I think I'm done with nursing. - page 5

by MBrickle 14,525 Views | 71 Comments

I've had a tough few weeks of self-reflection. My mind has gone back and forth over my preferred career path, and, ultimately, I think I'm going to bow out gracefully. I am a career-change RN. After receiving two bachelor... Read More


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    Sounds to me like your desire for acute care is very strong. Leaving nursing may give you some time and distance from the acute disappointment you are feeling. Trying to orient into a difficult specialty within the acute care environment is very difficult. I've seen many nurses trying to break into the operating room in the past four years and many quit early or quit late. My advise would be to look outside the acute care setting for information, perhaps to the professional organizations. In addition, there are, more than likely, preparatory courses you might consider, even if you have to relocate temporarily to do them. The last thing I would say is perhaps seeking the advanced degree while working in a different area would be worth the effort. Try networking with some educators in the university setting that ladders ADNs into BSNs. It may not be as difficult as you think.

    At any rate, be kind to yourself and take some time for yourself.

    Bless you,
    Marie
    anotherone likes this.
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    Quote from MBrickle
    I've had a tough few weeks of self-reflection. My mind has gone back and forth over my preferred career path, and, ultimately, I think I'm going to bow out gracefully.I am a career-change RN. After receiving two bachelor degrees in non-nursing fields, I realized what I had really known all along - nursing was for me. I worked hard, I worked full time, I put myself through school, I was at the top of my class....andddd...I got a pedi home health job. My ADN isn't worth the paper it's written on in the Northeast.THEN, I blew my back out. Massive herniation, 6 months off work, and pain to end all pain. I deal with workers comp, I rehab (luckily no surgery) and I get back to work this past June.My DREAM is to be an acute care nurse. I love working with high-acuity and in a fast-paced, think-on-your-feet environment...as someone who as always craved more 'excitement,' this is for me. BUT, I have an ADN. And even with a BSN, hospitals aren't hiring you unless you have previous hospital experience (usually already in the specialty you are trying to break in to,) and you can't get experience of any kind because nobody will hire you to begin with. Add to that a back injury, and I'm further limited to PICU, but preferably NICU as I really do not want to temp fate with my back...and REFUSE a future filled with spinal fusions and all that jazz.I tried to convince myself to be an FNP. I even toyed with PA school, but I'm so frustrated by all of the courses that I will have to re-take since I am past my 10 year expiration for most schools.I'm frustrated. I would be a STELLAR ICU nurse. I really would. I have fought so hard to get here and it's taken years. I just don't think I have much fight left in me. Moving isn't an option as my husband makes more than double what I do and has a job with a large pay potential. It is just so discouraging to see that travel nurses are getting hired all over the place because they are cheaper from every angle. Local nurses need the jobs! I'm just over it at this moment. I am just treading water and getting sick of it. Hard work has officially gotten me nowhere and there is no silver lining in sight.Just needed to rant/vent/sulk/express my frustrationMay as well go back to my pre-nursing legal career where I made the same money, didn't have to do nearly as much work, and wasn't in a field that constantly tempted me to do more and be more, but knowing that the goals I have in mind are pretty unattainable.:::END PITY PARTY:::
    The impression I get from this post is that you are so frustrated with your lot in life that you are ready to give up and stop trying. However, to quote my late dad, "You can be 40 with a (insert choice accomplishment) or you can be 40 without one. Either way, you're still going to be 40." In other words, who cares how long it takes you. If you want it, do it. Volunteer to get your feet wet in a CC unit. A tough economy, like any other tough circumstance, will always weed out those without the grit. Maybe keep that in mind? Sometimes, immediate gratification shouldn't be gratifying at all. Just saying.....
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    You are the one who knows yourself best. You only have one life to live. Why do something that makes you miserable?, just to not be a quiter or "stick to it "or some other martyr reason?? At least doing it for the money , job security, health insurance or you actually like the job , now those are good reasons . because of a dream you had long ago? useless. no shame in giving up. It is just a job!!!! working in a phyisical job with tons of pain just to stick with it, when you dont want to or have to, is pathetic imo and potentially harmful in the long run.
    netglow likes this.
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    I think that the "as long as it takes" mode responses must be from students. You guys need to start doing a little research on what's what in healthcare. Spend some time reading threads and educate yourselves on all of this, as it will be your situation soon, too!

    "Just volunteer to get your feet wet in a CCU" - OK, I don't know that came from?!

