free tuition if I work for them for two years

  1. Hi everyone,

    I am currenlty applying to nursing schools to get my associate RN ( I all ready have a BS in Science). A local school is running a scholorship program where they will pay for your tuition, books, uniforms, etc. as you progress through their two year RN program but you have to sign a contract that says you will work for their hospital for two years upon graduation and passing of license exam.

    I have an informational interview with them in a few weeks and wanted to know what questions you think I should ask them in regards to this.

    Also, has anyone else out there gone through a similar program?
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   hollykate
    I did a program called NC nurse scholars- in return I had to work within the state for 2 years- similar but not the same.
    The only question I would ask would be how they handle someone who wants to leave before their two years are up- how do they handle the repayment?
    In lots of ways this is a good deal- but you need to check out the hospital, make sure it is a place you want to be for 2 years, and find out what they do when plans change- I mean, people get married, have to move because of a spouses job, have a child etc... Good Luck!!
  4. by   purplemania
    First, do the math. Is what they pay you after you graduate plus the cost of tuition equal to what you would be earning/paying tuition on your own? What does a starting RN earn there who was not in that program? Will they start you at a lower salary and, if so, how long will it take you to catch up to the others? Do they guarantee a job in any unit? Would you work there anyway, regardless of tuition help? Do they have an education incentive for current employees (may be to your advantage to work as unit clerk, etc. and let them pay tuition that way)? I chose not to participate in a program because they would hire me at a rate much lower than other grads and, even after "repaying" the tuition I would not be paid at par. You are smart to consider non-traditional options.
  5. by   Mijourney
    Hi Colleen10. I have some friends who chose the route you're considering to get your school expenses covered. In fact, increasingly, many physicians in my area choose this route having to commit to five years mostly in a rural area.

    As previous posters have pointed out, you need to thoroughly assess whether you'll have some say over what area you're assigned to; what type of orientation after graduation you should receive; if you can be transferred to another unit upon demand or request; what hours they'll require you to cover; what your starting pay will be and the benefits you'll be entitled to; and what the consequences will be if you quit, get laid off, or are fired. There are other considerations that I've not listed.

    My understanding from my friends were that they got paid what a new graduate would ordinarily get paid. They were entitled to all the benefits. They could apply to units that had openings, but they were only considered for hard to fill shifts like 2nd or 3rd. If you take this route, make sure you stay on the good side of your nursing instructors during your training if at all possible. Two of my friends told me that instructors who favored them were instrumental in getting them into their first choice of positions. Best wishes.
  6. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by colleen10:
    Hi everyone,

    I am currenlty applying to nursing schools to get my associate RN ( I all ready have a BS in Science). A local school is running a scholorship program where they will pay for your tuition, books, uniforms, etc. as you progress through their two year RN program but you have to sign a contract that says you will work for their hospital for two years upon graduation and passing of license exam.

    I have an informational interview with them in a few weeks and wanted to know what questions you think I should ask them in regards to this.

    Also, has anyone else out there gone through a similar program?
    I'm not saying this might happen to you, but just adding it to let you be aware to take great care, ask a lot of questions, and get it all in writing. I have an OB/GYN friend who got into one of those programs, as he was in a situation, where he really needed the assistance right after medical school. He was promised a location in an area, that he, and his family would like to set up practice in after he finished his obligations to the program. Unfortunately, this isn't what happened. He was sent to a very isolated area, where his children's education suffered, and it wasn't at all the kind of place they would ever have wanted to stay in. So he, and his new wife, who's a surgeon, decided to leave there, and go into practice, and pay the money back, that was owed. Again, unfortuantely, that wasn't the way it worked out. He was told, that with penalties, the amount added up to well over $500,000.00, with penalties continuing to be added!!! In fact they let him know, that there was NO amount, that they would accept, except for his continued participation in the program, as agreed! So he closed his practice, returned to the program, and was sent to a place he totally hated! This was an interacial couple, who was sent to a small town, with a very unenlighten outlook. His wife had stay in the Northwest, while he would travel back, and forth from the Southeast, on weekly basis!!! He described this program as being "a meat hook in my back". He finally was able to find a loophole which allowed him out of the program, after the program continued not provide him with what was promised. So be careful, and hopefully you will have much better success then he did. Best of Luck to you in reaching your goal.

    Brownie


    [This message has been edited by Brownms46 (edited March 21, 2001).]

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