Low rider pants on nurses - page 6

It's becoming a problem in many workplaces according to yesterday's Wall Street Journal: Low rider pants. I'm seeing some nurses wearing them, and they're steadily moving south of propriety in... Read More

  1. by   Empress
    Wait!

    You mean the distance between my bellybutton and waistband will give people the wrong idea about me, that I'm a loose woman, even if they can't see any skin? Oh, no.

    So to be absolutely professional I need to have that waistband smack on my belly button? How many inches can I get away with, 2-3 inches below my belly button before I turn into a harlot?

    With the issues facing nursing today, I think there's a heck of a lot more things needed changed then encouraging sexism and commenting on certain clothing styles that are entirely appropriate as seen by the examples linked to. No one follows male nurses and comments on how their sleeves are too short and that could be sexually suggestive for showing their biceps.
  2. by   happystudent
    Originally posted by Empress
    Wait!

    You mean the distance between my bellybutton and waistband will give people the wrong idea about me, that I'm a loose woman, even if they can't see any skin? Oh, no.

    So to be absolutely professional I need to have that waistband smack on my belly button? How many inches can I get away with, 2-3 inches below my belly button before I turn into a harlot?

    With the issues facing nursing today, I think there's a heck of a lot more things needed changed then encouraging sexism and commenting on certain clothing styles that are entirely appropriate as seen by the examples linked to. No one follows male nurses and comments on how their sleeves are too short and that could be sexually suggestive for showing their biceps.
    Yeah......what she said
  3. by   live4today
    Parents who permitted this type of "dresscode" for their children while the kids were growing up are much to blame for them not knowing how to "professionally dress" while on a job.

    Professionalism is a lifestyle...in my opinion. The way I dress, my personal hygiene, and the way I carry myself says a lot about myself to ME and to those observing me out in the workplace or elsewhere.

    I'm glad I raised my daughters in a generation where the clothes being worn today were NOT in stock. Had they been...my girls would have NEVER...and I mean NEVER worn them.

    I went shopping last weekend with my seven (almost eight) year old granddaughter, and the clothing for sale for little girls is totally disgusting in most of the stores. She wanted a dress and I could NOT find her one that looked decent enough for a little girl to wear. What's up with this fashion designers who might be reading this board?

    What we are witnessing at work with the way younger women are dressing is indicative of the society they grew up in, and the fashions are getting more and more disgusting.

    When I'm walking in the mall, or grocery shopping, or in restaurants, it is totally disgusting to see women and young girls wearing pants that show more of their butts than anything else.
    Especially for the overweight females who think they look good in these fashions.

    These things are NOT meant for the workforce, and I hope hospitals BAN them altogether.

    Don't hate the messenger.......heed the message!
    Last edit by live4today on Jul 28, '03
  4. by   Q.
    Great post, Empress.

    I agree with the majority: low riders and flare legs are fine. My main concern is clothing that is revealing. I personally don't like pants that fit just below my breasts! Way too uncomfortable!

