How smart are you? - page 3

I have read so many threads here that go back and forth about how easy or hard nursing school is. I hope that you can tell me more...are the people that say that nursing school isn't so bad... Read More

  1. by   Annieisfun
    I like the post by "abbythe tabby". The truth of the matter is that you will only get out of nursing school what you are willing to put into it. I just graduated this past May. Now I have a (not job,but) career that I love, which i pursued while divorced with 4 kids and 2 jobs. Attend class every day, take notes and find points which interest you. If you are smart enough to get into nursing school (a very competitive schooling choice), then you are smart enough to pass. Self knowledge, of both strenghts and weaknesses will get you to you goals. someone had menthioned knowing your learning style, I am a kenitic learner. Hands on all the way, so I will add don't miss clinicals either. also, dont stress. the "I can't do this", attitude is self fulfilling.
    Dianne
  2. by   nurse2bmlb
    I am currently in nursing school and I have a 3.0 GPA....I didn't do well in high school and as a matter of fact I dropped out of high school. It is truly my passion to be a nurse that keeps me going. It is very time consuming and I feel like quitting everday, but when I walk away from clinicals that is when I remember why I am doing this. I love it! I love patient care! That is what it is about for me and that is what keeps me going. Good time management skills are a plus b/c it is a lot of work and I am tired and frustrated alot but it is what I love!
  3. by   jkfraser
    I'm a nursing student, making decent grades, with a family to keep me busy when school/clinicals is not. I would say that the process of nursing school has made me a better student. I also have a BA in Psychology and see that my aptitude is for the theory/analytical material, and I'm less technically minded, but I'm learning...It's hard, but doable if you apply some discipline, making time to study, and being prepared for lecture and clinical makes it a better experience.

    I take issue with the person who said that nursing is one of those professionals of all grunt work... I whole heartedly disagree! Sure there is physical, sometimes unpleasant work to do, but the excellent nurse is one who is always thinking, using her critical thinking skills and analysis, and making sure that her priorities are providing the best care for each patient. I would not want to be cared for by someone who thinks her job is to perform grunt work... I would want to be cared for by someone who is genuinely interested in providing good quality care.

    Last edit by jkfraser on Oct 19, '06
  4. by   mom4sure
    Quote from psycteach
    I have read so many threads here that go back and forth about how easy or hard nursing school is. I hope that you can tell me more...are the people that say that nursing school isn't so bad genuises? :wink2: Are the people that really struggle coming from less than average backgrounds in high school? I have a degree in psychology and secondary education from a good university but I worked hard for my B average... does that mean nursing school is out of my league... and please don't sugar-coat it by saying that if my dream really is to be a nurse then I will do fine, etc.... Please be honest: are all you successful nurses out there "super smart"?
    You don't have to be super smart, just committed to being a nurse. The grade received in school will not determine how good a nurse you are. Only you can make that distinction.
  5. by   BoomerRN
    Yes, I was a "B" student. Nursing school was very hard for me because I had 3 very small children at home. My husband helped when he could. I stayed up very late at night completing assignments and went without sleep lotsa times. I found that I had to manage my time well and study hard. I probably could have made better grades if I would have had more time, but like I said I had a family and I didn't want to totally ignore them.
  6. by   MedSurgeMess
    I graduated with honors from an ASN program, then a BSN program-all As to boot! I thought it was easy, but knew others that I thought were pretty smart that struggled the whole time. BTW, I have 2 teenage sons who thought they didn't need mom, and I worked full time the whole way thru-on the night shift even! I think it just falls to study habits, because I didn't ignore my kids or DH. If you are having trouble, ask the instructor that you relate with the most and the instructor that you are having most trouble in their class for advice on how to study for their class. It lets them know that you want to succeed, plus gives you a couple of ways to study. Hope this helps :wink2:
  7. by   smk1
    Quote from psycteach
    I have read so many threads here that go back and forth about how easy or hard nursing school is. I hope that you can tell me more...are the people that say that nursing school isn't so bad genuises? :wink2: Are the people that really struggle coming from less than average backgrounds in high school? I have a degree in psychology and secondary education from a good university but I worked hard for my B average... does that mean nursing school is out of my league... and please don't sugar-coat it by saying that if my dream really is to be a nurse then I will do fine, etc.... Please be honest: are all you successful nurses out there "super smart"?
    Hmmm, well I am by no means a genius, however I am a pretty smart lady. However I think that the key (so far) to nursing school for me is developing good memory skills, fast reading and retention skills and good time management. There are some difficult concepts and certain body systems etc... are harder than others, but the main issue is that nursing school is so very time consuming. There are days where you have every minute of your time mapped out to the second from the time you wake up in the morning. Get your ducks in a row before you start, and work on memory. Not that nursing tests are memory tests, but you need to be able to remember what you have read without the added benefit of constant "study". You really do have to read and then move on. No time for going back and rereading whole chapters etc... get really honest about your study habits, priorities and time, and get a schedule mapped out and most likely you will be fine.
  8. by   smk1
    Quote from abbythetabby
    The smartest student in our class also happens to be the worst at patient care. I'm usually in the top three. Am I smart? Supposedly, if you believe standardized testing. Does it really matter? No. I love studying nursing, so I do well and I was blessed with good genes. And I still have to put a lot of time into it. But I would rather be a C student who actually has the capacity to care about a patient than be that smart girl without a heart. And as a patient, who would you rather have care for you? The nurse who will advocate for you or the one who only cares about the paycheck? In nursing, a C student still has a heck of a lot of knowledge.
    Can we please not turn this into an A student = bad clinical nurse, C student = great clinical nurse debate. Honestly if I were a patient I wouldn't know what my nurses grades were, but if I had a choice I would want the nurse who had BOTH qualities. Having said that, I guess I should give my stats like everyone else, In high school I was in all honors classes at a great school. I fooled around and graduated around 2.7. My college GPA upon acceptance into my nursing program was over 3.8, My first quarter of nursing was 4.0, and I currently am holding a 4.0 this term as well. Married with a small child. It is doable. So far it has been busy and moderately difficult, nothing exceedingly hard though. I had a great clinical eval last quarter and I think I am doing well this quarter as well. In the end as long as you pass and have enough knowledge to safely practice as a new grad, then you've done all that you needed too.
  9. by   Roy Fokker
    I'm super smart....

