How many nurses do their own vitals??? - page 6

Hi all, Well at my one place they just posted something stating that since they are so short on PCTs that the RNs will be responsible for doing their first set of vitals. This, I feel is insane. ... Read More

  1. by   MishlB
    Yes, I do know what an aides job is...HOWEVER, if this nurse is not going to ask for assistance, and only be upset about the standing around, then oh well. She couldn't have gotten the vitals during her assessment? Sheesh...
  2. by   JWaldron
    Quote from MishlB
    Yes, I do know what an aides job is...HOWEVER, if this nurse is not going to ask for assistance, and only be upset about the standing around, then oh well. She couldn't have gotten the vitals during her assessment? Sheesh...

    ASKING for help? ASKING? Why should I be searching all over the floor for someone who has already been given an assignment by me. If the aide is busy taking care of our patients, then I already know where she is, and I already know why the VS were not done. And yes, I can get them during my assessment, but it is quite clear you missed the whole point being made. Too bad. I can't be bothered to argue with an unarmed opponent.

    And there is NEVER a reason for aides to be standing around when call bells are ringing.

    Marie, it's too bad anybody has to stay late; I didn't mean that LPN's just leave, no matter what; that's not the case. It all depends on the situation and the facility and the responsibilities. Whoever has the greatest responsibility always seems to end up with the short end of the stick when it comes to being on any given floor and having to hang around doing all the catch-up stuff, esp. documentation.

    Savvy
  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Lately the short end of this stick has left me with a chewed-up toothpick. I'd love to have just one **** day to stand around and do nothing. Wouldn't know what to do with myself. Someone would hunt me down.

    Although one word that's sent me into a laughing fit was the word delegate. Such a pretty little term that all of the books use. I've never been delegated any sort of task. What i HAVE gotten: "YOU need to NOW"s followed with the occasional point in the direction of the room and the fingersnap. You know, the kind that is supposed to get a kid's attention. I've seen people do that to their dogs to send them outside. That's not delegation, that's degradation. I could tell them to cut it out, but it's not fair (or professional) to the pt. to hear me tell the "delegator" where to put her fingers.

    And the floor i floated to LAST night, I'M the one that ran my butt off for 12 straight hours while the nurse spent two straight hours of her 6 hour shift reading the lastest issue of Cosmo!!!
  4. by   plumrn
    And the floor i floated to LAST night, I'M the one that ran my butt off for 12 straight hours while the nurse spent two straight hours of her 6 hour shift reading the lastest issue of Cosmo!!!
    __________________
    I hope you reported this worthless person, and she gets what she deserves- FIRED!
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from plumrn
    __________________
    I hope you reported this worthless person, and she gets what she deserves- FIRED!
    I had to write a note to the floor manager, but she won't be in till Monday. The nurse that i had problems with last night was charge nurse for those 6 hours. We're supposed to start talking to the charge nurse and then the NM, but i'm not going to that charge nurse.
  6. by   Anniekins
    I am graduating May 8th with my BSN :hatparty: :hatparty:
    Meanwhile, I'm a tech, and I always am asking the nurses what I can do to help them if I am caught up on vitals...call lights, accu checks, etc.....
    Why not.......to me, I'd rather help out the nurses and patients than stand around! Thats boring and makes time go SLOW!!!!!!
  7. by   Heartattaq
    Every floor other than surgical floors I have been on RN's do all their own vitals at all times. Personally I am more comfortabel doing them myself, I do them when I first walk in in the morning and am speaking with the patient and getting a mini assessment done.
  8. by   JWaldron
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    Lately the short end of this stick has left me with a chewed-up toothpick. I'd love to have just one **** day to stand around and do nothing. Wouldn't know what to do with myself. Someone would hunt me down.

    Although one word that's sent me into a laughing fit was the word delegate. Such a pretty little term that all of the books use. I've never been delegated any sort of task. What i HAVE gotten: "YOU need to NOW"s followed with the occasional point in the direction of the room and the fingersnap. You know, the kind that is supposed to get a kid's attention. I've seen people do that to their dogs to send them outside. That's not delegation, that's degradation. I could tell them to cut it out, but it's not fair (or professional) to the pt. to hear me tell the "delegator" where to put her fingers.

    And the floor i floated to LAST night, I'M the one that ran my butt off for 12 straight hours while the nurse spent two straight hours of her 6 hour shift reading the lastest issue of Cosmo!!!
    That's a shame, but I know what you're talking about. I floated for a number of years, and floats typically get the worst assignment on a unit, and often get assigned with the people nobody else wants to work with; definitely a challange. And not at all appropriate. We talk about professionalism, and wanting nurser to be taken seriously as capable professionals. Well, that kind of behavior sure doesn't demonstrate it. (Neither does the typical eating our young - what kind of caregiver behavior is THAT modeling?) I have never had time to do anything like that no matter what the aide did. Sounds like there was a whole lot more that nurse was not doing w/ regard to patient care than just answering call bells. I've worked every inpatient dept except ICU and Surgical Services from Presurgical to PAR, nor have I worked L&D, but just about everywhere else, and there sure wasn't time to do that anywhere. Or was I doing stuff that didn't need to be done, like taking care of patients? But I have seen RNs like that, and wondered how they cold keep getting away with it - the ons who do their assessment form the doorway, and don't even take their stethescopes out of their lockers.... and get their cigarette breaks and their meals and get out on time and talk a lot about how hard they work....

