Does insulin need to be kept in the fridge?

  1. 0
    Can anyone answer this for me? I have a student who needs to carry some each day and there is no access to a fridge. Any links that would help to legitimze the answer of cool insulin.

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  2. 7 Comments...

  3. 0
    Quote from FarainFlorida
    Can anyone answer this for me? I have a student who needs to carry some each day and there is no access to a fridge. Any links that would help to legitimze the answer of cool insulin.
    If you don't mind specifying what insulin you use.........

    When I was a pharmacy tech all insulin was kept in the fridge. When a rx was filled a notecard was placed in the baggy and we would pull it out and go grab the insulin from the fridge.

    Have you considered a lunch bag with ice packs to keep your insulin cool?

    Also, there are mini fridges very cheap that connect to your car lighter.
  4. 1
    Here are some tips on storing insulin:

    * For more comfortable injections, store your insulin at room temperature. Insulin may be stored at room temperature for up to a month.
    * Refrigerate insulin that you're not going to use within a month.
    * Do not freeze insulin.
    * Keep insulin out of direct sun light.
    * Never use expired insulin.
    * If your insulin is supposed to be clear, and it is cloudy, discard it.
    * If your insulin is supposed to be cloudy, but it also is clumpy or you're unable to mix it, discard it.

    Check out medlineplus.com, too.

    If the student keeps her insulin away from heat and sunlight, it should be okay.
    sandriya likes this.
  5. 0
    It was explained to me that keeping insulin in the fridge is "old school" thinking. At our current clinical site the insulin is NOT stored in the fridge and is considered "good" for 30 days this way.
    If your friend stores the insulin safetly for travel, it does not need to stay cool but that person MUST, MUST discard the bottle after 30 days no matter how $$$ it is. (assuming that there is any left....)

    HTH! Also, when in doubt.....just ask the pharmacist where the insulin is purchased....they are a wonderful (and often under-utilized) source!!!

    Jenny
    ADN Grad Dec 2005 (eight more weeks to go!!!):hatparty:
  6. 0
    Yeah, ours is kept in the Pyxis at our clinical site....I haven't noticed it being refrigerated, but then I'm usually VERY FOCUSED on the task at the time
  7. 0
    Quote from justjenny
    It was explained to me that keeping insulin in the fridge is "old school" thinking. At our current clinical site the insulin is NOT stored in the fridge and is considered "good" for 30 days this way.
    If your friend stores the insulin safetly for travel, it does not need to stay cool but that person MUST, MUST discard the bottle after 30 days no matter how $$$ it is. (assuming that there is any left....)

    HTH! Also, when in doubt.....just ask the pharmacist where the insulin is purchased....they are a wonderful (and often under-utilized) source!!!

    Jenny
    ADN Grad Dec 2005 (eight more weeks to go!!!):hatparty:
    I am an insulin dependent diabetic. This is what I have learned. Insulin changes on a microscopic level when exposed to direct sunlight and or high temperatures. It is recoomended that I leep my insulin cool, not necessarily refridgerated. If I travel, I use a special pack I have purchased, to keep my insulin cool. Discarding insulin, if it is not clumpy or discolored, is up to the individual. Since Hurricane Charlie, I have kept my insulin refrigerated until I use it. I also keep several vials, seeing the difficult I had obtaining it after HE came thru.

    Grannynurse
  8. 0
    Try Eli Lilly's web site for information from the manufacturer.
  9. 0
    Here's the simple answer. Insulin should be refrigerated until opened for use. Then it depends on how quickly you are going to use up the bottle. If you only need only a couple of units a day and you want to be able to use the entire bottle, then you should continue to keep it cool. If, however, you will use the entire bottle within the 30 day expiration period, go ahead and keep it in the test kit or wherever else you store it for easy use. This also goes for anyone who may not use up the entire bottle but who will be replacing it anyway after 30 days.

    To sum up--it is not necessary to refrigerate insulin that will be used within 30 days.

    I have been insulin dependent for about five years and this information has been corroborated by pharmacists, doctors and nurses.


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