leaving after 6 months...feeling GUILTY! HELP!

  1. Hello,

    I'm a new grad and have been working a night position for 6 months. I was just hired at another facility in L&D and will be working evenings instead of al night. Two problems:
    1) I feel so guilty that I am leaving my current position after on ly 6 months. The floor is so understaffed and everyone is so nice.

    2) I will be getting paid less and I'm nervous that I will change and then realize that L&D isn't what I thought it was.

    Also, I don't know how to going about giving my 2 weeks notice.:uhoh21:
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    Well, you've already made your decision. It's a free country and you're a grown up. Now you just have to follow through.

    Two week's notice: You put it in writing. You give it to the manager, preferably in person. "As of X/x/06, my employment will cease as I have found a position elsewhere". Some people add a nice note so as not to burn bridges "I've enjoyed my employment here, I've learned a lot....blah blah blah....but that's not necessary.


    If they like your work and they are short staffed, the manager may try to keep you and lay a guilt trip on you. Do what you need to do for yourself and your goals without guilt.

    Most nursing positions are never what we think they will be. Most nursing positions are stressful, including L&D. However, you'd be very angry without yourself if you didn't find out.

    Good luck!
    Last edit by Tweety on Sep 1, '06
  4. by   Elisheva
    Licensed personnel were required to give a month's notice at our facility. I didn't find that out until I gave mine. You might want to check it out.

    Good luck in your new position.
  5. by   mtngrl
    Quote from circusgirl
    Hello,

    I'm a new grad and have been working a night position for 6 months. I was just hired at another facility in L&D and will be working evenings instead of al night. Two problems:
    1) I feel so guilty that I am leaving my current position after on ly 6 months. The floor is so understaffed and everyone is so nice.

    2) I will be getting paid less and I'm nervous that I will change and then realize that L&D isn't what I thought it was.

    Also, I don't know how to going about giving my 2 weeks notice.:uhoh21:
    I am just curious...you have already been hired at this new place.... so did they not check with your current employer as a reference? So wouldn't they already have an idea you are leaving?

    Most people feel somewhat guilty when they resign. But we all to remember...we need to do what's the best thing for us. You shouldn't stay in a job to be nice. They will understand that you want to take a different path.
  6. by   lannisz
    If I was your coworker, I would definitely understand....I would absolutely love evening shift (we only have day or night 12's) because those are the best hours for me personally. Also, L&D is where I've always wanted to be too, and I start a new position there (nights) in 2 weeks myself. I understand about the guilt, the position I left had a great staff too. Most of my colleagues have been understanding about me wanting to leave to do L&D. They are sad I'm leaving, but happy for me going to L&D. Change is always scary, even when it's a positive one.
  7. by   BabyRN2Be
    Quote from Tweety

    Most nursing positions are never what we think they will be. Most nursing positions are stressful, including L&D. However, you'd be very angry without yourself if you didn't find out.

    Good luck!
    No truer words have been spoken regarding nursing. I'm learning this as a pre-nursing student and I'm so glad for the experience.

    Best of luck to you, I hope you find your niche in nursing!
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from mtngrl
    I am just curious...you have already been hired at this new place.... so did they not check with your current employer as a reference? So wouldn't they already have an idea you are leaving?

    Employers understand that people look for jobs without notifying their current employer because that could be akward. Most applications have a spot "may be contact your currernt employer" or something like that. You can definately specify not to use your current employer as a reference.
  9. by   catlady
    Quote from mtngrl
    I am just curious...you have already been hired at this new place.... so did they not check with your current employer as a reference? So wouldn't they already have an idea you are leaving?
    They probably called Human Resources, which doesn't mean the OP's manager would know anything about it.
  10. by   neetnik461
    Is the new facility you where hired at, a part of the healthcare system you now work for? If so, you may be in the midst of an intrasystem transfer. I'm a new grad who has taken a position at another hospital-owned facility after 10 months at my current job. I've come to find out that the nurse manager can hold a transferring employee up to 6 weeks if staffing requires it (I am being held 4 weeks before I can start my new position). Also, our policy requires a "release" from the current position by the nurse manager for new grads who have been in that position for less than a year.

    So, if you are going to be working for the same system but at a different location, find out from the HR at the new facility what the protocol for transferring is. Otherwise, if your new job is with a different healthcare system then just go in and give your two weeks notice.

    I too felt guilty and nervous about leaving before having at least a year under my belt at the current job. Staffing is tight and I was provided with a 6 month orientation at this position. My NM was dissapointed, but understanding and didn't give me a hard time about the transfer.

    When giving your notice, start by being very positive about your current position, express what you like about it and that it has been a great learning experience etc . . . Then go into the details . . .that your desire has always been to do L & D . . .an opportunity has come up . . .etc. My advice is to make it very short and sweet, just the facts ma'am! Don't get into details about feeling guilty or about staffing issues etc.

    Go into L & D with a positive attitude, remembering that one advantage to being a nurse is the flexibility to explore different areas of practice (if necessary) until you find your niche!

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