Do you feel more people are entering nursing only to become APRN's? - page 15

I am not a nurse yet, but I'm an EMT, have worked in and around the hospital, and I am currently finishing my last two prerequisite courses before applying for ABSN programs. It seems like 90% of my... Read More

  1. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from Boomer MS, RN
    And perhaps it's not just the correction of the pronunciation but how it is delivered.
    I also think intent is important: it seems like in the initial post it was being suggested as a way to insult or belittle the person.

    Anyways, back to the real discussion....
  2. by   HermioneG
    Quote from elkpark
    You're not off base. And, even if they aren't going into nursing with the initial goal of entering advanced practice, if they are attending a college or university that also has a graduate program in nursing, they are getting told nearly every day that they should aspire to becoming an APRN.
    I really agree with this..

    on a side note, it kind of makes me sad because I've run across a good number of people recently who seem to look down on "just" doing bedside nursing. It drives me nuts. I was at my graduation party, thrilled to have finally made it out of the seemingly never ending tunnel that is the road to being a RN, and I already had people asking me when I was going to go to NP school. It was so aggravating because it diminished all the hard work that had to be put into getting the RN.

    Both bedside nursing and advanced practice nursing are the heart and soul of the nursing profession, and both are equally as honorable. Someone should only be an APRN if that's where their heart is. Not for the money or the title or because someone said they should, but because it's what they want for their life. It's not for everyone and that's totally fine! I don't think it's for me..
    Last edit by HermioneG on Sep 27 : Reason: Clarity
  3. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    ^ don't be surprised when you go on interviews and hiring managers ask where you see yourself in 5 years. If you (Heaven forbid) say you just want to be bedside nursing, you'll be looked upon as having no motivation. It's almost expected that no one stays in bedside nursing, as if it's just a stepping stone.
  4. by   HermioneG
    Quote from NuGuyNurse2b
    ^ don't be surprised when you go on interviews and hiring managers ask where you see yourself in 5 years. If you (Heaven forbid) say you just want to be bedside nursing, you'll be looked upon as having no motivation. It's almost expected that no one stays in bedside nursing, as if it's just a stepping stone.
    I personally didn't get that vibe in my interview, but I can see how people might experience that. The thing is, though, is that there's so many options out there besides APRN and bedside nursing! The world is so diverse, and there's so much impact to be made outside of just those two subsets! but even if someone wanted to do bedside nursing for the duration of their career, that's great! Because in doing that they're probably a great role model and resource for all the new nurses coming in, and are a wealth of knowledge.
  5. by   nursel56
    Quote from elkpark
    You're not off base. And, even if they aren't going into nursing with the initial goal of entering advanced practice, if they are attending a college or university that also has a graduate program in nursing, they are getting told nearly every day that they should aspire to becoming an APRN.
    This is true, and to encourage academic progress in nursing, or any profession is a good thing. Although I feel as someone in this or perhaps a similar thread recently mentioned there seems to be a concurrent lack of emphasis on the role of the clinical nurse specialist, who deals more directly with staff nurses providing direct patient care, they are specialists and in my experience accessible within a reasonable amount of time.

    I felt their role actually raised the level of esteem given to bedside nursing.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Sep 27 : Reason: should've proofread better
  6. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from HermioneG
    it kind of makes me sad because I've run across a good number of people recently who seem to look down on "just" doing bedside nursing.
    Are these lay people or nurses? I think there are a fair number of RNs that have become/are fed up with bedside nursing and I think they have some valid reasons for that. Lay people really don't understand what an RN vs a APN vs a MD vs a PT vs a RT really do.


    Quote from HermioneG
    It drives me nuts. I was at my graduation party, thrilled to have finally made it out of the seemingly never ending tunnel that is the road to being a RN, and I already had people asking me when I was going to go to NP school. It was so aggravating because it diminished all the hard work that had to be put into getting the RN.
    Don't let things like this drive you nuts and definitely don't let anything/anyone diminish what you have accomplished; when people say things like this take the time to educate them. I think often times those comments are really just strangely worded/attempted compliments.

    FWIW, it doesn't get better as an APN. From some experience of friends, it doesn't get better as an MD. People seem to always be asking when you are going to accomplish the next step. Same thing with family life: have a significant other, when are you getting engaged? Engaged, when are you getting married? Married, when are you having a baby? Baby, when are you having the next?

