Dropping Magnet - page 7

I found this interesting. One of this regions largest health system's flagship hospital has dropped it's Magnet certification. They have been certified since 2004 and was the first hospital in the... Read More

  1. Visit  moonshadeau profile page
    2
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    I found this interesting. One of this regions largest health system's flagship hospital has dropped it's Magnet certification. They have been certified since 2004 and was the first hospital in the state, outside the state capital, to recive Magent certification. They have a reputation of being an early adopter of technology and practice changes.

    They have been struggling with profitability the last 3-4 years and have layed off around 200 people across the system, including all of their clinical nurse specialists and a bunch of managers.

    Cost savings is the reason given to staff. Bedside nurses are pretty much indifferent and the public doesn't seem to know or care that they had a Magnet hospital in their town.

    I wonder if this is an isolated case or if it will be a trend, or partial trend.

    ...said CNS' were also told that writing the Magnet document for re-certification was how they would spend their last 30 days after being told their job was eliminated. Not fun writing glowing exemplars about an organization that basically said we don't need you, but make us sound fabulous.

    "Cost savings is the reason given to staff."

    Last I knew it was about 250K year and 500K for certifying.
    OCNRN63 and PMFB-RN like this.
  2. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from moonshadeau
    ...said CNS' were also told that writing the Magnet document for re-certification was how they would spend their last 30 days after being told their job was eliminated. Not fun writing glowing exemplars about an organization that basically said we don't need you, but make us sound fabulous.

    "Cost savings is the reason given to staff."

    Last I knew it was about 250K year and 500K for certifying.
    *** Wow! What a kick in the teeth. Sorry they did that to you. This particular hospital is filled with fantastic nursing staff and great people to work with. However it is a difficult organization to work for if you expect to be treated decently.
    I see they just spent $5 million on new beds.............
  3. Visit  NRSKarenRN profile page
    1
    Knowing Magnet's background sheds light on today's program and healthcare reorganization occurring today:

    ANCC: History of Magnet Timeline

    Advance CEU Article:
    Magnet Research: Raising the Bar
    Almost 30 years of evidence documents the program's mission.

    Many nurses remember the nursing shortage of the 1980s. Introduction of diagnostic-related groups helped lead to Medicare funding reductions, hospital budget shortfalls and large-scale nurse layoffs, a first in the U.S. Nurses who received pink slips discovered there were other careers open to women, and many never came back to nursing, even when hospitals offered cars, vacations, bonuses and money for advanced nursing education.

    In the late 1990s, another national nurse deficit was gaining momentum. A number of critical factors were linked to this exodus of nurses: the "graying of nursing" in practice and academia, decreased nursing school admissions and nurse dissatisfaction in the workplace.

    However, as a result of the 1980s nursing shortage, a number of innovations and programs were in place to address the crisis of the 1990s. None was more evident than the Magnet Recognition Program.

    The scope of this article is limited to the research conducted and applied to nursing practice in Magnet hospitals. It does not describe the Magnet journey hospitals take to meet the requirements to achieve first-time designation by the ANCC Magnet Recognition Program. The designation is good for 4 years, but the Magnet program is dynamic and planning for re-designation begins long before the initial designation period ends.
    Esme12 likes this.
  4. Visit  moonshadeau profile page
    1
    Karen so good to see you are still here
    NRSKarenRN likes this.
  5. Visit  Tait profile page
    1
    Quote from realnursealso/LPN
    We had one hospital in Syracuse, that had magnet status, they have since lost the certification. They continue to have heart surgeons that are well known, and it's the hospital my parents go to if the need arises. No difference when they had it, or now.
    That is because Magnet is recognition for nursing excellence. It takes time to change culture after it is lost, but it will change.


    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses
    NRSKarenRN likes this.
  6. Visit  Tait profile page
    2
    Oops I already said that a long time ago. Carry on, nothing to see here.


    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses
    mso819 and Esme12 like this.
  7. Visit  MunoRN profile page
    5
    Quote from Tait
    That is because Magnet is recognition for nursing excellence. It takes time to change culture after it is lost, but it will change.


    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses
    I'd describe more as a recognition of an environment that is conducive to nursing excellence, rather than nursing excellence itself. It rewards hospital administrators, nursing staff support, etc for facilitating good nursing practice. I find it's often mistaken for being a an award for bedside nurses, which isn't really accurate.
  8. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    0
    Quote from Tait
    I worked beside, I advocate for the nursing population, and I got my MSN so I could advocate MORE for nurses.

    I think the issue most RNs have with MSN/NP etc etc is that they don't have much, if any bedside experience. Why? Because they are scared to do bedside, or they hate it so much they can't stay there. I think the bigger picture in all of this is that each nurse needs to do what they can to improve the state of their own existence which maybe, just maybe, will improve the environment for those so desperate to leave.

    Gypsy I think you are spot on in your endeavors, and I wish more seasoned nurses would get on track with this, especially with scholarships and reimbursement programs out there. For instance, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is looking to support 100 PhD nurses in 2014. Full tuition.

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Announces $20 Million Grant to Support Nurse PhD Scientists - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
    Not trying to derail this thread into another battle of degree vs. degree, but I have already voiced my concerns over the original topic.

    Tait
    ​So, seasoned nurses are the problem?
  9. Visit  mee9mee9 profile page
    3
    Interesting because Vanderbilt is the only magnet status hospital in tennessee yet in the past year they have laid off about 500 people.
  10. Visit  applesxoranges profile page
    0
    Our hospital system gave up on Magnet status thankfully. I think the other hospital system is still aiming for it.
  11. Visit  libbyliberal profile page
    1
    Magenet status is complete and utter ********.

    They sell nurses certifications.
    they sell hospital certifications based on the number of certified nurses and satisfaction surveys.
    it is just a feather in the cap of the ambitious vp of nursings cap.

    It has absolutely nothing to do with pt outcomes
    what really ****** me off is that the application fees and consultants fees would be much better spent on hiring an equivalent number of full time nurses.
    Last edit by libbyliberal on Jun 4, '14
    Crispy Critter likes this.

Need Help Searching For Someone's Comment? Enter your keywords in the box below and we will display any comment that matches your keywords.



Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close