    You just won't know that from my test scores.










    All jokes aside - I think I'm average intelligence.
    But I'm terrible at written testing - especially those testing theory.

    Every teacher from 3rd grade on has complained that "he asks intelligent questions in class and answers any question he is asked. He is brilliant in lab. My opinion is that he doesn't apply himself when it comes to tests".

    I'm ace at clinical and lab work. I do great in class. I help with study sessions and am fantastic with explaining contexts and other issues to my classmates....

    BUT....


    .... sit me in front of a question paper and bubble sheet and I revert to some kind of idiot!


    cheers,
  10. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from BoomerRN
    Yes, I was a "B" student. Nursing school was very hard for me because I had 3 very small children at home. My husband helped when he could. I stayed up very late at night completing assignments and went without sleep lotsa times. I found that I had to manage my time well and study hard. I probably could have made better grades if I would have had more time, but like I said I had a family and I didn't want to totally ignore them.


    I worked two jobs and went through full time school. I thought I had it bad ...
    .... untill I met a classmate who worked a fulltime job and was raising a 2 year old girl all by herself while attending full time school!



    Any parent who still works and does school has my deepest respect. I doubt I could do it and retain my sanity!
  11. by   onlyhope
    I have BA in psychology and have gone on to an ABSN program. In my first degree I did a little bit better (just about straight A's, now i get a fair mix of A's and B's). I would say that nursing is not necessarily harder but its definately DIFFERENT. in many of my psychology classes it really was just about learning the material and regurgitating it for the tests. in nursing you have to learn the material and be able to apply it in so many different situations. I suggest buying a book on test taking strategies and nursing and ALWAYS remember Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs (trust me this will make sense once you are in school). The tests are tricky but i know that when i do well on a test i always feel like i have accomplished something. Also a good piece of advice i learned in my first semester C=RN.
  12. by   FairyPrincess06
    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    I did not do well in high school, or my SAT's. I guess I did well enough in the NLN test prior to starting school, but I think the thing that helps most is the fact that you already had college courses. Everyone knows that good study skills are so important when you go to college and I did not apply myself in high school at all. I only did well at Nursing school after I almost failed. I had to learn to study while I was in nursing school, because I never did have good study habits in high school.
    I would not say I was ever the brightest bulb in the bunch, but after I learned how to study and take notes in class, I felt nursing school was easy.

    I feel like that could be me right now. What kinds of things did you do to get better at studying because I am having the hardest time studying anatomy?
  13. by   Brand new RN
    Quote from FairyPrincess06
    I feel like that could be me right now. What kinds of things did you do to get better at studying because I am having the hardest time studying anatomy?
    I'm also taking anatomy as a pre-nursing student and managing an A. I'm maintaining that A because I do some things to make the information "stick". I'm taking the class online, with pages and pages of what would be the prof's lecture notes that I print out for each test...some tests cover as much as 70 pages or better. I re-write those notes (I have quite a notebook full) so that I remember better and then review my written notes just before an exam on the material.
    Now, not everyone probably has to re-write the notes, but it works for me. Maybe it'll be something you can do too. If you're sitting in an anatomy class it's the equivalent of re-writing what the prof's lecture was.
    Hope this information makes sense to you and helps in some way.
    Deb

close