    Fingersnap? Well, not only is that not my style, I'd come out with more of a fingerthlub! After I get report and do a fast scan of the Kardex I give 'my' aide report and tell her what we need to do, and what I need at what time, and let her know that if she runs into any problems with the timing to let me know. We are teammates - neither of us can do as good a job by ourselves, and together we can make each other shine and take the best possible care of OUR patients. I don't and can't do it by myself and neither can she. The aides are the ones the make the patients feel the best - they are the ones with the greatest amount of hands-on time in many cases. No matter how much I may WANT to give a backrub, I can't be starting an IV, on the phone with the doc or a family, and inserting a foley and doing that all at the same time.

    When I worked with an LPN, it was the same - we were a team, at least in my mind, and I depended tremendously on the skill and wisdom of that LPN, because at that time I was responsible for 16 severely ill people.. I learned and am still learning from wonderful LPNs. Now I work only with an aide or a shared aide, and am only responsible for 8 people, on a REHAB unit, instead of a M/S unit, but most of my patienst are nearly as sick, and they are up OOB and dressed, and they are still a 4-person sliding board transfer to a commode, because we don't use bedpans except in rare occassions. and We straight-cath our patients instead of having indwelling foleys (and we don't have a bladder scanner, so anybody who doesn't viod, or void very mcuh, gets cathed. And all the neurogenic bladders get cathed, and on and on.


    Savvy
  9. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from Anniekins
    I am graduating May 8th with my BSN :hatparty: :hatparty:
    Meanwhile, I'm a tech, and I always am asking the nurses what I can do to help them if I am caught up on vitals...call lights, accu checks, etc.....
    Why not.......to me, I'd rather help out the nurses and patients than stand around! Thats boring and makes time go SLOW!!!!!!

    Hey, wanna come to work with me?
  10. by   TinyNurse
    In the ER, I do my own vitals once an hour, and before giving meds. I mean you are in the room doing a pain assessment, checking namebands, repositioning,talking to the patient etc, why not grab a set of vitals while you are there???
  11. by   The Bear
    Quote from AmyRN1227
    Hi all,
    Well at my one place they just posted something stating that since they are so short on PCTs that the RNs will be responsible for doing their first set of vitals. This, I feel is insane. Especially since at around the time the first vitals are being done by the PCTs, we are doing assessments, passing meds, and like the other nite I was giving prep for a bowel procedure. And I don't mind helping out, as it was stated on the memo "We will all be expected to accommodate the needs of the unit" but when I see PCTs standing around doing nothing and I'm also doing their vitals it really angers me. I feel like they just keep dumping more and more things on us and they wonder why we have so many lawsuits...
    :uhoh21: :uhoh21:
    Just wondering if this is a requirement anywhere else...Amy
    The vitals are needed by us to make our assessments. I rather see the PCTs or what ever, doing the blood draws, transfers, stocking, and bed changing. The time it takes to do vitals is not that much more, when they are done with the assessments. We all got too use to having these "nurse helpers" do "OUR" pts vital signs! We need to embrace this job again and see it as necessary for our total assessment of out pts.
  12. by   nekhismom
    I think pt. ratio does have a LOT to do with it. But I don't think it's ALWAYS unreasonable to do your own vitals. I mean, if you use a dynamap, you can have them in like 30 sec-1 min, and you can be assessing other things while the machine runs. Now sometimes, we ALL know that things are so hectic and we just don't have time. I think it's OK to ask a CNA/tech to get vitals, but it's just being safe if you check the vitals yourself once.

    Tweety, I know you primarily work in ER. What I have seen many nurses in my hospital do is this. The tech does the first set, and any other routines. The nurse does any follow up if needed, and VS upon discharge. That way, nobody is pushed to their limits. IT works well.

    I don't think there is any one correct answer to cover everything. In my dept, it would be silly for me to call a tech just to read a monitor and do a temp. I can easily do that myself, and I would rather do a count of AP and RR myself than read the monitor. BUt that's just me. I think if we have techs available, then you should use their help within reason. Nurses should use their professional judgement to determine if techs do the vs or if the nurse will do them.
  13. by   sandy06
    This has been a very interesting post. I am a CNA in an ICU/Tele unit. I am also a nursing student. We do all the v/s q4 and frankly, I don't mind. I think it is a good thing for me to make rounds, meet my patients and get v/s, check trash, check for i&o, etc. Nurses get just as slammed as we do and I think we all need to work together. How hard is it to take v/s and when abnormal go to the nurses station and mention it before charting?

    I mean really, it seems as though we are talking about unusual situations when we find RNs and CNAs sitting around. I am sure there are lazy nurses and lazy CNAs, but for those of us who are doing our jobs - patient care - then that may mean staying busy for a shift - and mine are 12 hours. Like others, I would rather be busy then bored. Not to mention, being a student it only helps me by getting more patient contact and learning so I am ready for the future!

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