Medication administer through the colostomy?

  1. 0 Can medication be administered via the colostomy? Pt had rectal Ca. & is not swallowing. Thanks for you information in advance.
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  3. Visit  Hopice} profile page

    About Hopice

    56 Years Old; Joined Mar '08; Posts: 2.

    26 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  jessiern} profile page
    0
    I personally have never heard of that, and I can't think of any benifits that would be gained from it. Are you talking about any medications that would be taken by mouth? If that is what you mean, that no. If they patient is not taking anything orally, they may be a canidate for a peg tube.
  5. Visit  nrsang97} profile page
    0
    I have heard of enemas through the colostomy. Otherwise no. What about placing a NGT?
    Last edit by nrsang97 on Mar 4, '08 : Reason: added
  6. Visit  XB9S} profile page
    0
    Hi Hopice, welcome to the site.

    We do give some suppositories via the stoma.
  7. Visit  BlueRidgeHomeRN} profile page
    1
    Quote from xb9s
    we do give some suppositories via the stoma.
    common enough in hospice, where things like peg tubes aren't appropriate. the absorption rate is about the same as rectal, unless its an ileostomy.
    XB9S likes this.
  8. Visit  Valanda} profile page
    0
    I used to do this when I worked hospice, but had some trouble with some of the meds not wanting to disolve. The Medical Director for the hospice program obtained a bunch of empty gel caps. We crushed the meds and put them into the empty gel caps, then into the colostomy. No more troubles.
  9. Visit  Hopice} profile page
    0
    In hospice we have pts that are unable to swallow & medication is administer into the rectum. Thanks for the information
  10. Visit  leslie :-D} profile page
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    i have given meds through a colostomy...
    but would be concerned w/absorption, considering pt has rectal ca.

    leslie
  11. Visit  core0} profile page
    0
    Quote from Valanda
    I used to do this when I worked hospice, but had some trouble with some of the meds not wanting to disolve. The Medical Director for the hospice program obtained a bunch of empty gel caps. We crushed the meds and put them into the empty gel caps, then into the colostomy. No more troubles.
    Umm that wouldn't work for most meds. There are quite a few meds that are absorbed rectally but not all. Most likely they would just pass through. To the OP I would ask your pharmacist about absorption.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  12. Visit  leslie :-D} profile page
    2
    Quote from core0
    Umm that wouldn't work for most meds. There are quite a few meds that are absorbed rectally but not all. Most likely they would just pass through.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    i'm quite confident the hospice medical director is extremely qualified as to what meds could be absorbed through the intestinal mucosa.
    a rather audacious statment, don't you think mr. carpenter, pa-c???

    leslie
    BlueRidgeHomeRN and Valanda like this.
  13. Visit  core0} profile page
    4
    Quote from earle58
    i'm quite confident the hospice medical director is extremely qualified as to what meds could be absorbed through the intestinal mucosa.
    a rather audacious statment, don't you think mr. carpenter, pa-c???

    leslie
    If it was small bowel intestinal mucosa I would agree. However, the large intestine has significantly different mucosa then the small bowel. In particular any medication that is protein bound or lipid bound will probably not be absorbed. You see similar effects in patients with short bowel syndrome or have had gastric bypass. These patients have at least some small bowel unlike patients with a colostomy. I can also show you significantly different absorption profiles between a J-tube and G-tube. Again these patients at least have some small bowel mucosa to absorb.

    The other thing that is not stated is where the colostomy is. If it is an ileostomy for example there would be some absorption (but again little or no protein bound absorption). If this is a descending diverting colostomy then this has even less absorption than if it was given rectally. Look at it this way, if you ground up Lithium or Coumadin would you expect these to be absorbed? I would guess that some opiates would be aborbed since these can be given rectally. However I would have no way of knowing how much would be absorbed or how quickly. This is the reason that rectal medication are special preparations. Any other medication would be a complete crapshoot.

    As for a hospice medical director knowing which meds could be absorbed through a colostomy, no I would not expect them to know this. Besides the fact that this is hopefully an unusual situation this is outside their area of expertise. I could ask the GI docs here and while they have probably the greatest knowledge about colonic absorption they would still defer to the pharmacist because the pharmacist has more knowledge about the absorption mechanism of a particular drug, whether it can be crushed and how that would affect the absorption. On the other hand I will defer to palliative care on palliative pain issues since that is their area of expertise.

    This is the exact reason that all transplant programs are required to have dedicated pharmacists as part of their teams. I know to halve the prograf dose when the patient is on Diflucan. However, when I am trying to figure out Zosyn, Vanco, Micafungin, Acyclovir and Prograf dose and how the kinetics interact, I rely on the pharmacist because that is what they do for a living.

    Bottom line is that PO meds are given PO for a reason. Assuming that giving them another route will produce the same effect is unwise in my opinion.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    Last edit by core0 on Mar 6, '08 : Reason: fixed for blueridgehomern
    elkpark, rizzle, Jessy_RN, and 1 other like this.
  14. Visit  emmycRN} profile page
    0
    Quote from earle58
    i'm quite confident the hospice medical director is extremely qualified as to what meds could be absorbed through the intestinal mucosa.
    a rather audacious statment, don't you think mr. carpenter, pa-c???

    leslie
  15. Visit  BlueRidgeHomeRN} profile page
    0
    Quote from core0
    as for a hospital medical director knowing which meds could be absorbed through a colostomy
    the word was hospice, not hospital!


    and almost all palliative meds can be given at any end or opening in the alimentary canal, sir.


    patricia brown, rn, bsn, chpn, ccm,cohc, dhcs


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