Heinous or Forgivable??? - page 7

I was doing a 1:1 observation with an elderly confused woman who tends to wander. So I was in the room with her and the 19 year old unit clerk came in with a piece of paper that said " My name is... Read More

  1. by   NicuGal
    I would have to report that. And not be so nice about it.
  2. by   casperbjs
    How sad that she has to do something like that to a patient! She really needed to be told about her actions. She wanted to bury everyone else right along with her (well, everyone else does it).
    That's not a good enough answer. She needs to grow up and get her kicks somewhere else.
  3. by   Streamlined
    I remember being young and dumb, don't you? This clerk isn't mean , just young,clueless, anxious and trying to prove that she's at least paying attention. If she wants to be a nurse and has some good qualities, she could use the guidance of her role models. Someone set her straight, please, in private, in a non-threatening manner, and we'll have a more worthy colleague some day.
  4. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    As long as the clerk is willing to tape a sign like "dysfunctional theraputic technique......................stay back 500 feet"
  5. by   jode
    To treat another human being in such an inhuman manner is absolutely inexcusable.
  6. by   jode
    At 19 years of age, I was in charge of a 40 bed unit at night and NEVER did it occur to me to treat anyone with that kind of disrespect. There is no excuse for the behavior. Age 5 maybe.....
  7. by   VivaLasViejas
    Both my daughter, age 20, and I work in the same nursing facility, and let me tell you, she didn't need any training or in-services or a**bites to teach her how to treat residents with respect. As young as she is, she knows instinctively how to behave with all types of residents---even the most demented of them---and she would no more put a "label" on a confused wanderer than I would. The youth of the employee in question neither explains nor excuses her insensitivity. I hope she realizes that she is not cut out for this line of work BEFORE she wastes a lot of money, her instructors' time, and her employer's reputation.
  8. by   sharann
    HEINOUS of the US. on her.
  9. by   nursejudy15209
    Maybe this clerk was acting on someone else's authority. clerks are usually too busy doing desk stuff -that for her to take the time to put this sign on a patient's back-well, she was not doing this on her own, was she?

    After reading all the comments, I have to admit that people were downright opinionated about the whole thing.

    I feel sure that there is more than meets the eye when it comes to this story.

    Just my humble opinion. I would like to put signs on people's backs -- "Danger, keep away!" (for instance when a resident has a history of lashing out at another without warning) Just kidding!

    Or put a sign on a doctor's back that says "Catch me, if you can" Or maybe one on the cook "Read my lips--we don't have steak!" What about a housekeeper "Beware of frequent stops" Or how about one for the administrator-"I'm watching you"
    Then there must be a sign for the the receptionist- "I put everybody on hold, nothing personal"

    Just trying to lighten this thread a bit, no offense intended.

    Everything we need to know, we learned in kindergarten and life exemplifies what we do with that knowledge.
  10. by   pebbles
    I think it was rude and disrespectful.

    But then, I have to note, our hospital does have sweatshirts for wandering patients that are bright green... I think they say "if found, please call, with the phone # of the hospital security dept on them. Underneath the hospital's logo design of course. Some units have a wanderguard system, but those that don't have to use the sweatshirts or sitters/constant attendants. ALL wandering (or potential) pt's get photographs taken by security which are kept in the front of the chart for if the pt does go missing.

    Are these sweatshirts just as disagreeable, I wonder?
  11. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by pebbles
    I think it was rude and disrespectful.

    But then, I have to note, our hospital does have sweatshirts for wandering patients that are bright green... I think they say "if found, please call, with the phone # of the hospital security dept on them. Underneath the hospital's logo design of course. Some units have a wanderguard system, but those that don't have to use the sweatshirts or sitters/constant attendants. ALL wandering (or potential) pt's get photographs taken by security which are kept in the front of the chart for if the pt does go missing.

    Are these sweatshirts just as disagreeable, I wonder?
    I happen to think so....Any pt with the potential to wander should be in a unit equipped with a security system..If it means moving a few beds then so be it.....Those systems maintain the highest levels of safety and dignity for those pts....Think about this-if your (I mean the general "you") 18 month old child were hospitilized would you stand for it having to wear a shirt with those intstructions? Or a big name tag like a dog wears? "If I am lost please return me to...." I think we would expect our children to be in a safe environment-just as we should demand the same for our elders.......
  12. by   illya
    this girl needs to go to a class on alzheimers and on one maturity
  13. by   SheilaK
    Not sure if what we have is any better. For our wander risks we have bright orange PJ's. If they are found downstairs off the unit staff walks up to themand asks if they can help them, a quick look at an armband tells where they belong. At the VA PJ's are given to all pt's, and color coded as to size. So you do see alot of diffent colors of PJ's. As to the clerk - let her come tomy unit as a pt - hehehe

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