The Ethics of Managing Your Personal Time - page 3

by Ruby Vee 15,839 Views | 35 Comments

Thereís a lot said about ethics in nursing, and much of it -- most of it, probably -- pertains toward the ethical treatment of patients. Not charting meds you havenít given or procedures you havenít done, admitting your med... Read More


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    This also reminds me of a few who frequently *get sick* in the middle of their shift and just have to go home NOW! Does no one else see the pattern of these *professional* nurses and their behavior? I just do not get it sometimes. Those who get away with stuff repeatedly. If I tried this even once, I would have guilt written all over my face and would have the big office visit on my next shift on!
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    Quote from nurse.sandi
    My own father died and I had to work. They were so great to me..they let me off to attend my only father's funeral. I do not know if this makes a difference but he was 52 years old and passed unexpectantly. Come on.. they couldn't find a replacement and I did not hear any of my coworkers trying to change shifts with me. Shame on me...lucky I did not know what I know now. Experience will change your life.
    This just broke my heart. I am so sorry for your loss. Your dad, and so young, and so unexpected. I can't comprehend a loss like that. How you worked, is beyond me. How cruel your co workers were, is what makes me angry. I hope no one has to go through what you had to, ever again. Unfortunately, I can see administration not caring. It has come to this and worse, but for coworkers...I am glad you shared this, another young nurse may read this and not go to work, when she needs to be with her family. Peace!
    noyesno likes this.
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    No reputable employer would be so heartless as to make you work when your own FATHER had died. I started a new job in the beginning of February. Right after starting, my own father was diagnosed with advanced melanoma and had a poor prognosis. I let my place of employment know immediately what was going on and from the get-go, they were nothing but kind and even offered to cover shifts if I needed to attend to family matters. When my father passed just 6 weeks after being diagnosed, my agency was incredibly kind, sympathetic, and told me to call them when I was ready. I needed about a week, and then I was ready to get back into the swing of thing. All places should be like this-I was touched by the kindness and concern shown, even with only being employed for a short time.

    Shame on those managers. I can't imagine they would come to work themselves in the same situation.
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    I find it hard to believe that for a 'caring' profession, people can be so uncaring to each other. What do people go into nursing for? Makes me wonder if it's been for the right reasons.
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    Quote from amlmom
    i find it hard to believe that for a 'caring' profession, people can be so uncaring to each other. what do people go into nursing for? makes me wonder if it's been for the right reasons.
    sigh . . . another keeper of the morality of reasons for going into nursing. there are lots of valid reasons for going into nursing, and it's not for any of us to decide if someone else's reasons for becoming a nurse are "the right reasons."
    JacknSweetpea and wooh like this.
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    I guess I'm fortunate. Where I work there are not many nurse call-ins, and when there are you can pretty much guarantee that nurse is actually ill. We did have a CNA awhile bsck that called in and then posted pictures on FB of herself drinking at a party when she should have been at work...she didn't last at work more than a couple weeks after that. No, she wasn't fired .We have a no fault call in policy, we are not even suppose to ask why somebody is calling though most callers volunteer their reason for missing work when they call. I think her co-workers made her life at work so miserable after that incident that she ended up quitting.
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    "If youíre not sick on Christmas Day, please donít call in sick and force the rest of us to work short."

    Nothing frosts me more than this perverted perspective. Nurses....you are not responsible for safely and professionally staffing your unit. But management has always loved the fact that you feel that way.

    If your unit enters crisis mode whenever a person call in, you need to find a new hospital.

    Until we all realize that it's staffing policies based solely on cost reduction that result in overworked nurses and patients at risk, this nurse guilt foolishness will continue ad nauseum.
    JacknSweetpea, Sugarcoma, wooh, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from interleukin
    "if youíre not sick on christmas day, please donít call in sick and force the rest of us to work short."

    nothing frosts me more than this perverted perspective. nurses....you are not responsible for safely and professionally staffing your unit. but management has always loved the fact that you feel that way.

    if your unit enters crisis mode whenever a person call in, you need to find a new hospital.

    until we all realize that it's staffing policies based solely on cost reduction that result in overworked nurses and patients at risk, this nurse guilt foolishness will continue ad nauseum.
    i must be missing your point. to me, the above quote makes perfect sense. if you're scheduled to work christmas day, work. unless you're really ill. if you don't work, your colleagues -- who might also prefer to spend the holiday off the clock -- are going to be working short. think what would happen if everyone who didn't feel like working christmas day called in sick. there's no way management could staff the unit if everyone did that! personal responsibility -- have some.
    nursel56 likes this.
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    Very well said, i work at a nhcc and we had a few "forget they were scheduled" on july 4m, and having less na's put the whole shift in stress, your trying to do your job plus theirs. when others call in you are taking from the patients care and what they deserve, as well as creating more work for your coworkers, our job is paitent care first and foremost, and if these coworkers have so many "funerals" to attend, maybe they should find a different profession. loved your article.
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    I totally agree. How many times have we been left to try and keep it together somehow when people call off for a frivilous reason. I had a C.N.A. call in on a Friday because she just found out she had cancer but she would be back on Monday. After empathazing with her situation and telling her if she needed additional time off, we would support her in her time of need, she said no, she would be back on Monday. On Monday she did return but was overheard while on break telling her friends she really went to visit relatives in another city. This post says what needs to be said about those who abuse time off with no regard to the people who are left to try pick up the slack when people call in for no good reason.
    Last edit by timetoshine on Jul 19, '11 : Reason: correct typos


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