES who fix your screw up's and One med error in 4 years that is BS. What is your hang-up here, what makes you so defensive? If I were you I would shut my PIE HOLE and start learning from the people in here instead of fighting with them.





    Quote from Yancy SPN
    hello everyone. Medication Aide from Kansas, and let me tell you something about Medication Aides. I am very PROUD to be a CMA. I don't really care what others may think of CMA's because I'm really no different than anyone else in this forum. We all wear the same kind of scrubs and basically do the same thing as a LPN. Only I don't give injections. I have worked in Hospitals as a CNA11 and have done several cath placements, sterile and non sterile dressing changes, and hey, what do I care if you think that I'm not qualified to this kind of job. I believe in myself and I do my job just as well as any of you "NURSES" out there. You want to get defensive and say how Med Aides make med errors all the time, well hey, what about you Nurses out there making the fatal med errors, stealing narcs and whatnot. I'm just as human as you. Everyone makes mistakes, but hey, I geuss your PERFECT!!!! You obviously dont make any mistakes like us LOWER THAN DIRT PEOPLE WHO PASS MEDS AS A CMA. I'm very thankful the good Lord gave me the opportunity to learn and to advance my knowledge and my skills. I'm currently in Nursing School, and its helped me alot with knowing all the meds and what side effects there are and what can happen. i've been a med aid for 4 years now, and have had only 1 med error in those 4 years. How many med errors have you made as a nurse in your whole career?
  5. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Legal secretaries should not go to court- that's a lawyers job.

    Security guards should not try to arrest criminals- that's a cops' job.

    Nurses should not try and perform surgery- that's a surgeon's job-

    CNAs should not pass meds or do sterile procedures-
    That's a NURSE'S job.
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Jul 26, '04
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Editing my reply. Some of the posts on here are so bad, they speak for themselves. No reason for me to ad anything else.
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Jul 26, '04
  7. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from Yancy SPN
    CNA'S ARE NOT CONSIDERED NURSES WHERE I'M FROM. WE DO ALL THE "DIRTY" WORK FOR YOU NURSES BECAUSE YOUR A LITTLE TOO AFRAID OF GETTING YOUR HANDS DIRTY!!!!!!!
    Well, you're right on one point- CNAs are not considered nurses. Because they are not nurses!

    I have worked on all nurse units, which do not use CNAs, and I much prefer that.
  8. by   Rn2b204
    I see there is still debating going on whether a CNA or CMA is a nurse or not. Why are y'all beating a dead horse that topic was about Medication aides passing medicine nothing to do if that person is a nurse or not we all know they are not, they know they are not. So why the constant reminder they are still going to be passing medications, with the same scurbs nurses wear and the patient is still going to be mistaking them for nurses........so why bother???

    Talk about the legality of the medicine aide passing meds because that is what you all are saying is a nursing duty. But CMA are being employed to do this duty. So something has to be legal about it.

    If you are worried about your license while at work make sure the CMA is doing the job right or tell them not to pass meds to your patients. I'm sure they won't mind a lesser load.

    Or better yet find out if your state is violating a law with this practice and do something about it.

    Rn2be204
  9. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Rn2b204
    I see there is still debating going on whether a CNA or CMA is a nurse or not. Why are y'all beating a dead horse that topic was about Medication aides passing medicine nothing to do if that person is a nurse or not we all know they are not, they know they are not. So why the constant reminder they are still going to be passing medications, with the same scurbs nurses wear and the patient is still going to be mistaking them for nurses........so why bother???

    Talk about the legality of the medicine aide passing meds because that is what you all are saying is a nursing duty. But CMA are being employed to do this duty. So something has to be legal about it.

    If you are worried about your license while at work make sure the CMA is doing the job right or tell them not to pass meds to your patients. I'm sure they won't mind a lesser load.

    Or better yet find out if your state is violating a law with this practice and do something about it.

    Rn2be204
    Legal doesn't necessarily equal safe - people who come up with legislation are so out of touch with the reality nurses deal with, they have no idea the consequences of their decisions.

    Do you think a nurse that asked the med aide not to pass meds for his/her patients would get a lighter patient load? I would think not. Talk about no good deed going unpunished - the nurse would get increased workload for being concerned about the safety of the patients.
  10. by   GPatty
    NOw, where I work we have a QMA that is worth her weight in gold. She is more knowledgeable than a book when it comes to drugs, actions and interactions and everything. She passes meds on 3 halls, to 56 patients on 2nd shift and everyone gets all the meds, eye drops, ear drops and everything they are supposed to.

    Now, on the other hand,we also had a lady who missed meds, gave patients the wrong meds, gave wrong doses....heck, this gal even put meds in a patients mouth who had passed away! Ummm, yea.....she isn't passing meds anymore.
  11. by   ERNurse752
    Ah, here it is. I didn't know what you were talking about in your PM to me, because I posted this about two years ago.

    I guess the GED thing sounded bad now that I see it in print. I was thinking of my own cousin in particular, not trying to make a generalization. The general gist being that someone without a college degree in nursing should not be passing meds.


    Quote from KacyLynnLPN
    Excuse me...what does graduating from high school have to do with being a nurse?? I did not graduate high school, I got a GED, went to LPN school, am now an LPN, and am currently in an LPN to RN program. Just because I didn't graduate high school does not make me any less worthy of being a nurse, as you seem to insinuate! :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire
  12. by   Yancy SPN
    This message is for ayndim..... I'm being deffensive because of some of the threads that I read from nurses that really know how to run down a med aide. I'm sorry that everyone feels like they do, and beleive me, if you had med aides working with you, you would see that we are valuable people. I don't read lab values or call the doctors. The nurse I work under has to do that. Here in the state Of Kansas, med aides arent allowed to do things like that and I'm always catching a mistake that the nurse makes when writing the orders in the MAR.If I have concerns regarding a patient or resident, I take it to the nurse and then we get together and figure out what the problem is. Teamwork....is essential to every job.I am in LPN school right now, and being a med aid has helped me out alot like I said. I've always known about side effects and whatnot concerning medications and I have a few drug books to look up meds that I've never heard about and if I have any doubt in my mind about giving a certain medication, I contact my nurse. I dont just give the medication. I dont do IV meds, blood products, insulin and things like that because that is a nurses job to do that. Those areas I'm not trained in. Even when I graduate from LPN school, I still wont be able to administer Blood products, certain Cardiac meds or even start an IV. I'm sorry if I do seem so deffensive, but I value my job as a med aid and I enjoy it very much and like I said, It gives me more knowledge about what I'm doing. I'm not just some flunky med aid that doesnt know anything.
  13. by   GLORIAmunchkin72
    Quote from jcardwell
    I know in Oregon, you can get a Med Aide certification after you have worked as a full time CNA for 6 months. Then you go back to school and take 40 hours of class time and 40 hours of clinicals. Not sure if you have to pass a board exam like with the CNA certificate.

    You might try your CNA schools to see if they know any information.

    Jill
    Here in Indiana you have to pass a state test before you become a qualified medication aides. And yes they are everywhere in the nursing homes and they are a big help to the nurses. They are not, howeve, allowed to give any kind of injections or do any invasive procedures.

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