JCAHO survey

  1. okay guys, we've all been through it before....JCAHO is here at my hospital this week...fun fun fun. Anyway, why is it the administration waits until a month or so before they are scheduled to come to try to cram all this new "stuff" down your throats? It is also at this time they decide to change around policies or do away with some.
    Our hospital depends on a good JCAHO survey due to our high influx of medicaid/medicare patients...to change around a bunch of things and produce new things seems counter-productive to me. They should do this in the interim. Don't you think?
    We had DFS come see us this past year also due to a patient complaint. So JCAHO will be definately hunting for things! Know what I mean?
    What do you guys go through when they come? What do your facilities do to help you out or make it worse?

    I personally can't wait until they are GONE!!!!!
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   P_RN
    You really don't want to know what *I* think of JCAHO. It's a farce. Prior warning is ludicrous. It's like cleaning house before the housekeeper gets there.

    I found the best answer is "I don't have that information, but I know where to find it."
  4. by   kitty=^..^=cat
    JCAHO isn't perfect, but what agency is? Right now their process is the best way to assure that care is as consistent as possible throughout the country and that dangerous practices are eliminated. While I agree with the mission of the JCAHO and understand the rationale for most of their standards, I have problems with the subjectivity of the survey process. I went to a JCAHO conference last month, and part of the program included discussion about how surveys will be conducted in the future. A lot of it makes sense and will tighten interpretation into a more objective measurement. There will also be a lot more patient-oriented focus, or so they say...

    My hospital really tries to stay current with JCAHO standards to decrease the hurry-scurry stuff just before survey, but it's hard. Getting ready for JCAHO's every-third-year visit reminds me of family reunions in a way... My family has an annual reunion that rotates from home to home, and about every four years my mother, sister and I end up hostessing here in the town where we've all settled. We try to stay "on top of things", but in the last few weeks before aunts and uncles and cousins start arriving, we're cleaning out closets and re-organizing the pantries and driving the demon dust-bunnies from the guest rooms and hiding things and "establishing new policy" with our husbands. It's chaos -- just like the weeks before JCAHO arrives.

    ...and just like JCAHO, we're exhausted, glad to see them leave and professing that we'll be ready next time!!!
  5. by   MelRN13
    We had new policies and procedures shoved down our throats for a MONTH before the surveyors came! The supervisors also did a folder of "commonly" asked questions.

    Thankfully I was not approached by any of the surveyors, but we were taught if you don't know the answer to a question, politely tell them "I do not know the answer to that, but I can help you find out the information you need."
  6. by   webbiedebbie
    Our hospital found out it was using an old outdated approved abbreviation list. Had a few other minor infractions. But we made it through.
  7. by   esselmulen
    In my 13 years on the same floor, I've never run into a JACHO. I don't know what one looks like but I bet if I saw one I'd know. They must be large, stone faced, fearsome creatures, created by some diabolicly insane bureaucrat for the sole purpose of harassing hard working nurses and causing panic in management types. Hmmm. maybe my attitude toward them is the reason that I'm always scheduled off when they come to our facility.
  8. by   altomga
    way too funny...:roll :chuckle
  9. by   911fltrn
    Inspections should definately be unanounced!
  10. by   zudy
    JCOH is a joke. I always wonder how much those people make. The last "inspecter" we had did nothing but talk about himself for 45 minutes, I swear the man did not draw a breath, then said,"Do you know where your mercury sponge is?" then left. In the orthopedic clinic he talked for 1 hour about how bad his knees were, how much they hurt,etc , then left. We could have been shooting up and stuffing dead bodies on the linen cart for all this guy would have noticed.

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