LPN's are Nurses Too? Aren't they? - page 6

Hi, This is my first post. I received my letter Monday accepting me into the LPN program at a school 40 miles away. I am sooo excited that I am telling everyone. But, when I tell them it is for... Read More

  1. by   txspadequeenRN
    Thank you!!!!!!




    Quote from Nurse Berta
    I was an LPN for 10 years before I eventually got an ADN, BSN, MSN. I really learned how to be a nurse in LPN training. I was really proud to be an LPN. Eventually, I taught in an LPN program. I chose that over the AD or BSN programs to teach in, because in my heart, I will always be an LPN. Be proud of who you are. Stand up for your profession! YOU ARE A NURSE!
  2. by   opalmRN
    Quote from Autumndove
    What drew me to this site was when we got a test question on what to do when a Physician wants to give an order over the phone and the LPN answered. The possible answers to choose from were a) get the nurse b) tell the physician to call back later c) take the order and repeat the order to verify you have the information down correct. I chose (c) but I'm thinking I got this wrong, since in the text books, it says to get the RN. -Autumn
    In Pennsylvania, LPNs are authorized to take phone orders as are RNs. The difference is whether the facility has implemented this new change or not.
  3. by   jnette
    You BET they are Nurses... and damn GOOD ones, too ! Uh.. it does say Licensed Practical NURSE, does it not?

    So sad.. our facility is now no longer permiltted to hire any more LPNs from here on out. Just PCTs and RNs. What a shame... makes the RNs job all the more difficult, too.
  4. by   missmercy
    yes!!!!!

    Our LPNs are not allowed to take orders from the Docs,or give IV push meds. They can start, maintain and regulate IVs if it's not a major drip or blood products. However, they are ( at least in our facility) intelligent, hard working NURSES and we love having them here!!! RN's have a specific role, LPNs do to -- but we all have licensure and are al nurses!!
  5. by   mattsmom81
    Old thread revisited here, eh?

    The hospital systems around my parts don't know how to manage the two levels of nursing anymore, sadly. They have found it easier recently to do away with LVN's altogether which is even more sad. Honestly the policies in some places I work make it very difficult for me as a RN to work with LVN's as I seldom find in place a practical way available to divide the workload fairly and appropriately.

    When I was a LPN we did team nursing which allowed everybody on the 'team' optimal contribution. Now we do primary care, and if a LVN is on duty it can leave the RN's feeling resentful they have to 'do extra stuff' and assume liabilities LVN's are not permitted by policy. This along with a full load of patients themselves. I've been stuck in this situation and it CAN foster resentment between RN's and LPN's, I believe...the system propogates it IMO.

    So in my mind it goes back to an unresponsive system... again. Just like most of our problems in nursing IMO.

    With the shortage of nurses willing to work in today's facilities, hospitals seem to be shooting themselves in the foot by not providing a workable system made up of both RN's and LVN's. But they never asked me for an opinion, did they?
  6. by   lpn3324
    Quote from Autumndove
    Hi all,

    I agree there is a real lack of information about LPNs and their role in nursing. I'm a first year nursing student for the ADN degree and so far in my nurse 1 & 2 classes, they've yet to talk about LPNs. What drew me to this site was when we got a test question on what to do when a Physician wants to give an order over the phone and the LPN answered. The possible answers to choose from were a) get the nurse b) tell the physician to call back later c) take the order and repeat the order to verify you have the information down correct. I chose (c) but I'm thinking I got this wrong, since in the text books, it says to get the RN.

    My whole confusion on this topic was that I thought LPNs were nurses and I didn't really see anything wrong with them taking an order over the phone as long as it was taken correctly. I was also fustrated to see that in my nursing text book there really wasn't much of a mention about LPNs and their roles and responsibilities.

