Grey's Anatomy Premier!!! + How to Contact Show Creators - page 4

Oh my god! I haven't posted in a long time, but I just had to post again. I'm watching the premier of Grey's Anatomy -- any of you see this?? (new show on ABC) The Doctor, after being questioned... Read More

  1. by   laurainaz
    I also was offended by the comments made about nurses. Right after the intern said "Did you just call me a nurse?'" , my hubby looked at me and said, "Holy S##t, did you hear what she just said?". So, thanks for the email link, I just sent them my thoughts on the episode. :angryfire
  2. by   Stitchie
    :angryfire
    I never write networks either as I'm really not all that interested in TV, but I do watch some shows. Grey's Anatomy was such a huge disappointment, especially as it has replaced one of my favorite shows, Boston Legal. (Love James Spader ever since "Less Than Zero". Just love him)

    I fired off an email to ABC also in which I wished the worst possible demise for Grey's Anatomy. I found the show to be irresponsible towards the majority of the health care team -- and that healthcare cannot function without nurses.
  3. by   Stitchie
    Quote from dorisemoore1
    I must say I only caught the last 20 mins and I love it. After I get my BS in nursing I am going to medical school. It has always been a dream of mine. That show made me realize that everything I do and all the courses I take is for that goal. Just the thought that can be me...
    Be careful what you wish for.
  4. by   SCmomof3
    I did not watch the show but wrote them an email based on the disgusting things I've read here. Hopefully they will take them to heart.
  5. by   BELLE0924
    I'm probably going to get burned for this, but I really liked the show. I work in healthcare currently, and I will granduate with My RN in 8 weeks. The show is about 9 interns and what they go through in becoming Doctors. I agree that the first show didn't depict nurses in the best light. The character Alex was a real jerk and treated the nurse with no respect, but that is his character. At the end he ended up looking like idiot, not the nurse he tried to make feel like an idiot. How do we know that the show won't end up depicting nurses in a good light. No one seems to want to see what will happen. This isn't a show about nurses, and if it was would you get angry if it depicted doctors in a bad light. I just don't understand the immediate uprise.
  6. by   tntrn
    My DH and I also watched and at the end, he wanted to know what I thought. I think it's got possibilities. Alex is a jerk, and I took his attitude toward Dr. Grey and her response "did you call me a nurse" not so much as a putdown for nurses, but his stereotyping of all women as nurses. (He probably hates women and always has.) It's been established early and strongly that he's a jerk (probably in all aspects of his life) and haven't we all had to deal with docs just like him? (and not all of them male.) So I didn't see it as a negative toward nurses at all, but a good indication of just what giant jerk he is.

    The show is not about nurses; it is about doctors so I can't too excited about the lack of nursing characters. Maybe they'll have some in the future.

    The teenager was a spoiled brat and I've had teens put on their call light because they didn't get a call from a former boyfriend and when I pointed out that she was talking on the phone (and therefore the call couldn't get through) she asked me if we didnt' have call waiting? So that part fit right in too. Now granted, it wouldn't have been the intern/resident dealing with her directly like that, but again, it is a show about docs, not nurses.

    My DH is a pilot and we have a lot of fun critiquing aviation and health-care shows and movies. We get a lot of preverted and smug pleasure in pointing out all the inaccuracies or fabrications or truth-stretching that is done. It's a show meant to be entertaining. The real truth might not be a seller, so they have to "alter" things a bit.
  7. by   UTRN2005
    Just sent them my opinion via email
  8. by   Peachy720
    Quote from BELLE0924
    I'm probably going to get burned for this, but I really liked the show. I work in healthcare currently, and I will granduate with My RN in 8 weeks. The show is about 9 interns and what they go through in becoming Doctors. I agree that the first show didn't depict nurses in the best light. The character Alex was a real jerk and treated the nurse with no respect, but that is his character. At the end he ended up looking like idiot, not the nurse he tried to make feel like an idiot. How do we know that the show won't end up depicting nurses in a good light. No one seems to want to see what will happen. This isn't a show about nurses, and if it was would you get angry if it depicted doctors in a bad light. I just don't understand the immediate uprise.
    I'm glad you enjoyed it, Belle. I don't think anyone will burn you for liking it.

    I think the uprising is that there are so many shows out there painting MD's in a good light (ER, Grey's Anatomy, Scrubs, House, Resident Life, Chicago Hope, etc., etc.)...
    1. what can nurses watch and honestly enjoy?
    2. what message does this send to non-medical people watching at home? that nurses are the peons..people with no education who are just there to call the doctor when something other than cleaning up the patient is needed to be done.

    Note: Although I don't watch any of these shows anymore, I watched them all at some point (with the exception of "Grey's")..I think Scrubs is probably the least damaging to nurses.

    JMHO.
  9. by   BELLE0924
    Quote from Peachy720
    I'm glad you enjoyed it, Belle. I don't think anyone will burn you for liking it.

    I think the uprising is that there are so many shows out there painting MD's in a good light (ER, Grey's Anatomy, Scrubs, House, Resident Life, Chicago Hope, etc., etc.)...
    1. what can nurses watch and honestly enjoy?
    2. what message does this send to non-medical people watching at home? that nurses are the peons..people with no education who are just there to call the doctor when something other than cleaning up the patient is needed to be done.

    Note: Although I don't watch any of these shows anymore, I watched them all at some point (with the exception of "Grey's")..I think Scrubs is probably the least damaging to nurses.

    JMHO.




