Is there any nursing job that'll make $30,000+/yr for the FIRST job? - page 4

Guys, it seems like computer jobs are going to be outsourced... (from what people have said to me...) and i wanted a job into computers... but now i dont want to. anyways, i was wondering what kind... Read More

  1. by   Tweety
    Quote from catlady
    Ten years ago when nurses were being laid off and otherwise generally abused, I remember a lot of nurses who were going to give up nursing to become computer techs and programmers. That's certainly come full circle now, hasn't it?

    Interesting isn't it? And why do you think these people chose IT after being laid off during a nursing glut?......................job availability and the opportunity to make a good salary. Why do we as nurses look down on others for considering this when they are considering nurses?

    As I've said in other posts, there are other qualities I like to see in nurses such as personality, compassion, blah blah blah, but I certainly understand that making a living wage and having job opportunities is part of a person's consideration of this career.
  2. by   Tweety
    Quote from RNsRWe
    It wasn't that he was "just asking". It was WHAT he was asking and WHY. His reasoning for finding a job in nursing had zero to do with any expressed desire to work in that field, only the need to wipe out student loans. It's somewhat insulting to those who busted their butts to become nurses, to be viewed as a lesser major and merely a paycheck. I suppose it makes it more obvious a fact that the general public has no clue what the heck nurses do--we're just paid well and anyone can do it.

    So no, I don't see this as someone who is intelligently exploring career options. He's looking for the easy way out to make cash when he's under pressure to do so. And it offends many of our sensibilities.

    Maybe I'll see if Bill Gates needs a new CEO for one of his companies. I hear they pay well.
    Obviously if he's worried that nurses don't even make $30k a year he doesn't he isn't looking for a well-paid job. And we don't know what other processes are involved in his decision, as this post is merely a question about money.

    I do appreciate your sentiments though and allow you your opinion, because it's a good and valid point.

    However, talking about the OP like this is borderlining on a TOS violation and we should stop now and speak more generically. OK?

    Generically speaking, people who are only looking for a paycheck don't make good nurses. In my opinion nursing school weeds a lot of these folks out.
    Last edit by Tweety on Aug 13, '06
  3. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from Tweety
    Interesting isn't it? And why do you think these people chose IT after being laid off during a nursing glut?......................job availability and the opportunity to make a good salary. Why do we as nurses look down on others for considering this when they are considering nurses?

    As I've said in other posts, there are other qualities I like to see in nurses such as personality, compassion, blah blah blah, but I certainly understand that making a living wage and having job opportunities is part of a person's consideration of this career.
    Exactly Tweety - let these folks spout "Higher calling" all they want, but you can BET the minute somebody cut their wages in half, they'd be looking for something NOT nursing!
  4. by   nursemike
    Quote from Tweety
    Obviously if he's worried that nurses don't even make $30k a year he doesn't he isn't looking for a well-paid job. And we don't know what other processes are involved in his decision, as this post is merely a question about money.

    I do appreciate your sentiments though and allow you your opinion, because it's a good and valid point.

    However, talking about the OP like this is borderlining on a TOS violation and we should stop now and speak more generically. OK?

    Generically speaking, people who are only looking for a paycheck don't make good nurses. In my opinion nursing school weeds a lot of these folks out.
    I wrote on my application to nursing school that "my interest in nursing is primarily vocational. It seems like a meaningful job that I could do well, and do well for myself..."

    By the middle of my second semester, I was convinced that God intended for me to be a nurse. (Boy, that God--sure has a wry sense of humor, at times!)

    I've advised a couple of friends to try nursing, and precious little of my advice was angel-of-mercy crap. Of course you need compassion and stuff. You also need the ability to maintain a degree of objectivity. Most people I know have plenty of innate altruism, but many might not be able to balance that with the required detachment.

    I hope the OP will take the advice he can use and decide what's best for him. As you say, not many dilettantes will make it through nursing school, but on other hand, martyrs, by definition, die before their time.
  5. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from Tweety
    I do appreciate your sentiments though and allow you your opinion, because it's a good and valid point.

    However, talking about the OP like this is borderlining on a TOS violation and we should stop now and speak more generically. OK?

    Generically speaking, people who are only looking for a paycheck don't make good nurses. In my opinion nursing school weeds a lot of these folks out.
    Ok, then, generically speaking, in answering a hypothetical question about this subject, one in which a real person is NOT asking such a question, I still agree. Thus, my standing by my opinion that nursing would not be a miserable vocation for such a person, because that person would not be expected to survive the nursing curriculum.