    -Autumn
    Depending on the facility,LPNs can take verbal orders over the phone. If we had to have an RN all the time at the facilities I work at we would probably have a lot of very sick or dead patients,due to lack of care.So manyb places are administered by RNs but RUN by LPNs. Time to get off my soapbox
  7. by   Mommy/Grandma
    I am 46 years old and changed my profession to nursing I was out of school for a good 15 years. I didn't think I could do the program it was hard but I did and proud of my self. What bothers me is when you tell people that you are an LPN and they ask are you going for your RN you know you really should if not just to prove you can do it. Patients and other RN's say this to me. If I wanted to be an RN I would of went to school to be one. It just really upsets me.
  8. by   Quickbeam
    As much misinformation is out there for RNs, it goes double for LPNs. We all have to educate, every day of our professional lives.

    I do want to add that when I worked as a CNA in the early 1970's, I worked with 2 LPNs who had never had any schooling at all. They called them "LPNs by waiver". They were grandmothered into the licensure system. They were both quite old. I had looked into it because I had a degree already and bedside skills but was told that the waiver program had long ago been stopped. So, the educational question for all stripes of nursing still haunts.
  9. by   EFMBholder
    Do not worry about every one else. My job satisfaction comes when one of my patients takes the time to thank me. As far as everyone else knowing what I do the can take a flying leap
  10. by   Nurse Somebody
    Just Jenn,

    I registered just to reply to your post. I am an LPN Student, finishing in December. I AM a nurse already, as far as I am concerned. Nursing comes from the heart and no piece of paper can make anyone a nurse if they are not. A nurse IS a professional no matter the title, but the license is not what makes you a nurse; it is what you have inside of you that makes you want to go into a sick person's room and clean them up for the eleventh time this shift, to go back and check on your patients one last time before going home, to hold a patients hand and let them tell you about their pet that is surely missing them at home while they are away, and drives you to keep going back everyday for more. I know that some people can't understand how a person can clean up pee and puke all day everyday, but there is so much more than that to nursing, and those who don't get it will never be nurses, and those who do get it will be taking care of them when they get sick and need help. In response to those who question you about why you are just going for your LPN, ask them why they chose to be a jerk when there are so many other things they COULD have been if they had tried. Don't let 'em get you down, girl!
  11. by   Midwest4me
    "We have an inside joke that RN means REAL NURSE and LPN means LITTLE PRETEND NURSE".

    Man, that brought back a memory! During orientation at a psychiatric hospital years ago, I'd been warned ahead of time that "LPNs are treated just like the direct care staff--not like nurses--so be forwarned." Shortly after this, I had a CNA ask: "So what's your role here?" I said "I'm an LPN." He said "Oh, not a real nurse then..." Pissed me off!!! I, in turn, said "Well, last I checked I was a real nurse!" I sure hope we are never "phased out"(that term was used in nsg school nearly 20 yrs ago, telling us we had better not stop at the LPN level!) because as much as I would like the better pay and better job opportunities, I just don't have the energy or finances to go back to school for the RN education.
  12. by   CHATSDALE
    i agree that many people are unaware of the scope of lpns but also many people who do know of that you are limited as to how far you can go,,but mny people are constrained by finances and time needed at home to return to school..
  13. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from Drifternurse
    "We have an inside joke that RN means REAL NURSE and LPN means LITTLE PRETEND NURSE".

    I had a CNA ask: "So what's your role here?" I said "I'm an LPN." He said "Oh, not a real nurse then..." Pissed me off!!! I, in turn, said "Well, last I checked I was a real nurse!" I sure hope we are never "phased out"(that term was used in nsg school nearly 20 yrs ago, telling us we had better not stop at the LPN level!) because as much as I would like the better pay and better job opportunities, I just don't have the energy or finances to go back to school for the RN education.
    Yup I hear ya. I was a LPN who worked her way through RN school, it wasn't easy and not everyone can swing it.

    Sadly there are those BSN proponents who would just as quickly do away with you (and me also as 'just' a diploma RN.) Recognition of the value and contribution of all of us seems lost on these types, and too many delight in elitism and actively propogate it in the workplace.

    I still remember being told as a new grad diploma RN (by snobby BSNs from the local uni) that very soon I would be the only one passing bedpans and she, the educated BSN who was soooo much better than me, would be ordering me to do it. The local BSN program was actively pushing this agenda. (This was 28 yrs ago and it ain't happened yet by the way.

    Don't let the turkeys get ya down...they're out there everywhere it seems.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Sep 30, '04

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