    Once you are an RN, you can't volunteer in a hospital as you are suggesting, StudentEtc. The idea of being a volunteer is not appropriate or really allowed in acute care, or really much of anywhere, a legal nightmare. Yes you can volunteer as an RN eg sports events, charity runs, etc. or even in disasters. But you need to not be a new nurse, then. You must have malpractice insurance, and you would be on your own, so you would best be someone who has ER exp. So, you need to have experience. Some hospitals allow student interns or externs (precious few) these days - this is what you should understand. A hospital volunteer, at least in my area is restricted to non-clinical people eg. helping family find the cafe, getting a newspaper, helping by being a runner, etc. Volunteers are not in any form allowed to enter into any duty that might muddy the waters clinically.
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    Quote from netglow
    I think that the "as long as it takes" mode responses must be from students. You guys need to start doing a little research on what's what in healthcare. Spend some time reading threads and educate yourselves on all of this, as it will be your situation soon, too! "Just volunteer to get your feet wet in a CCU" - OK, I don't know that came from?!Once you are an RN, you can't volunteer in a hospital as you are suggesting, StudentEtc. The idea of being a volunteer is not appropriate or really allowed in acute care, or really much of anywhere, a legal nightmare. Yes you can volunteer as an RN eg sports events, charity runs, etc. or even in disasters. But you need to not be a new nurse, then. You must have malpractice insurance, and you would be on your own, so you would best be someone who has ER exp. So, you need to have experience. Some hospitals allow student interns or externs (precious few) these days - this is what you should understand. A hospital volunteer, at least in my area is restricted to non-clinical people eg. helping family find the cafe, getting a newspaper, helping by being a runner, etc. Volunteers are not in any form allowed to enter into any duty that might muddy the waters clinically.
    OK, totally off base for me to say "to get your feet wet" (it's true, I have no experience in a clinical setting), but the mentality is to build relationships. Wasn't aware you couldn't volunteer as an RN, as I've read different threads here that suggest otherwise. I stand corrected. I'm just more stuck on the idea that OP appears to be spending A LOT of time pursuing "interests/goals", but not A LOT of time considering the commitment. Seems like quite a few major roles to back out of because OP is "frustrated." Isn't life frustrating? Isn't the higher goal to learn how to be in a good "place" (read: learning how to be centered/grounded/etc) in the face of tasks/jobs/commitments that are unsavory???
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    No, actually it's not. Not in nursing. And, I'm not trying to be disagreeable here. You will soon understand a few things grasshopper the more you read personal accounts on this forum and the further you go along in your edu. certain things will become clear.
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    MBrickle: I feel your pain! I have been a nurse for ten years and almost every day I feel that even though I love what I do (hospice) I wonder why I do it some days.

    I could rant about the idiotic management and pay cuts and staff layoffs, working on call 24/7 ... but this is your thread and your question.

    It's rough out there. I have not seen signs of a nursing shortage at all, and everyone wants a BSN. Sometimes I think we have to pay our dues including taking the job that you can get for experience, hanging in there for a year, and hope that's enough to break the ice elsewhere.

    I'm sorry about your back. That should be a nursing 101 topic -- that this job will take your back and then your knees.
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    Quote from netglow
    No, actually it's not. Not in nursing. And, I'm not trying to be disagreeable here. You will soon understand a few things grasshopper the more you read personal accounts on this forum and the further you go along in your edu. certain things will become clear.
    Understood. Things are more clear than you suspect, to be sure.
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    Quote from StudentEtc.
    OK, totally off base for me to say "to get your feet wet" (it's true, I have no experience in a clinical setting), but the mentality is to build relationships. Wasn't aware you couldn't volunteer as an RN, as I've read different threads here that suggest otherwise. I stand corrected. I'm just more stuck on the idea that OP appears to be spending A LOT of time pursuing "interests/goals", but not A LOT of time considering the commitment. Seems like quite a few major roles to back out of because OP is "frustrated." Isn't life frustrating? Isn't the higher goal to learn how to be in a good "place" (read: learning how to be centered/grounded/etc) in the face of tasks/jobs/commitments that are unsavory???
    First of all, yes, I have been spending a lot of time pursuing "interests/goals" because pursuing those interests is how I am going to achieve my goals (PALS certification, neonatal resuscitation, BSN, etc.) And in my humble opinion, having goals leads to success in life and helps to direct a path. Sorry if you feel differently. Also, yes, frustration is a part of life, a big one, but I'm sorry that I didn't know that means I can't vent about it? In that case, half the posts on this site shouldn't even be allowed since many of them are the result of ACTUAL NURSES venting about their jobs! I am more than aware of the commitment it takes to achieve my goal, as I was well aware of the commitment it would take to change careers and become a nurse, or the commitment I would need to make to becoming a home care nurse and researching techniques and information on diagnoses, etc. But that doesn't mean that sometimes I cannot feel frustrated that the only thing holding me back from advancing in my self-appointed career path is the economy and the lack of jobs in my area, especially when some nurses are swimming in job offers. That IS frustrating. Especially when I have a bad back from working in home health where the environment is set up for the patient and NOT the nurse (as it should be) and I have nobody to ask for help in repositioning a patient...that limits my job prospects significantly and adds another obstacle.

    Yes, ultimately the higher goal is to be in a "good" place, but part of that includes job satisfaction as a piece of the whole. For someone so "enlightened" you should take a minute to jump off your high horse...the view is more realistic from down here.
    cynforgiven, anotherone, OCNRN63, and 4 others like this.
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    I think we need to recognize that the job market is really poor and that many of these new grads are being sold a bill of goods about the non existent nursing shortage and the world in your oyster line of bull.....and they are extremely disappointed, and shocked, after graduation. It criminal what some of these nursing schools are doing to get students money these days. No longer i nursing the guaranteed job....where colleges/schools are concerned it's buyer beware.

    Allnurses supports a flame free atmosphere. We can agree to disagree....politley and respectfully. You are free to disagree with anyone on any type of subject matter as long as your criticism is constructive and polite. Additionally, please refrain from name-calling...... This is divisive, rude, and derails the thread.

    Our first priority is to the members that have come here because of the flame-free atmosphere we provide. There is a zero-tolerance policy here against personal attacks. We will not tolerate anyone insulting other's opinion nor name calling.
    Our call is to be supportive, not divisive

    We can agree to disagree without being disagreeable.......Gerald Ford.


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