    Quote from HermioneG
    Both bedside nursing and advanced practice nursing are the heart and soul of the nursing profession, and both are equally as honorable. Someone should only be an APRN if that's where their heart is. Not for the money or the title or because someone said they should, but because it's what they want for their life. It's not for everyone and that's totally fine! I don't think it's for me..
    Absolutely. The only good reason to be an APN (IMHO) is because you want the role.
  7. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from callinshotz
    As I have stated repeatedly I’m just starting the race. I have stated that I only speak on what I’ve observed and what other APRNs have spoken out about the programs.
    That's ok, just trying to figure out where you are coming from. I feel compelled to say, keep an open mind. You can't believe all that you read on the internet. I feel like we hash out these debates on the forums but I actually see very little debate in actual clinical practice.
  8. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from nursel56
    This is true, and to encourage academic progress in nursing, or any profession is a good thing. Although I feel as someone in this or perhaps a similar thread recently mentioned there seems to be a concurrent lack of emphasis on the role of the clinical nurse specialist, who deals more directly with staff nurses providing direct patient care, they are specialists and in my experience accessible within a reasonable amount of time.

    I felt their role actually raised the level of esteem given to bedside nursing.
    Sadly, the CNS role is going extinct due to the almighty $$$.
  9. by   db2xs
    Quote from RNperdiem
    Nursing is often a backup plan for people who don't make it into med school, and advance practice is the alternative.
    I don't know any nurse who became a nurse because they didn't get into med school, but I'm not saying I know every single nurse out there.

    I was talking with a PA student recently and she told me that apparently you can now become a PA and then do a fast-track sort of course to become an MD after PA school. I would think someone who didn't get into med school would opt to do something like that.
  10. by   db2xs
    Quote from Nurse Beth
    It seems clinical bedside nursing practice is becoming the domain of new grad nurses and nurses with 2-3 yrs experience.
    New grads or those who have been around for 20, 30, 40 years.
  11. by   KatieMI
    Quote from db2xs
    I don't know any nurse who became a nurse because they didn't get into med school, but I'm not saying I know every single nurse out there.

    I was talking with a PA student recently and she told me that apparently you can now become a PA and then do a fast-track sort of course to become an MD after PA school. I would think someone who didn't get into med school would opt to do something like that.
    There is one such program in the whole country, it leads to D.O. degree (which is less prestigious and generally shunned from most prestigious residencies like Derm or Rad/Onco) and cuts down just one year overall, with a total whole big 12 slots in the whole place):

    Accelerated Physician Assistant Pathway - LECOM Education System

    And, on top of it, one still has to go through residency bottleneck.

    I know at least 100 of foreign-trained MDs who couldn't, or wouldn't, go through USMLE/residency pathway for a range of reasons and switched to nursing. Over 80% of them went either to NP or PA eventually. In addition to that, at least 5 out of my MSN class of 42 went through pre-med for at least some time, and there is also a trickle of "non-traditional medicine-related doctorate" students such as chiropractors and naturopaths going mostly into direct MSN programs. Their professional organizations estimate about 2 - 3% of them doing so every year.

    So, it is a rather common thing. It is rather easy to estimate that summary expected 25 years income of CRNA, PA or well-placed NP specialist is simply higher then one of primary care MD while putting less demands on personal life and expenses. It would be even more common if PA programs stopped being so fiercely unwelcome to foreign-trained MD applicants.
  12. by   Dodongo
    Quote from db2xs
    I don't know any nurse who became a nurse because they didn't get into med school, but I'm not saying I know every single nurse out there.

    I was talking with a PA student recently and she told me that apparently you can now become a PA and then do a fast-track sort of course to become an MD after PA school. I would think someone who didn't get into med school would opt to do something like that.
    I declined interviews for medical school, and a year later decided to go into nursing instead. I'm pretty happy with my decision overall.

    And I live right next to that bridge program here in Pittsburgh. It is a 3 year D.O. Program for PAs. It doesn't make much sense because there are already 3 year programs for traditional Bachelor students. So it's not a very good deal IMO. And like was said it's DO so unless you are a stellar student you won't be matching into super prestigious specialties. Further, I think half of the students must declare family practice and be relegated to that. Even if their interests change.
  13. by   WestCoastSunRN
    I'm an educated woman. But I cannot, for the life of me, say this word -----------> "anesthetist" .....especially if I have to say the word "nurse" right before it. i mean, c'mon. Try saying it five times fast.

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