    My school program definitely did a slash job on many students the instructors felt would not make good nurses. They weeded out those who were poor academically, or had poor clinical skills, or, sometimes, it seemed they just honed in on those who they felt would not be the patient's best advocate but rather, only their own.

    Some people felt that having those students dismissed was unfair, that they hadn't gotten enough chances to prove themselves or whatever. The reality is, after so many years in nursing, the instructors should be given some credit for having a clue what might be needed in a good nurse. Some people think judging subjectively should not be allowed, but I disagree. A student who does well academically and can perform in skill evaluations competently may just be *wrong* in subtle ways when it comes to bedside manner, patient care, interactions with other staff and team members. It's not a black / white thing, is it? There's that gray area that you either have or you don't.
  6. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from gauge14iv
    Exactly Tweety - let these folks spout "Higher calling" all they want, but you can BET the minute somebody cut their wages in half, they'd be looking for something NOT nursing!
    LOL! I remember this debate waging large on a thread somewhere, and someone was asked if she'd do this job WITHOUT good pay, and she responded 'yes', she'd do it for free! ROFL....imagine that! Then again, this was a student
  7. by   Tweety
    Quote from RNsRWe
    It's not a black / white thing, is it? There's that gray area that you either have or you don't.

    Yes. I agree with you on this.
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from nursemike
    By the middle of my second semester, I was convinced that God intended for me to be a nurse. (Boy, that God--sure has a wry sense of humor, at times!)

    I've advised a couple of friends to try nursing, and precious little of my advice was angel-of-mercy crap. Of course you need compassion and stuff. You also need the ability to maintain a degree of objectivity. Most people I know have plenty of innate altruism, but many might not be able to balance that with the required detachment.

    I was a devout Christian at the time I started nursing school. So many things "fell into place" at the time that made me feel that God wanted me to me a nurse too, so I understand.

    I can definately see that God indeed does have a sense of humor if God "calls" people into this crazy profession.

    I'm trying to stifle the inner voice that is telling me to pursue an MSN and teach. If it's God calling again, "call someone else, you didn't do too good the first time!". j/k

    I agree too about the need to remain objective.
    Last edit by Tweety on Aug 13, '06
  9. by   peds4now
    Okay, Matt sounds a little immature and goal-less, but he's probably young enough for that to make perfect sense. Good luck Matt, just research whatever you do so you don't waste your education dollars and time!

    But on a related topic... I am a student nurse intern, and all I hear at the nurses' station is money talk! Travelers, registry, staff, everyone is talking about how much they make, this or that overtime opp, how they need more money. Now, I'm a second career nurse and wasted a lot of time, but I wonder why someone in his/her thirties, who's been an RN for 10 years or so, can be so hurting for money? I mean, people are willing to work themselves to death, stay extra hours all the time, just for a bit more money! I love that such opps exist to maximize income, but I wonder if all these people mismanage their money or are compulsive gamblers/drug users or something-I mean, why can't they make do with $35/hour with a working spouse and 1-2 kids? I really do wonder.

    I look forward to times when I can be workaholic and get lots extra, but I hope I can refrain from talking $$ all the time on the job.

    Any insight?
  10. by   Gompers
    Quote from schooldays
    But on a related topic... I am a student nurse intern, and all I hear at the nurses' station is money talk! Travelers, registry, staff, everyone is talking about how much they make, this or that overtime opp, how they need more money. Now, I'm a second career nurse and wasted a lot of time, but I wonder why someone in his/her thirties, who's been an RN for 10 years or so, can be so hurting for money? I mean, people are willing to work themselves to death, stay extra hours all the time, just for a bit more money! I love that such opps exist to maximize income, but I wonder if all these people mismanage their money or are compulsive gamblers/drug users or something-I mean, why can't they make do with $35/hour with a working spouse and 1-2 kids? I really do wonder.
    Nurses make middle-class wages. Real estate and gas prices now are completely inflated, so trying to own a home and drive a car these days is quite challenging. Plus kids are so expensive! If a nurse is making $35 an hour after working for 10 years, then he/she is most likely in a larger city where housing prices are completely inflated. Just because a nurse has to work overtime or is obsessed with money doesn't mean that he/she is irresponsible or a gambler! It means that they're HUMAN and living in America, where we have to work hard to make a decent living.