    Maybe with all our incredible minds out there we should be putting together a script for a show about Nursing students, or Rn's etc....
  10. by   Peachy720
    Quote from BELLE0924
    Maybe with all our incredible minds out there we should be putting together a script for a show about Nursing students, or Rn's etc....
    Sounds like a plan to me, Belle!!

    what shall we title it? "True Calling," "Nuthouse," or "Perfect Veins"? :spin:

    Take care,
    Tanya
  11. by   talaxandra
    I just don't understand the immediate uprise.
    Not having seen the program, I can't comment on it specifically. However, I can explain why so many nurses here have responded so vehemently and so quickly.

    Nursing is generally portrayed through stereotype - the ****, the battle-axe, the airhead, the saint, the lazy slattern, the 'born nurse', the hand maiden, and the husband-seeker. On the rare occasions that men are portrayed they are gay. (Off the top of my head - i'm sure there are others).

    Certainly there are nurses who (at least partly) meet these stereotypes, and stereotyping certainly occurs with other professions and groups.

    However, nurses are almost never portrayed in [I]any other way[/] than these stereotypes. Nursing itself, as portrayed in the media, looks undesirable

    Viewers of TV programming could not be blamed for thinking that nurses work subordinate to doctors, blindly follow medical 'orders', and are part of medical administration (doctors are seen firing or threatening to fire nurses, making hiring decisions etc).

    They could understandably think that the real work is done solely by doctors - on 'ER' the nurse:doctor ration is 1:10, in real life it is 2:1 or higher. Doctors are often portrayed performing some nursing duties, and nurses are often portrayed performing clerical duties.

    From watching popular culture, lay people may well believe that studying to be a nurse is vocational, takes a short amount of time, does not really require science or higher thinking or independant decision making. Nurses who chose further study are almost without exception shown transfering to medicine.

    Tthere is no portrayal of clincial specialisation, nurse practitioners, an autonomous career path or management heirarchy. There is no recognition of the role experienced nurse play in developing good doctors. And there is no reflection of the fact that nurses are the backbone of every health care system in the world.

    It could be argued that these programs are entertainment, not documentary, and that networks have no obligation to accurately portray nurses. But they are happy to take credit for increasing public awareness on other fronts. 'Will & Grace', for example, takes credit for providing relief from the stereotypical image of gay men - Will isn't campy, promiscuous, or shallow, he's respected in his (respected) career, and he's three dimensional.

    We are all agreed that there is a serious nursing shortage looming, and an ever-increasing demand for skilled nursing care. Nurses around the globe are seeking recognition for the demands and results of qualified nurses - reduced patient stays, improved outcomes, more efficient use of resources. Without a more accurate picture of who nurses are and what nursing is, the stereotype will predominate. Hand maidens who follow orders can be replaced by unskilled labour; promiscuous bimbos aren't worth improved pay and conditions; born nurses and saints don't have valuable professional skills.
    Last edit by talaxandra on Mar 28, '05
  12. by   LovePeaceJoy
    Wonderfully said!



    Quote from talaxandra
    Not having seen the program, I can't comment on it specifically. However, I can explain why so many nurses here have responded so vehemently and so quickly.

    Nursing is generally portrayed through stereotype - the ****, the battle-axe, the airhead, the saint, the lazy slattern, the 'born nurse', the hand maiden, and the husband-seeker. On the rare occasions that men are portrayed they are gay. (Off the top of my head - i'm sure there are others).

    Certainly there are nurses who (at least partly) meet these stereotypes, and stereotyping certainly occurs with other professions and groups.

    However, nurses are almost never portrayed in [I]any other way[/] than these stereotypes. Nursing itself, as portrayed in the media, looks undesirable

    Viewers of TV programming could not be blamed for thinking that nurses work subordinate to doctors, blindly follow medical 'orders', and are part of medical administration (doctors are seen firing or threatening to fire nurses, making hiring decisions etc).

    They could understandably think that the real work is done solely by doctors - on 'ER' the nurse:doctor ration is 1:10, in real life it is 2:1 or higher. Doctors are often portrayed performing some nursing duties, and nurses are often portrayed performing clerical duties.

    From watching popular culture, lay people may well believe that studying to be a nurse is vocational, takes a short amount of time, does not really require science or higher thinking or independant decision making. Nurses who chose further study are almost without exception shown transfering to medicine.

    Tthere is no portrayal of clincial specialisation, nurse practitioners, an autonomous career path or management heirarchy. There is no recognition of the role experienced nurse play in developing good doctors. And there is no reflection of the fact that nurses are the backbone of every health care system in the world.

    It could be argued that these programs are entertainment, not documentary, and that networks have no obligation to accurately portray nurses. But they are happy to take credit for increasing public awareness on other fronts. 'Will & Grace', for example, takes credit for providing relief from the stereotypical image of gay men - Will isn't campy, promiscuous, or shallow, he's respected in his (respected) career, and he's three dimensional.

    We are all agreed that there is a serious nursing shortage looming, and an ever-increasing demand for skilled nursing care. Nurses around the globe are seeking recognition for the demands and results of qualified nurses - reduced patient stays, improved outcomes, more efficient use of resources. Without a more accurate picture of who nurses are and what nursing is, the stereotype will predominate. Hand maidens who follow orders can be replaced by unskilled labour; promiscuous bimbos aren't worth improved pay and conditions; born nurses and saints don't have valuable professional skills.
  13. by   VSanchez123
    Quote from RNinMay2005
    Don't forget the comment by the teenaged patient implying nurses are clueless (when the intern was lost) or the idea that the nurse would page the doctor 911 because the patient was bored.
    I bet the Center for Nursing Advocacy will be all over this one with a letter writing campaign. YOu can bet your booty I'll be participating in that one. HOw disgusting!
    I've already emailed nursingadvocacy.org about this. They immediately responded that they have taped the show and will be viewing it. I think we all should write a letter/email to ABC as well. We cannot let this slide.

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