    As far as piercings - if someone's naval piercing can get stuck in an elevator, then by gosh that same warning should be applied to earrings or ponytails!
  5. by   kdo6905
    So what is defined as professional? Times have changed...and we need to incorporate new styles into our image. But is professional defined as a crisp white hat, SAS shoes, a white starched skirt below the knees etc. only or is there more than one professional look? I myself can't wear any premanufactured scrub pants because I'm petite and the crotch always hangs down to my knees. However, I finally found some flared, low rise pants from Dickies. They're great.
  6. by   kdo6905
    I'd also like to say you can wear appropriate scrubs and if you don't have the right shape that can still be appropriate. A girl at work had on these Landeau scrub pants that were ill fitting and she leaned down to pick something up and I saw her crack. It was very unattractive. I think this is more of do you look in the mirror?
  7. by   KayNICUchsd
    This discussion seems to be divided between the generations. To me, it makes perfect sense that the opinions differ according to our ages. You cannot blame us (younger nurses) for incorporating the way we dress outside of work to the way we dress at work. It is all about being comfortable as well as looking professional. Just as the older nurses incorporate their style of dress to the workplace. Maybe it's something that is hard to come to terms with. Can I ask you this one question? Do those who wear the more tapered leg, high-waisted pants to work also wear that same style outside of work? To me, this issue just seems to add to the whole saying of "nurses eat their young". It is just one more thing to look down upon us for. I know that I am a completely compassionate person and became a nurse to serve those in need. I have worked 4 long years to get to where I am today (starting my first job in two weeks!!) and I am hoping that the nurses on my unit are going to care more about the person I am inside rather then the type of attire I am wearing... Aren't there more important things? Of course, I too agree that showing any skin is entirely inappropriate, but flare leg pants is something we have grown up wearing. I cant stand wearing tapered legged and high-waisted pants (which I did for some clinical rotations). I feel completely comfortable wearing my new scrubs and completely appropriate tops. If you were to wear an outfit you were completely uncomfortable in...would you be able to focus on your job? which is what is important here. I am able to understand that professionalism is a key aspect of nursing today. Opinions are going to differ on this subject matter, and believe me, I too, have pondered what is appropriate in the workplace. I'll let you know of the opinions of my co-workers. During my preceptorship, the nurses on the floor (of all ages and sizes) absolutely loved and commented on my scrubs each day I went in, and also on my professionalism. Sorry for the long post, just an issue I felt I needed to add my opinion too!!!
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Attire is only part of the whole person. Whether we like it or not, however, we are judged by our appearances in nursing. That is a fact. I don't like unprofessional images be they long, dagger-like finger nails, loud make-up, stinky perfume, etc. If low-rider pants ARE CLEAN AND NOT REVEALING as in the picture, I have no problem with it. There are worse things bringing down our nursing image---so I have changed my stance a bit on the pants. BUT it's part of the WHOLE PACKAGE....perfectly ironed-scrubs do NOT make up for the gum-popping,perfume-reeking, loud, outlandish makeup, loud-mouthing many nurses display. Never will. It's a whole package-deal. And we need a lot of cleaning up, frankly.
  9. by   live4today
    Originally posted by Celiabs
    What do you think about Capri pants? They always make me think of those 50s beach movies with Annette and Frankie.

    Here's the kind of drop waist I was referring to:
    http://www.ackley-uniforms.com/landau_flare.htm
    These pants appear to be fine from the picture AS LONG AS a shirt is TUCKED IN the pants like in the picture. No belly buttons should show of course.
  10. by   fab4fan
    I am sick to death of this "nurses eat their young" crap...every time someone differs with a newer nurse it is immediately construed into "eating our young."

    Perhaps the pants shown in the ad weren't bad, but it won't be long until someone pushes the limits a little further. At some point there needs to be a line in the sand, a limit to what is appropriate in the work place.

    And I hate the gum popping, perfume reeking, gaudy makeup wearing image, too. Instead of always thinking of what YOU want, think about the pt for a change.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    We had a nurse last year wearing the capri style pants and she dropped a suction canister and it splashed, sending gastric acid all over her legs.

    Right after that, capri pants were banned from our hospital.

    As for the all white uniform idea, white pants or skirts, I wouldn't want. For one i'd manage to sit in something, because that's Murphy's Law on white pants, wear them and you always get some sort of spot on the butt.

    Plus there is just a certain time of the month where white is just the LAST thing i want to WEAR lol.
  12. by   KayNICUchsd
    I personally have yet to meet a nurse who treated me with the "nurses eat their young" mentality. Actually, the first time I heard the phrase was from a director of nursing that indeed said that there is such a thing. I dont want to believe it, and I'm sorry if I offended anyone with mentioning it. Just an opinion.
  13. by   iliel
    Originally posted by ainz
    With the issues facing nursing today, the last thing we need is something that erodes credibility or professionalism.

    Sexually suggestive clothing is inappropriate in the workplace in any healthcare profession, setting, whether it is being worn by male, female, or anything in between.

    I am a male, men perceive low-rider pants on women as sexually suggestive, nursing is over 94% female, it is inappropriate . . . period.
    Just wondering if you looked at the scrubs pants in question. They are hardly the low riders that I wear to a club.
    I hate the fact that the crotch on scrub pants comes down to my knees!

    Empress, well said!

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