    That is, unless you're a basketball player. :angryfire
  11. by   Gompers
    OOOPS duplicate post.

    Last edit by Gompers on Aug 13, '06
  12. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from schooldays
    Okay, Matt sounds a little immature and goal-less, but he's probably young enough for that to make perfect sense. Good luck Matt, just research whatever you do so you don't waste your education dollars and time!

    But on a related topic... I am a student nurse intern, and all I hear at the nurses' station is money talk! Travelers, registry, staff, everyone is talking about how much they make, this or that overtime opp, how they need more money. Now, I'm a second career nurse and wasted a lot of time, but I wonder why someone in his/her thirties, who's been an RN for 10 years or so, can be so hurting for money? I mean, people are willing to work themselves to death, stay extra hours all the time, just for a bit more money! I love that such opps exist to maximize income, but I wonder if all these people mismanage their money or are compulsive gamblers/drug users or something-I mean, why can't they make do with $35/hour with a working spouse and 1-2 kids? I really do wonder.

    I look forward to times when I can be workaholic and get lots extra, but I hope I can refrain from talking $$ all the time on the job.

    Any insight?
    For what it's worth, I think you'd be hard-pressed to find anyone, anywhere, who isn't paying some extra attention to money matters these days. Fuel costs are rising, prices for so many other things are rising in relation to that.

    Aside from that, though, something comes to mind. You'd probably be surprised at how many people who are upper class socioeconomically don't consider themselves such, and actually feel they are HURTING for money. Example will be an unnamed relative (avoiding a family war!!) who makes well into the six-figure range, takes several vacations a year, buys herself designer duds and spa treatments quite regularly, and still cries poverty. Not just "wish I had this", but actually "I can't AFFORD" whiny complaints. The money is always there, but priorities are sometimes....different.

    My husband and I are very fortunate. His income has allowed me to go to school without being employed and our children to have extras for which we are very grateful. However, we find ourselves, even now, thinking "if we just had THIS much money, we could have THAT" or "how come we aren't better off if we have this much money??". Stuff like that. I can't imagine how people make half of his salary and support a family, and yet it's so very commonplace to do so.

    Eye of the beholder!
  13. by   military spouse
    Quote from schooldays
    Okay, Matt sounds a little immature and goal-less, but he's probably young enough for that to make perfect sense. Good luck Matt, just research whatever you do so you don't waste your education dollars and time!

    But on a related topic... I am a student nurse intern, and all I hear at the nurses' station is money talk! Travelers, registry, staff, everyone is talking about how much they make, this or that overtime opp, how they need more money. Now, I'm a second career nurse and wasted a lot of time, but I wonder why someone in his/her thirties, who's been an RN for 10 years or so, can be so hurting for money? I mean, people are willing to work themselves to death, stay extra hours all the time, just for a bit more money! I love that such opps exist to maximize income, but I wonder if all these people mismanage their money or are compulsive gamblers/drug users or something-I mean, why can't they make do with $35/hour with a working spouse and 1-2 kids? I really do wonder.

    I look forward to times when I can be workaholic and get lots extra, but I hope I can refrain from talking $$ all the time on the job.

    Any insight?
    Hi,
    I am very blessed to not be one of those nurses that needs to work additional hours. I typically work 16 hours per week. I do know several nurses that are very similar to those you have described. Many have house payments, taxes, private school for their children, max out 401k's, Roth IRAs, etc. I also work with some single parents and I have no idea how they make it. Life is surprisingly expensive. I've known people with health/dental insurance that still leave with large bills for "their portion." I know we pay close to half our income in taxes: Federal, State, local, Medicare, Social Security, property taxes and school taxes. :angryfire My husband contributes $15,000 to his 401k. I contribute 30% to my 401k (amount will vary depending upon hours worked). Together we contribute $8,000 to our Roth IRAs. $4000 for daughter's private school, plus additional money for before/after school care. Fortunately, we did a prepaid tuition plan for her college many years ago. By the time we throw some money into gas, insurance, other investments and "fun money" it is all gone. Hubby has military pension that covers our housing costs and allows us to prepay our mortgage so that it should be paid off in 8 years or so. If he lost his current job, I would have to work A LOT to continue on our current plan. Boy, I better go check my bank account to see how many pennies I have left to spend:spin:

close